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Old 07-07-2017, 03:00 PM
 
3,457 posts, read 1,978,113 times
Reputation: 7833

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OP: if you intend the bike to be well used, like every day, buy the more expensive bike. If it will only be used for a half hour on Saturday, buy the cheaper.

It's all in how you use it.

As someone said, stay away from cheap multi speed bikes, I never found my 10 speed to be any better than my 3 speed, and I actually preferred my 3speed. It gave me better service, shifted better and really had all the gears I needed. My prized 10 speed only caused much more problems shifting gears, losing the chain, etc.
My 3 speed never did.

Figure out how and how much you will use it, then buy appropriately.
If you want to go riding in the woods a nice 5 speed "Mountain or trail" bike should be what you consider over a pavement bike.

Spend well, spend less in the long run.

That's being frugal, not cheap.
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Old 07-07-2017, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
8,880 posts, read 15,624,346 times
Reputation: 11449
Go to a police auction, you can buy $300 bikes in good shape for ten bucks all day long.
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Old 07-07-2017, 03:41 PM
 
9,291 posts, read 11,138,237 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
Absolutely. Never buy cheap tools. My son's a mechanic, and although he's still a pup, never buys cheap tools. Most people don't realize that mechanics--doesn't matter where they work--own most of their own tools. The business owner is usually too cheap to provide all of the necessary equipment. At least that's been his experience.
Mechanics always provide their own tools unless he is working at Jiffy Lube.......has nothing to do with cheap owners!
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Old 07-07-2017, 03:45 PM
 
9,291 posts, read 11,138,237 times
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I don't buy cheap things.......I simply don't buy!
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Old 07-08-2017, 06:41 PM
 
286 posts, read 118,629 times
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Good quality pots can out last you. I bought a cheap set when I was in college. By the end, the Teflon coating was flaking off. I bought a good quality Calphalon set with a lifetime warranty and they are still perfect.

My mom worked at the local police department and she would work the annual auction. She said there were always many bicycles.
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Old 07-08-2017, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Type 0.7 Kardashev
10,577 posts, read 6,823,128 times
Reputation: 37337
I always pay well for footwear.

I take care of my feet, and I have footwear that lasts for years. Seriously, I have a pair of North Face hiking shoes. They're beat all to hell, but I've worn them well over a thousand times over the last decade and they're still serviceable. And all the weak points on shoes - the toes that is prone to peeling away, the eyelets, the heelloops for pulling them on - are still sound. They were $110, but I've paid far less than had I cycled through half a dozen $40 pair of shoes (which wouldn't have been as kind to my feet, either). Ditto my Keene's. They're not quite as hold and I haven't worn them quite as much, but they're in great shape. And the tie-string still works and is completely unfrayed. The heel on one finally pulled away, but maybe fifty cents worth of adhesive fixed that. $95? Totally worth it.

Tools are another type of item where spending for quality is a no-brainer.
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Old 07-09-2017, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,695 posts, read 21,741,083 times
Reputation: 27747
Quote:
Originally Posted by City Guy997S View Post
Mechanics always provide their own tools unless he is working at Jiffy Lube.......has nothing to do with cheap owners!
It was a lube place that I was thinking of. A place like that should provide basic tools.
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Old 07-12-2017, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
8,880 posts, read 15,624,346 times
Reputation: 11449
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
It was a lube place that I was thinking of. A place like that should provide basic tools.
So your son works at a quick lube and you refer to him as a mechanic?
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Old 07-13-2017, 07:03 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,695 posts, read 21,741,083 times
Reputation: 27747
Quote:
Originally Posted by duster1979 View Post
So your son works at a quick lube and you refer to him as a mechanic?
He's a mechanic and used to manage a lube place. My friend who has a PhD in psychology works in sales. You have a problem with that?
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Old 07-13-2017, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
8,880 posts, read 15,624,346 times
Reputation: 11449
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
He's a mechanic and used to manage a lube place. My friend who has a PhD in psychology works in sales. You have a problem with that?
I don't have a "problem" with it. It was not my intent or desire to question your son's education, training, or ability as a mechanic.

But "mechanic" is a vocation, not a license. Unlike, say, a doctor, who is still a doctor as long as he or she maintains a license to practice medicine regardless of what he or she actually does for a living, a person must be actively working as a mechanic in order to be a mechanic. And quick lube places don't employ mechanics.

If he has worked as a mechanic elsewhere so be it, but I gathered from your previous post that the quick lube was the extent of his experience. My mistake.

And as far as your friend goes, very few people with psychology degrees work anywhere near that field. I once worked at a brokerage firm, there were more psychology majors working there than finance majors. But the same thing applies, if they aren't working as psychologists or maintaining a license, they aren't psychologists.
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