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Old 03-15-2017, 12:24 PM
 
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There's also a lot of hidden costs, imho.
For example, you can't buy anything in bulk bc there's nowhere to put it. Buying a 6 pack of tp vs 36 pack adds up. If the grocery store has an awesome sale, you can't buy 12 cans of it.
It's not cheap to build quality storage or other livability hacks unless you're handy or have a friend who is.
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Old 03-15-2017, 12:30 PM
 
Location: At the Lake (in Texas)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
If you have to pay lot rental, what's the difference from a mobile home park?

I think the "tiny house" movement is much more about reducing one's focus on possessions than about reducing housing expenses. Most of the accounts I read also involve living in the back yard of a relative and using the relative's house for things like washing clothes, taking baths, etc.

Without doing the numbers I suspect the lowest housing cost is to buy an actual house, very small, in a low cost of living area, taking a small mortgage and paying it off ASAP. Even the smallest conventional house will have features that the "tiny house" doesn't, like normal sized kitchen appliances, a complete bathroom, and a washer/dryer.

I grew up in a 2 bedroom 1 bath house of 930 sq.ft., for example.

The other candidate for lowest housing costs, I expect, is the mobile home on a lot you own outright. But again I haven't done the numbers.
If you put the tiny house on your own land, you wouldn't have to pay "lot rent"...there are many different ways to save money. The one thing I would definitely do differently if I had the chance would be to purchase something, some kind of land, and home, even a trailer or tiny home, rather than spend years renting...at the time as a single mother and interest rates at 12% and above, I just couldn't seem to swing it, but in hindsight, I would have found a way.

As one poster has said here somewhere, you could do the same with a small conventional home that you pay off very quickly. But renting, in many instances, now seems to me like throwing money away although it allowed me to raise my son in a much nicer home than I could have afforded at the time, so I don't know, maybe it was a trade off. As they say, hindsight definitely is 20/20.
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Old 03-15-2017, 12:37 PM
 
Location: At the Lake (in Texas)
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Originally the tiny house movement was definitely great for, say, students who didn't want to pay for an apartment or dorm, or some single person who wasn't sure yet where they wanted to "land" and wanted an affordable way to be mobile and yet avoid paying rent.

However, one thing I have learned from reading about many tiny home owners is that their tiny home is a second home ... one of my favorites had a lovely little vintage tiny home on some land up in the PNW, and also had a separate cutely decorated hen house and another storage house (decorated to look like a home too) that was larger than the tiny home. The entire set up was on a large piece of lovely land. Then I discovered later that this was her second home where she went to get away from the bustle of the city (it may have been Portland) where she worked during the week, so it was like her weekend getaway.
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Old 03-15-2017, 01:13 PM
Status: "I cannot wait for the heat to break..." (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
20,368 posts, read 25,504,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetbottoms View Post
Hubby and I have been in discussion about tiny homes on frugality vs condo. We currently have a nearly 1200 sqft condo at $1300 a month. Very cheap for where we are (they usually run around $1700). While in discussion with my father who travels the country in a 5th wheel full time.

I don't think owning a tiny home would actually be much cheaper than a regular home but anyone want to chime in? Yes you don't have a mortgage for most of them but in its place you're adding lot rental (some up to $1000 a month if you plan on staying in one place longer term), gas, electric, food etc. With this being a fairly new movement also there aren't tons of places allowing these structures to come onto their lots. It feels like whatever you're saving in rent you're making up in lot rental and gas alone. Am I the only one who's thinking this way?

I don't get the tiny house movement. They are extremely overpriced on a square foot basis.

Like your father I am also an rver...used to be fill time. I think if you want the most bang for your buck the better option would be an inexpensive travel trailer and a nice park to stay at. You can get one for under $20,000 and the lot rent on a yearly basis can be from $200.00 per month- $1000.00 per month from what I have seen. Your area is pretty expensive so not sure what the prices are now.

On top of that you get all the amenities the park has to offer and sometimes a gated entrance. In the end....you own your trailer as opposed to having nothing after renting an apartment or a condo.

If I was younger I would do that although it would depend on where I lived. South Florida can be brutal in a trailer in the summer....and northern climates would get too cold.



Oh and in all the parks I have been at over the years I have only seen 2 tiny houses. So I have no idea where they all are and I have never seen one on the road. If they are putting them on private land then you would be better off building your own. They are just too expensive.
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Old 03-15-2017, 01:24 PM
 
4,316 posts, read 2,153,428 times
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In theory, the tiny house movement should have resulted in a low cost way to live.

It hasn't because most people looking at them actually could afford more but think the tiny house movement is "trendy"


Thus, since it now appears on TV shows etc, the people promoting saw the opportunity to gouge.
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Old 03-15-2017, 01:27 PM
Status: "I cannot wait for the heat to break..." (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Where the sun likes to shine!!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David A Stone View Post
In theory, the tiny house movement should have resulted in a low cost way to live.

It hasn't because most people looking at them actually could afford more but think the tiny house movement is "trendy"


Thus, since it now appears on TV shows etc, the people promoting saw the opportunity to gouge.


But the cost of a tiny house was never cheap so therefore it can never be a low cost way of living. If you have your own land you can hire someone to build a small stick built for much cheaper. Heck you could live in a modified shed.
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Old 03-15-2017, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mntns., NC
10,232 posts, read 14,096,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David A Stone View Post
In theory, the tiny house movement should have resulted in a low cost way to live.

It hasn't because most people looking at them actually could afford more but think the tiny house movement is "trendy"


Thus, since it now appears on TV shows etc, the people promoting saw the opportunity to gouge.

Amen to that David. I like my creature comforts ... but, I could 'sacrifice' a bit for a nice Class A motor home (even a pre-owned one) and follow the seasons around the country for a couple of years.
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Old 03-15-2017, 03:07 PM
 
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The dirty little secret about those adorable "tiny homes" is that -- due to city ordinances, building codes, etc. -- it's not legal to permanently park them and occupy them full-time in most places. Nor are they built for travel except from one permanent spot to another (that's why they make travel trailers). If you're a Millennial, you can stick them in your parents' backyard and use them as a playhouse. Notice that's this is what ends up happening to them at the end of most of those HGTV shows.
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Old 03-15-2017, 03:08 PM
 
Location: Gilbert, AZ
3,003 posts, read 1,698,864 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eddiehaskell View Post
The needing a truck part is a biggy that the shows usually leave out of their final cost. A reliable full size truck (preferably a diesel) can easily cost $25-30k and get ~12 mpg towing a tiny house (I'm guessing 10k pounds loaded up with furniture and stuff).

Yup. I'm guessing for most people it's a large vehicle they otherwise would not need. So they either own an additional vehicle, with all of the associated licensing, insurance and maintenance cost... or they own a big vehicle instead of a small vehicle and use more gasoline/fuel than they would otherwise. Either way it's detracting from the minimalism idea.
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Old 03-15-2017, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Left coast
2,321 posts, read 1,057,551 times
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[quote=otterhere;47519211]The dirty little secret about those adorable "tiny homes" is that -- due to city ordinances, building codes, etc. -- it's not legal to permanently park them and occupy them full-time in most places. Nor are they built for travel except from one permanent spot to another (that's why they make travel trailers). If you're a Millennial, you can stick them in your parents' backyard and use them as a playhouse. Notice that's this is what ends up happening to them at the end of most of those HGTV shows.[/QUOTE

exactly, I think you could hide them in a friends backyard for a while , or if you own your own home, use it as a guest house, but the city frowns upon them as full-time residences....
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