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Old 02-05-2017, 09:45 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
I don't care so much for organic but rather it must be fresh. Some fruits and vegetables don't need to be organic. I think banana is one of them.
But the whole point is a) the environment and b) the farm workers who must work around toxins if it is not organic.
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Old 02-05-2017, 09:47 PM
 
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Originally Posted by beachmouse View Post
What's in season in the USA still matters. If they have to ship your oranges in from Australia, it adds to your cost

It adds to global warming, too. No need to burn that extra fuel.
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Old 02-05-2017, 10:12 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
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If you are NYC based, you will need to venture out and collect your produce in season and 'put it up' for the winter.

Or you need Amazon Prime and be a diligent shopper.

Gleaning is a way to get bulk food cheap, Many local places have gleaner groups / benefits for elderly and needy.

CSA is another option, but you will need to spend a lot of time on the farm to contribute. We had friends in Boston who ran / participated in a CSA in VT. It was a long haul and many summer weeks away from town.
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Old 02-05-2017, 10:32 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Sprouts, if your area has those stores.
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Old 02-05-2017, 11:00 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martha Anne View Post
But the whole point is a) the environment and b) the farm workers who must work around toxins if it is not organic.
Then don't eat or don't buy food, grow your own food. I do. But I don't like to politicize food.
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Old 02-06-2017, 10:12 PM
 
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Can put entertainment center in backyard, fill with dirt and cover with storm windows when you find it. Can keep lettuce growing good part of year with this approach. Must take off the windows during hot days or it wilts - works nicely if you are distance from grocery and cannot get good lettuce. Water it with dishwater that cooled off. Use 'green' no phosphate soap...Anyone with big garden visible from road may strike up a long-term deal with you. Can start a garden plot on abandoned city lot with permission and people have to do work on the lot for their share of the food... The city 'green' grocers sell boxes of fresh produce monthly from Community Supported Gardens - somethings like turnips or beets you may not want but is one flat price for 20 lbs of anything. If you can make soup, this can be good deal...Can encourage city or friend to do garden and provide the labor if you don't have the space...Craigslist is good place to search or post this stuff.
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Old 02-06-2017, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martha Anne View Post
We are not near farmer's markets. Very inconvenient to get to them.

We cannot grow our own.

So we buy our organic produce in supermarkets. So expensive!

Also, there are no co-ops near us.
Have you looked into whether there are any CSAs (Community Supported Agriculture farms) in your area? They aren't all organic, but some are. In my experience, they are usually cheaper than the grocery store, but sometimes more expensive (depending on how well the farm does that year). Many in my area have winter shares, where you essentially get winter squash. Not super exciting, but you can always add in a little variety from the grocery store.
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Old 02-06-2017, 11:02 PM
 
8,768 posts, read 10,329,110 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martha Anne View Post
So we buy our organic produce in supermarkets. So expensive!
Unfortunately, your location is a main problem.

There are so few organic farms anywhere close to you that what few there are has to serve a huge area with every store that sells or caters to the organic retails segment vying for the same reduced stockpile of produce. Add in the "organic or natural" restaurant craze and the demand far exceeds the supply. So major retailers purchase in bulk from large corporate farms with organic certification and ship nationwide. That adds a large cost. Plus organic products do not sell as fast or with regularity that waste is larger (although some goes to charity close to the going bad date) and that cost also has t be reflected in the final price.

Small organic farmers hate delivering to the "big polluted cities"a s the cost is driven up by the expense of having their items delivered to a city setting. So they sell to a broker of organic produce who sells to a specialty distributor of organic produce who sells to the big city distributors and purveyors. The concept of farm to retail bin doesn't apply in a big city. It's just the unfortunate reality.

Have you considered finding others friends who would be interested in organic produce and start your own co-op? That's how many get their organic produce at a lower cost in metropolitan areas. Plus it gives everyone a chance to get away from the city when it's their turn to do the buying.
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Old 02-06-2017, 11:11 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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I can't afford to care about organic foods. But, sometimes I'll find a sale, where the organic stuff is actually cheaper. So, I've learned to check out the ads and peruse the organic section, just in case.

Do you have a discount grocer nearby? I shop mostly at Grocery Outlet, and they actually have a lot of organic fresh, frozen and canned goods, and much cheaper than anywhere else. So, you might want to check out the discount grocers in your area, if there are any - like Food Maxx, Grocery Outlet, etc.
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Old 02-06-2017, 11:36 PM
 
Location: midvalley Oregon and Eastside seattle area
2,900 posts, read 1,344,207 times
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The only difference in Organic blueberries and Nonorganic is the field certification and label. There just aren't any insect or disease pests that bother blueberries much. Copper or sulfur sprays which are "organic" are used in bud break, after harvest and winter.
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