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Old 02-08-2017, 03:08 PM
 
11,623 posts, read 5,465,637 times
Reputation: 11000

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Quote:
Originally Posted by 49erfan916 View Post
how ghetto is you!!
lol. I just haven't upgraded my interior. A lot of people haven't, but everyone in my building except me has

No one cares. I'm a great neighbor!

It's like Mayberry in here. I love it.
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Old 02-09-2017, 10:08 AM
 
9,454 posts, read 15,020,411 times
Reputation: 15409
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
nooooooooooo . i spent a lifetime making sure i never had to go back to one.


You and me both
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Old 02-09-2017, 11:59 AM
 
Location: East Helena, MT
765 posts, read 479,144 times
Reputation: 2003
I would never move to a bad part of town, however I did move across the country from Florida to Montana to reduce my cost of living and provide a better future for my children. There are some really nice, lower cost of living areas in our great country.


With the internet, you can go to websites like realtor.com and see homes for sale anywhere in the country. Find a place you really like, and then start applying for jobs. Just because the cost of living is less, doesn't mean that there aren't any good jobs.


My Aunt was disabled. She was living in the middle of the hood in West Palm Beach, FL. Her only income was SSDI, and her husband was a carpenter who earned about 20K a year. They found a property online in Troy, Alabama. It was an older house on 3 acres for 75k. Even with their limited income they could afford the mortgage. They closed on the home, and moved to Troy without ever having visited. My cousins went from playing in a park full of broken bottles, drug needles, and rusted out cars, to living in the country. My Uncle found work quickly as a handyman, due to all of the older houses. My Aunts SSDI stayed the same. Their quality of life improved immeasurably. When she passed away 10 years later, she was in her own home. This was a woman who had never owned anything in her life. My Uncle still lives there and he is going to give the house to their children when he passes on.


There are lots of deals out there if you just look.
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Old 02-09-2017, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Valley of the Sun
1,314 posts, read 989,089 times
Reputation: 1711
Buy a modest house in a nice neighborhood.

Best of the frugal and enjoyable life experience.
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Old 02-13-2017, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Saint John, IN
10,638 posts, read 3,316,997 times
Reputation: 12748
Quote:
Originally Posted by 49erfan916 View Post
the low income housing are in some really rough neighborhoods. I don't want to get shot. I much rather live in my big, safe house and live frugally than to move in the ghetto to save a few hundred dollars but worry about my life.
Agreed!


When I was a kid we lived in a low income area. Crime wasn't too bad, but wasn't the best. Bums hanging on the corners begging and parks that were not safe. Schools were also pretty crappy because they didn't have the tax base from the residents. I was not going to live like that as an adult and raise my children in that type of environment.


I recently lived in a VERY high COL town in an affluent Chicago suburb for 10 years. Taxes and housing were insane and then of course everyone is keeping up with the Jones. We had enough and moved about an hour and a half away to NW Indiana. We still live in an affluent area that also has very low crime. We purchased an exceptional house and the COL is WAY lower! Not only did we drop our mortgage payment by almost $1k, but our property taxes are a third of what they used to be! There are also no taxes on food here. I can now take that savings and put it toward more important things such as my children's future college tuition.
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Old 02-16-2017, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Delaware
238 posts, read 137,920 times
Reputation: 516
When I tried to live a frugal life, my first thing I saved money on was my home. Because housing was forty percent of my expenses. I learned the hard way that trying to be frugal in the place I lived was a recipe for disaster.[/quote]


When young, we bought in a good neighborhood, but a modest house. Did some decorating and sold and bought in a good neighborhood but a fixer-upper. Did a lot of renovating, and sold again...made a lot of money. This time bought in a semi-rural very nice area and built a new house. Stayed 10 years, decorated, landscaped and sold again. Bought a condo in a nice area. Retired, moved to a very nice neighborhood and built an energy efficient home in a state that has a lower cost of living. Life is good! (never bought in a depressed area just because the house was cheap.....always tried to live where school districts were good).
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Old 02-17-2017, 06:00 AM
Status: "I cannot wait for the heat to break..." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,368 posts, read 25,494,040 times
Reputation: 87958
I have no problem living in a neighborhood below my means, preferably way below, as long as I am safe.


If I was alone I would rent, rv and stay in parks, or share a house to save money.
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Old 02-17-2017, 10:43 AM
 
11,325 posts, read 5,846,190 times
Reputation: 21008
Quote:
Originally Posted by lewdog_5 View Post
Buy a modest house in a nice neighborhood.

Best of the frugal and enjoyable life experience.
If you look on Zillow, I have the smallest house on the smallest lot in the nice part of town. I'm on a private lane shared with a couple other houses so it's also very secluded. Unless I'm gone overnight, I don't lock my doors. By regional standards, it's a low property tax town. The house is paid-for and completely remodeled to my taste. My home ownership costs are lower than renting Section 8 housing in a bad part of the nearby high poverty rate city.
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Old 02-22-2017, 08:24 PM
 
9,454 posts, read 15,020,411 times
Reputation: 15409
You just might end up living "ghetto" whether you like it or not, if you don't watch your credit scores!
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Old 02-22-2017, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Fairfield, CT
5,531 posts, read 8,188,759 times
Reputation: 5765
At this stage of the game, I would have to be really desperate to move to a low income neighborhood. I have never lived in one actually. I have always lived in middle to upper income areas, and that is what I am used to.
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