U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Frugal Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-20-2017, 10:12 PM
Status: "happy again, no longer catless! t...." (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,433 posts, read 16,760,004 times
Reputation: 16460

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by twowilldo View Post
Really? Under $20K? We've built too; just buying a used Case 810 backhoe/loader from a farmer in western Nebraska to dig the leach field was $16K all by itself, let alone buying the permit, tanks, pipes, electrical, pump, pump alarm and fill over that. Our well is very deep, over 1,000 ft. so had to hire that and it was north of $25K after the casing and Gould pump, controller and pressure tank, plumbing and electrical so that shouldn't count I guess ... what did you do, dig your well with a post hole digger?

Agree that those prices are pumped up for the current TV fad though. Spouse and I watch those programs. There is one guy who is a very talented carpenter, forget his name at the moment. We always laugh at the drama of last minute have-to-haves and ridiculous deadlines.

Wouldn't a nice RV fifth-wheel or similar work? You'd still need a workhorse diesel truck to go from location to location anyway and some of those RVs with the pop-outs and larger appliances are pretty snazzy. I always wonder how they get those tiny houses under low tree branches or low hanging stuff like traffic signals.
I love the idea of smaller spaces since it provides less space to put 'stuff' which ends up a pile which you don't ever look in. My current version of small is a 720 sf house, and wouldn't have one larger. If I could, I'd redesign a few places, like the big mostly useless kitchen. Maybe take half of the kitchen and make a walk in pantry. Maybe I will as I move all the stuff and then have to pile it again since there's no place to put it.

I do like the idea of being able to move on if you don't like where you are. I don't 'don't like' this area so much as I don't relate, and if there was an inexpensive way to live in a more like me place I'd try it.

But I don't see me doing a loft, unless it was halfway down the wall and all storage, with one end open. And no chance of touching the ceiling. If I can't get out easy, forget it. Small kitchen would be fine. Space for my hobbies might not work.

I don't drive, so someone would have to drive it where it went.

But the one version I really rather like is a converted bus. I can see how you'd divide it up, and know the size of a bus. If I was inclined to share with people, someone who drove would allow us to be gypsys and go where the weather was good.

The narrowness I could live with too, as the large unused room in my house is the other side of the living room. The half of it that I use, with the bedroom smaller at the end, since all it needs is space for a storage bed is about the size of the wider tiny homes. I spend 90 percent of my time in the living room which has all my stuff set up and manage.

Even if I moved from here to another house, I've ceased to see any great use for big open rooms with a couple of pieces of furnature.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-22-2017, 12:05 AM
 
Location: trapped in the body of a dying animal
3,181 posts, read 1,362,931 times
Reputation: 3203
Tiny homes have been around for a long time. They're called camping trailers.

When I see these tiny-home shows on teevee, I get the impression that these folks would balk at the idea of living in a camper. So they're re-inventing the wheel in a more cutesy (and more expensive manner).

IMO it's more about virtue-signaling than actually saving money.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-23-2017, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,857 posts, read 21,918,275 times
Reputation: 27927
Sometimes they're just tiny houses.

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.2328...7i13312!8i6656
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-23-2017, 09:20 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,770 posts, read 47,651,207 times
Reputation: 17651
Our house was a 'kit' that I assembled. Some people buy this size kit to serve as an airplane hanger. It makes a large home, though it's cost was less than some 'tiny' homes.

We are on solar-power. Some people's use of grid power makes their homes expensive to live in. Others do not pay for their electric use.

We live in Maine, a state known for having high heating bills. We tend to go through around $1,000 of firewood each year. We have previously owned homes South of Maine where our heating expenses were a lot higher. We plan to add a solar-thermal system soon, which should bring our heating expenses down to near zero.

A very large home can be inexpensive to buy. It can be cheap to power and to heat.

I do not believe that all tiny homes are less expensive than all large homes, nor that they are any less expensive to operate.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-23-2017, 09:39 PM
Status: "happy again, no longer catless! t...." (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,433 posts, read 16,760,004 times
Reputation: 16460
My house was built in 1931, but it shares much with the tiny house of today. It's a 'kit' house. You picked the house you chose, and ordered it, and every stick of wood and door and windows were delivered. I've read that the boards were numbered as well, and you simply assembled it. It also came with basic plumming. In the time you could go across town and find another house which was from the same kit.

Most kit homes were small. There were a few which were large as well. But it was the basice way most families of modest income could obtain a house. If you had little land, there were houses which today would still be tiny. If you had more, then you could get it quite ornate.

If you have one now, its remarkable for how solid and strong they are, even after 80 some years. Mind had a well done addition, which makes it 720 sf. Before it was probably more like 600sf.

I see the tiny house as todays version of the kit house. Many kit houses were very small, but families who couldn't afford more had a home. They also often had the non attached mother in law house, placed behind the family house so aged parents had a place to live, but didn't have to live in the main one.

If I was to move on, and had some land, I'd look at the modern kit houses, using modern materials. Some of them are bigger, but many are just the same size as mine with a better 'flow'. One company does the assembly in a factory, ships the house to your lot and ancors it to the foundation. What I've noticed is the interior is often exactly as the larger tiny's handle space, with a minimialist design. Many are even shotgun shapes with the same basic layout as the old ones.

I would absolutely not want to move into a nice new oversized mansion where I used maybe three rooms.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-23-2017, 10:17 PM
Status: "happy again, no longer catless! t...." (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,433 posts, read 16,760,004 times
Reputation: 16460
Quote:
Originally Posted by mschrief View Post
Rent a small travel trailer and live in for six months.

You will run away screaming.....
I moved in with some friends in my 20's. They had a fairly small house, but there was room. Problem was they wanted their privacy and I needed mine. There was a building usually used as a shed, and they cleaned it out and I moved my stuff in. I actually asked about it. It was actually one of the more comfortable experiences I've had. It was close, so food came out of their kitchen, and I had a small little box frig. I had room for a roomy bed, eating area, tv, a place for clothes, and my dog. I could come in late and not bother anyone or sleep late and not be bothered.

When I think back, while it was very different, it was one of the times in those couple of years when I really did feel quite comfortable. It also is a big part of the reason I picked a house this size for my 'retirement home'.

If I had to choose between a deluxe, large apartment sharing walls or a largish tiny home, I'd absolutely go for the tiny home.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2017, 06:23 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,531 posts, read 79,802,013 times
Reputation: 38880
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweetbottoms View Post
Hubby and I have been in discussion about tiny homes on frugality vs condo. We currently have a nearly 1200 sqft condo at $1300 a month. Very cheap for where we are (they usually run around $1700). While in discussion with my father who travels the country in a 5th wheel full time.

I don't think owning a tiny home would actually be much cheaper than a regular home but anyone want to chime in? Yes you don't have a mortgage for most of them but in its place you're adding lot rental (some up to $1000 a month if you plan on staying in one place longer term), gas, electric, food etc. With this being a fairly new movement also there aren't tons of places allowing these structures to come onto their lots. It feels like whatever you're saving in rent you're making up in lot rental and gas alone. Am I the only one who's thinking this way?
to me, owning a tiny home is just a trendy way of living in a mobile home. I doubt they would keep their value like a home built on a foundation of some kind would. For someone who likes to travel all the time, they might work well, but otherwise I see them just a another gimmick. Maybe my age is just showing .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2017, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,297 posts, read 9,157,734 times
Reputation: 10478
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
I moved in with some friends in my 20's. They had a fairly small house, but there was room. Problem was they wanted their privacy and I needed mine. There was a building usually used as a shed, and they cleaned it out and I moved my stuff in. I actually asked about it. It was actually one of the more comfortable experiences I've had. It was close, so food came out of their kitchen, and I had a small little box frig. I had room for a roomy bed, eating area, tv, a place for clothes, and my dog. I could come in late and not bother anyone or sleep late and not be bothered.

When I think back, while it was very different, it was one of the times in those couple of years when I really did feel quite comfortable. It also is a big part of the reason I picked a house this size for my 'retirement home'.

If I had to choose between a deluxe, large apartment sharing walls or a largish tiny home, I'd absolutely go for the tiny home.

My mom had a fairly large house but planned to live in a smaller one and my brother live in the 'big house'. They made a large studio out of a one car garage/workshop/carport that sounds like what you had. Brother decided he didn't want to live in Mom's house so she stayed there and I moved into the 'tiny house'. It was perfect for me and I lived there till Mom passed away six years later. I paid minimal rent which allowed me to save up to buy my own home, which is by NO means "tiny", but I love it. Over the years I have lived in mostly small places and, honestly, I like having 'room to move around' now. I have a couple of 'what do I do with them?' rooms but I like having options.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-24-2017, 08:42 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,184 posts, read 3,991,397 times
Reputation: 18959
Quote:
Originally Posted by David A Stone View Post
In theory, the tiny house movement should have resulted in a low cost way to live.

It hasn't because most people looking at them actually could afford more but think the tiny house movement is "trendy"


Thus, since it now appears on TV shows etc, the people promoting saw the opportunity to gouge.


Yep I agree 100%.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-01-2017, 04:35 PM
 
7,152 posts, read 3,824,904 times
Reputation: 10624
I actually tuned in to one of the tiny house shows on HGTV and was pleasantly surprised to find home buyers looking at already existing "tiny" (small; around 600 sf or less) houses. Seems more practical than rolling in something under 100 sf and then hoping the authorities let you set up housekeeping in it within city limits which, in most places, they won't. Something like an old vacation cottage (auto camp, they called them) on a lake or ocean would appeal to me very much. I hope more people consider this alternative and it becomes easier to choose a simpler, scaled down housing option in the not-too-distant future.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Frugal Living
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top