U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Frugal Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-18-2017, 03:21 AM
 
105 posts, read 86,891 times
Reputation: 230

Advertisements

I am not being politically correct in the following statement, but I believe it is true:

The trouble with saving money in housing and going to a low cost apartment or home is you have to live with poor people.

I believe on an individual basis many low income (poor) people are good. But I have learned from experience that if you live in an apartment complex with very low rents there is more trouble. Noise, poor maintenance, crime, poor customer service, police activity, etc.

When I tried to live a frugal life, my first thing I saved money on was my home. Because housing was forty percent of my expenses. I learned the hard way that trying to be frugal in the place I lived was a recipe for disaster.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-18-2017, 07:50 AM
 
5,470 posts, read 8,160,530 times
Reputation: 7284
It often depends on age.

For instance:
Rather than "living well" early, I lived like a broke college student till I was nearly 30. This allowed me to rack up net worth, take advantage of compound interest, and gradually increase my standard of living.

Some of my peers lived well, then in their 30's (or 40's I'll bet having seen it happen) they will have hard choices to make/holes to dig out of.

I wouldn't do it NOW.
of course.... I don't have to.
Partially because I had a roomate till I was 28.
(I'll note, spending 8 years in the USMC made this "more normal" during that time.)


Also: your premise is not necessarely true.
My morgtage on my rural land (house built for cash) is $324/month.
As my nearest neighbor is over 1/2 mile away I don't 'live with' anyone.

If I lived in a (shudders) urban environment in a coastal region that might be true. But there's many inexpensive living options with "not poor people" in 'flyover country' they may LOOK LIKE they are 'poor' compared to say.... this girl I knew in NYC, but when you look at cost of living, and QUALITY of living. (Her apartment was so small there was no place for guests to sleep except in her bed.... but we mannaged!)
The people in flyover country are often better off.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2017, 09:50 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
20,999 posts, read 25,737,156 times
Reputation: 39377
It's possible to move to a lower cost-of-living location and then you can be in, at the very lowest, a lower middle class neighborhood where people work for a living. Some working class neighborhoods are decent places to live, if you can find one where the residents own their own home.

If you want to be in a nicer place to live, find a neighborhood that you can afford where there are no rentals, and buy your house.

There is certainly a strong link between living on welfare and not taking care of where you live. Not everyone on welfare is a slob, but certainly a higher percentage of those persons are than you will find in the general population. There is a higher incidence of drug use and alcohol, both of which make for bad neighbors. Not that professional people can not be collectors or bat-wing crazy, but it will be a smaller percentage of them and less risk of ending up next door to them.

No matter what neighborhood, always look around at several different times of day and look at what is happening in the surrounding blocks, before you rent or buy.

Sorry to have to point out but the population ios getting lazier, more entitled, and more self-centered as time goes on. It's getting harder to escape from slobs, nut cases, and generalized losers that it used to be.,
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2017, 09:52 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
16,841 posts, read 51,286,023 times
Reputation: 27648
Not to put too fine a point on it but there are poor people and there are criminals. The two are not synonymous.

Also, the problems you describe are often directly proportional to population density and disenfranchisement of blue collar workers.

As the previous post implied, rural poverty areas may have a crime density that is actually lower than that of a wealthier neighborhood in a city. Stacking people on top of each other in boxes with minimal space causes problems. Doing so using poorly constructed boxes that transmit sound, odors, and other invasions of privacy multiplies those problems.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2017, 09:54 AM
 
9,271 posts, read 4,734,254 times
Reputation: 6014
It depends on the area. It's not helpful for general comment. But even my first job in college, I made a decision to pay more money to live in a safer neighborhood. The reason is simple, I need to stay alive to earn money. Going to an unsafe area has a high likelihood of reducing that to zero.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2017, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Western Canada
246 posts, read 113,803 times
Reputation: 548
As a single 30s woman who will be living alone, no I won't live in a low-income area to save money. Luckily the city I am moving to is very safe in general, but real estate and COL are higher than average for the province. My apartment will be just under 50% of my monthly income so I am happy to have found the frugal living board as I will need to be very mindful of my spending from now on.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2017, 04:48 PM
 
64,532 posts, read 66,075,955 times
Reputation: 42978
nooooooooooo . i spent a lifetime making sure i never had to go back to one.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2017, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA (Sandy Springs)
3,528 posts, read 2,301,001 times
Reputation: 2762
No, plus if you buy then you don't actually save money considering your house will appreciate more in better areas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-18-2017, 06:13 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
11,407 posts, read 13,950,805 times
Reputation: 10901
Never, we always buy the smallest house in the best neighborhood. Too many quality of life issues in low income neighborhoods.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2017, 02:20 AM
 
13,710 posts, read 22,821,151 times
Reputation: 18521
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curious Investor View Post
I am not being politically correct in the following statement, but I believe it is true:

The trouble with saving money in housing and going to a low cost apartment or home is you have to live with poor people.

I believe on an individual basis many low income (poor) people are good. But I have learned from experience that if you live in an apartment complex with very low rents there is more trouble. Noise, poor maintenance, crime, poor customer service, police activity, etc.

When I tried to live a frugal life, my first thing I saved money on was my home. Because housing was forty percent of my expenses. I learned the hard way that trying to be frugal in the place I lived was a recipe for disaster.


This is an interesting question. My initial reaction is NO WAY, NEVER AGAIN. I lived in a lot of inner city neighborhoods from 1984-1995 and had the great privilege of dealing with several burglaries, a car break-in, a gun fight, two attempted assaults (my cute beagle mix was part German shepherd as a couple thugs found out), several crack houses on the street as well as some of the friendliest ladies on the street, if you get my drift.

I think that I would rather live in a good neighborhood where people take care of their homes, where people feel like they can walk the streets and parents actually are around to raise their children. There are a lot of neighborhoods like that that are fairly affordable. And if you are a young single person and are fairly personable, often you can find living situations that are very low cost. I lived with an 85 year old guy for $100 a month and about three hours of housework.

To be happy, i think that you have to find an area where people share many of the same values.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Frugal Living
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top