U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Happy Easter!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Frugal Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-19-2017, 08:43 PM
 
12,404 posts, read 9,199,643 times
Reputation: 8863

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Curious Investor View Post
I am not being politically correct in the following statement, but I believe it is true:

The trouble with saving money in housing and going to a low cost apartment or home is you have to live with poor people.

I believe on an individual basis many low income (poor) people are good. But I have learned from experience that if you live in an apartment complex with very low rents there is more trouble. Noise, poor maintenance, crime, poor customer service, police activity, etc.

When I tried to live a frugal life, my first thing I saved money on was my home. Because housing was forty percent of my expenses. I learned the hard way that trying to be frugal in the place I lived was a recipe for disaster.
I think you can mitigate some of these issues by renting a room in a house, rather than an apartment in some sketchy place with habitual drunks!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-19-2017, 09:35 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,722 posts, read 47,495,927 times
Reputation: 17572
We move to / live in a very low cost area. It is rural, mostly dense forest, homes are 1/2 to 1 mile apart. Home prices are low. Property taxes are low. Locals whine about 'crime' but seriously I have never lived in a place with crime this low. Homes are unlocked. Keys are commonly left in the car. In the winter, people leave their cars running in the parking lots as they go shopping. Our house has never been locked in 11 years. Few people here earn over Minimum Wage. Most people here work p/t and seasonal jobs.

What other posters are saying about low income areas, and high crime, does not speak of rural New England.

I am in a different thread where they are talking about average household income and per-capita income. One town near me has a per-capita income of $8k/year. It is not a high crime area. Not at all.

My town's per-capita income is below Minimum-Wage. 'crime' here is mostly about drug abuse. But this state is not ranked in the top 50 for any specific drug. So while it seems a big deal, it isn't.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2017, 10:29 PM
 
Location: Too Far from Florida!
149 posts, read 307,504 times
Reputation: 198
My mom will be frugal in everything except Neighboorood
The school, teachers, the area, the people, friends boyfriend will be determined by the area we lived
That's how it was, we wanted to be the poorest in good neighborhoodS
Now we appreciate this decision
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2017, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
3,661 posts, read 1,770,490 times
Reputation: 2200
I must be some sort of statistical outlier. Either that, or the low-income neighborhood I call home in Northwest Philadelphia must not be all that awful.

I recognize elements of East Germantown in some of your descriptions. At the end of my block, at the intersection where I wait for the buses that take me to the subway to the city center, there's a "deli" that's totally bereft of lunchmeat. What it does have is beer to take out. It makes its money off that, which is a now-changing artifice of Pennsylvania's liquor laws. After about 6 pm, you can always find people hanging out in front of it, and on occasion, the hangers-out include one or two Philadelphia police officers.

They also include a woman who, one morning as I was headed to catch the bus, said to me, "You must be a really hard worker. You're always on the go." This same woman said to me on a Monday evening after I returned from a weekend in Washington, "I made sure they left batteries for your smoke detector. The man across the street from you died when his apartment caught fire." When I see her, I usually say hello.

That apartment, like my own, took up a floor of a three-story rowhouse. I live here because I need most of my income to dig myself out of the financial holes I dug myself into in my 50s. (I'll be 59 in October.)

That "stop 'n' go" had an instant memorial on its side wall on another occasion when I returned from DC. A month or two after that, one appeared on the side wall of the closed corner store at the other end of my block. I've left my apartment to find that intersection with the stop 'n' go filled with cop cars, and on another evening, while I was waiting for a bus, a crowd of young kids - women, mostly - got into an argument that devolved in to a fight.

Yet everything in my apartment is right where I put it three years ago. (Unless I've moved it around, that is.) There hasn't been a break-in on my side of my block since I moved here. And the one time I did find something missing - a pass case in which I carry my driver's license and credit cards - I came back home to first panic, then go to see if I could get a friend to drive me somewhere. As I went down the stairs, I heard a "thwack" as I slid my hand down the bannister. There was my passcase, on the floor; it had been left on the railing.

The following Monday, i ran into my downstairs neighbor as he was leaving. "Thanks for finding my wallet and leaving it for me," I said.

"It wasn't me who found it," he replied. "A woman came up and rang my bell. She said someone who lives here lost this on the bus, and she had to come over to return it."

And my friends who live in better-off neighborhoods have visited me fairly often without incident.

I harbor no illusions that my neighborhood is tranquil and safe. But it seems it's less dangerous and troublesome than one might imagine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2017, 05:46 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
28,392 posts, read 50,602,810 times
Reputation: 28622
I did that when I moved out of my parents house to an apartment in college, and at age 19 found the crime, noise, and having to watch my back a bit of an adventure. After marrying we moved to a more peaceful area, and before having kids an even better area for buying our first house. Now that they are grown we are staying until retirement, but even then it will not be a poor area, just less affluent than here. Where to live is not something to be frugal about.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2017, 11:34 AM
 
Location: The analog world
15,572 posts, read 8,749,121 times
Reputation: 20900
I think I'm at a different life stage than the OP, but my strategy to reduce housing costs would be to downsize in the same community I'm living now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2017, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Greater LA area
15,736 posts, read 11,750,377 times
Reputation: 30563
Find a healthy balance - lower income area without too much concern about safety/noises.


I live in an area my friends/coworkers wouldn't live in. It is not officially a ghetto (that's where I draw the line) but it is lower middle class. When I split from my ex, we didn't have to sell the house like most other divorcees. My house is paid off this year and I am 40 and single.


My area has crime. But everybodies area has crime. I hear people in gated communities complain about car break ins also. If you leave stuff in your car overnight than you are attracting thieves in any kind of neighborhood.


If you work and most of your income goes to your place then you either have the wrong job or the wrong place.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2017, 01:23 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,433 posts, read 24,210,764 times
Reputation: 24745
I have lived on both sides of the tracks. Today I live in an urban, probably lower middle class, neighborhood in Las Vegas. I love it. I am close to everything. It's all at my fingertips. Yes there is crime like any city and I am careful and observant. I like my neighbors and we watch out for each other. We know who belongs in the neighborhood and who doesn't. In my little cul de sac there are people of all colors and an elderly couple from Germany. And that's all just fine with me. The neighborhood is actually very quiet and kids still play in the streets.

My home before Las Vegas was about 4K sf, built of stone and on a 1 ac riverfront lot. 2 garages and a triple driveway. The yardwork was endless and my 100 mile a day commute ate up most of the rest of my spare time. I was close to nothing. I don't miss it at all. It was beautiful. That I do miss. There was something amazing about watching the eagles, otters, turkeys, and huge flocks of swans and other birds. But I had no life! Most of my wildlife watching was done while I was mowing, shoveling, or raking!

Today I am grateful I learned how to be poor in my younger days. It's like riding a bike. You never forget. I live quite well on not a lot of money and honestly I am proud of my skills. I don't care at all about having the latest and best of everything. I have enough and that's good for me. Today I have a life! I bought myself the time to enjoy it!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2017, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,706 posts, read 21,760,954 times
Reputation: 27757
Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
I have lived on both sides of the tracks. Today I live in an urban, probably lower middle class, neighborhood in Las Vegas. I love it. I am close to everything. It's all at my fingertips. Yes there is crime like any city and I am careful and observant. I like my neighbors and we watch out for each other. We know who belongs in the neighborhood and who doesn't. In my little cul de sac there are people of all colors and an elderly couple from Germany. And that's all just fine with me. The neighborhood is actually very quiet and kids still play in the streets.

My home before Las Vegas was about 4K sf, built of stone and on a 1 ac riverfront lot. 2 garages and a triple driveway. The yardwork was endless and my 100 mile a day commute ate up most of the rest of my spare time. I was close to nothing. I don't miss it at all. It was beautiful. That I do miss. There was something amazing about watching the eagles, otters, turkeys, and huge flocks of swans and other birds. But I had no life! Most of my wildlife watching was done while I was mowing, shoveling, or raking!

Today I am grateful I learned how to be poor in my younger days. It's like riding a bike. You never forget. I live quite well on not a lot of money and honestly I am proud of my skills. I don't care at all about having the latest and best of everything. I have enough and that's good for me. Today I have a life! I bought myself the time to enjoy it!
I've lived in some very "high rent" areas. It was fun while it lasted. I grew up PDP--pretty damn poor-- and have lived in middle class areas. Couldn't always get new shoes when my feet grew.

I appreciate knowing how to be poor. My grandmother, a widow, raised 4 children during the depression. My mother lived in England during WWII.

Pretty funny. My son signed up for a secret Santa exchange. He received his gift before he mailed his. No wrapping paper, so he had to buy some. I told him that if he hadn't ripped open his package like a 5 year old, he wouldn't have had to buy paper.

Some habits die hard.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2017, 07:32 PM
 
421 posts, read 262,799 times
Reputation: 337
40% on housing. I am afraid that is too much, you can't save much with that. Housing is about 14% of our household income. I think 20% or less make more sense. Good luck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Frugal Living
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top