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Old 06-18-2017, 11:13 PM
 
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Could you shop more frequently for the things you throw out? Also check the temperature setting on your fridge.
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Old 06-25-2017, 02:03 PM
 
Location: North State (California)
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I buy the bags of carrots & thye last about a month, as I only use a carrot or two a day. Add some paper towel to the bag of produce, keeping it dry helps it last.

Make your own hummus you can make it for pennies compared to the premade stuff, if you also cook your own chickpeas. That way you can also vary the seasonings.

Buy the bags of frozen chicken breasts or tenders when they go on sale, then take one or tow out as needed. Grocery outlet or Sprouts sometimes have sales that work out at $1.66 a pound.
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Old 06-25-2017, 04:55 PM
 
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Cross Whole Foods of your list of go to places right off the bat.

I buy organic meats over produce, meats are injected with so many hormones and antibiotics its worth the extra money. Plus I limit my meat consumption. I buy wild caught individually vacuumed seal fish, it thaws out quick if you keep it wrapped and put it in warm water.

Buy bulk vegetables and fruit that last for a week, bag of apples, oranges, potatoes, broccoli, zucchini squash and keep them in those green produce bags, they work keeping your veggies fresh longer in the fridge.

I always keep a frozen raviolis, perogies, chicken pot pie in the freezer so you have a quick meal and don't have to order take out.

Plan your meals for the week and don't buy too much perishable food.

All the household stuff watch for sales and dollar stores. Rite Aid, Walgreens or CVS are good for tooth paste, shampoo and stuff like that, bigger selection and better prices.
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Old 06-26-2017, 12:04 PM
 
Location: Ohio
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Stop eating organic and get over your need for fancy meats.

Shop at Aldi

i wish i had $500 for 5 people, let alone 2. Geez
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Old 06-26-2017, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
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If the veggies are getting ready to go bad, toss them into the stock pot and make vegetable stock for soups and stews. A lot of kitchen scraps can go into a stock pot. Soups are very inexpensive to make and if you make too much, put some in the freezer for later or take up canning if you don't have the freezer space.

We save a lot by making a lot of stuff from scratch. Bread, mayo, soups, stews, etc. One of those roasted chickens from Costco starts out as a roast chicken dinner, then the leftovers become sandwiches and then the bones are boiled for broth and that's served with noodles and a lot of veggies. If there's still some left over, it's thickened up to where the broth is almost gravy and served over mashed potatoes. That's about five meals for two people made with one $5 chicken.

For a lot of your cleaners, see if you can replace them with less exotic substitutions. Vinegar and water instead of Windex, add a bit of scent if you don't like the vinegar smell. A squeegee instead of paper towels to clean the windows. Baking soda and hydrogen peroxide do a lot to get out stains. Get big bulk containers of soaps and pour them into a smaller jar for use.

The bigger container into a smaller one for use works for soaps as well as condiments. We get rice in 50# bags. Costco bakery will generally give you food grade buckets with tight fitting lids. Those are great for storing extra rice, flour, dried beans, etc.

We make a lot of sprouts on the windowsill. But alfalfa seeds, put two or three tablespoon fulls in a sprouting jar (or any big glass jar with some sort of screen on one end) and set it in the windowsill. In the morning, rinse and drain, lay it on it's side. Do the same thing at night. Right now we're eating fresh lettuce from the garden, can you have at least a window box for fresh lettuce?

A friend of mine used to get plastic gallon milk jugs. She'd cut a hole in the top to fit a little plastic basket that she got at the garden store. A 'net pot', I think she called it. Then she'd fill the jug with water, add a small amount of Miracle Grow, put the net pot in the hole at the top of the jug and add a peat moss disk and three lettuce seeds. As the lettuce drank the water, it's roots would grow down into the jug. Once all the water was used up in the jug the lettuce was big enough to eat. Then she'd clean it all up, add more water, Miracle Grow and seeds and start over. She had a dozen or so of these jugs going, all of them at different stages so there'd pretty much be ripe lettuce when ever she wanted it.
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Old 06-29-2017, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Mount Pleasant, SC
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"... last week I bought a pint of strawberries. They turned to mush in one day (even though I kept them dry and in the fridge). When I buy roadside berries, they last 4-5 days at least. "


Best advice on strawberries lasting: as soon as you get them in your kitchen, fill a bowl with water & add a tablespoon of any kind of vinegar. Dump the strawberries in & then right out into a colander. The vinegar will kill the mold spores waiting to bloom on the berries.
It won't matter then if you keep them cold or dry. Believe me, I'd tried all other methods but this one is the winner. Enjoy!
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Old 07-03-2017, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
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The tip for using up vegies getting old for stock/soup is a great one! Just cleaned out my vegetable crisper and made a really great soup from celery, zucchini, carrots, mushrooms, onions, garlic, used a Swanson vegetable broth. Some basil from my herb garden. Threw in some barley. Olive oil. Lots of turmeric and some cayenne. Had it for lunch...enough left over for lunch tomorrow, too. Did I tell you how good it was? Filling. Those old vegetables took on a new life.
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Old 07-03-2017, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
16,702 posts, read 20,456,636 times
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OP, I think your tastes are simply expensive. You just can't get a new Rolls Royce for cheap.

I actually think it may be cheaper for you to eat out than make food at home. If you can do some type of cheap breakfast - like if you're into oats or even eggs, you'd save money there.

But, you may find that buying something simple out, instead of buying a bunch of food that goes bad, is actually less expensive for you.

Just order water, skip the dessert.
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Old 07-03-2017, 11:18 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
72,633 posts, read 64,111,757 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BellaLind View Post
I like to read this forum, even if I'm not great at being frugal myself. I've been told I'm frugal, but compared to most here, I don't hold a candle. I could use some grocery saving tips from you experts... please.

I want to save an extra $100 a month. I need to make cuts somewhere to do this and ran some reports in Quicken. I spend about $500-$600 a month on groceries! I read in another thread where singles were spending $200 or $300 a month and I think I can make some improvements. I'm single, but I have a relative I take care of who lives with me most of the time and I buy her food too. So we are kind of a house of two. But she doesn't eat much and she also spends a lot of time with other family. She really doesn't add much to the bill other than some easy to prepare food for herself should I not be home.

My grocery bill is food and also household stuff like shampoo, soap, cleaners, etc.

I've looked at a lot of websites and I do what they list. Cook at home, from scratch. Don't buy a lot of prepared foods etc.

I can get better at buying stuff on sale, but I have a small house and don't have the space to stock up on things. I'm thinking of buying a pantry cabinet for the garage so I can store extra stuff on it. There never seem to be coupons for what I buy (generic and fresh foods).

I do have an issue with produce waste. A lot of it goes bad in a day or two. I try to cook it up quickly and reheat it as needed. But I throw away too much. Also my choices of grocery stores is "inexpensive but horrible produce" or Whole Paycheck (Whole Foods). When I visit my mom (who lives rurally) I stock up at roadside produce stands (best produce I can get at a reasonable price).

I'm also kind of a meat snob (because of what I ate growing up). Filet mignon and boneless chicken breasts, that sort of thing. I tend to buy organic chicken and beef too. I'd love suggestions for other types of meat that's cheaper and tastes just as good. Although I honestly don't buy a lot of meat.

My boyfriend bought me a Kurig and that thing is pricey! I bought a reusable pod for it and I'm going to buy cans of coffee again. Boxes of coffee pods are $8 for 12 cups.

So that's what I know. I might be able to pull things off with just that, but I'd appreciate more grocery saving tips. I also live in a high cost of living area. But I know I can be smarter about shopping.

I wish I could cut "eating out" but that only nets me an extra $45 a month.
What kind of salad dressing do you use? Trader Joe's has really cheap balsamic vinegar, and cheap grapeseed oil for cooking. I found large bottles (25 fl. oz.) of mild olive oil at Albertson's for around $3.00. I used to pay $10 for 17 fl. oz of olive oil. Trader Joe's also has inexpensive cheeses.

I shop 3x/week so produce is fresh. Salad greens stay fresh a long time, anyway.

OP, skipping eating out gets you nearly halfway to your goal. Eat out once every 6 weeks or so, rather than more regularly.
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Old 07-03-2017, 11:20 PM
 
4,554 posts, read 2,021,418 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joyeaux View Post
"... last week I bought a pint of strawberries. They turned to mush in one day (even though I kept them dry and in the fridge). When I buy roadside berries, they last 4-5 days at least. "


Best advice on strawberries lasting: as soon as you get them in your kitchen, fill a bowl with water & add a tablespoon of any kind of vinegar. Dump the strawberries in & then right out into a colander. The vinegar will kill the mold spores waiting to bloom on the berries.
It won't matter then if you keep them cold or dry. Believe me, I'd tried all other methods but this one is the winner. Enjoy!
Thanks! Can't tell you how many berries I've tossed.
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