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Old 07-22-2017, 02:49 PM
 
595 posts, read 354,630 times
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more starches

learn to buy in larger bulk and freeze


stop buying preppded food and start cooking. you're paying a lot more for convenience.
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Old 07-22-2017, 03:18 PM
 
1,372 posts, read 701,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Campfires View Post
Beans and rice.


Learn how to cook them from scratch. In other parts of the world, those two items comprises a majority of a person's calories and they are dirt cheap (hence why they are such staples in so many impoverished areas).

I don't think that he wants to live like someone from a third world country in Africa.
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Old 07-22-2017, 03:33 PM
 
3,463 posts, read 2,295,112 times
Reputation: 3952
Quote:
Originally Posted by lukas1973 View Post
I don't think that he wants to live like someone from a third world country in Africa.
Yeah, I don't think anyone does plus, that is not necessarily the OP's issue anyway. It is not that they can't afford to eat, it is just that they are trying to save some money in doing so.

I love beans myself and eat a lot of them but I can't think of the last time I ever even had any rice. It is not a balanced diet good for anyone to live on.

OP could save a lot of money just by cutting out all of the convenience and prepackaged foods which are a majority of the money they are spending. Also, if they learn to cook or make things more from scratch, freeze meals, buy more generics and/or store brands plus buy more in bulk that would help immensely as well.
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Old 07-22-2017, 03:44 PM
 
1,372 posts, read 701,729 times
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[quote=RunD1987;48924953]My wife and I we buy groceries biweekly. Usually paying $220 to $240 for 2 weeks of groceries. In the winter we usually get the bill to $180. Only difference in the winter is we do a week of soup and the following week turkey meatballs. Then 6 days of chicken in those 2 weeks.

Our grocery list and cost is as such:
Almond Milk usually store brand or name brand on sale - 2 for $6

Quote:
Yogurt usually a sale of 10 for $10 or 10 for $12. We usually pick up 20 to 24 yogurts.
Why you buy such overpriced yogurts? Reasonable priced yogurts would cost you just one third of that.

Quote:
2 bags of name brand shredded cheese - About $4-$5 for 2 bags
Just buy normal cheese and shred it with the grater yourself.

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Store brand veggie burgers 4 for $3 each
Don't buy such overpriced crap.

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Pick up 4 store brand whole wheat pasta that is about $8
One pack of store brand whole wheat pasta for $2? Go to cheaper store.

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Pick up 4 to 5 instant pouch rice for $2.50 each box
Just buy normal rice instead.

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Usually 4 store brand lettuce bags. Most sales are 2 for $5. So that's $10 there.
Don't buy such overpriced crap. And when you shop only biweekly, how do you kept the lettuce fresh?

Quote:
When can sales go on we grab mostly beans for $1 each. Like to have at least 5 cans of beans in the house. White beans, cheese, whole wheat pasta, tomatoes, and mushrooms make a great quick meal.
A can of beans for $1 and that's already on sale?

Quote:
Oatmeal usually get us 4 boxes for $2.50 each box
Just by normal oatmeal, they will cost you just a fraction.

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Grab a bag of carrots depending what is on sale. Usually the 2 pound bag is 2 for $5 or the $5 pound bag is on sale for $5.99
Buy reasonable priced carrots. Carrots cost almost nothing.

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Dressing 2 for $6
Marinades 2 for $6
Why you buy such overpriced food? And you are wondering why you have such a huge grocery bill?

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Then usually a random spice for $3
You can get it for one fourth of that.

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Then 4 bags of peanut butter pretzels for $12 total
Tub of pretzel rods for $6
Don't buy such overpriced crap food.

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Eggs usually $2.50 on sale most of the time last us 2 weeks
Don't buy fancy organic free range eggs.

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Jelly $3
Honey $5 but last us 4 weeks
Don't buy the most expensive one.

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Container of sliced olives $3.50
Don't buy organic ones.

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Bag of onions for $4
Where you can buy a bag of onions for $4? Are they wraped in gold foil? Onions cost almost nothing.

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Random times maybe once a month we splurge on a pound of turkey lunch meat and pita bread
Also once a month ice cream or store made cookies
Doesn't sound like splurging to me. More like living on the brink.

Quote:
Any advice on how to help us lower cost?
Just shop at reasonable priced grocery stores.
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Old 07-22-2017, 04:00 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
10,860 posts, read 18,892,348 times
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Greek yogurts are usually a dollar each. They've got some of the whey strained out so they've got less sugar and more protein than regular yogurt. They cost about twice as much as regular yogurt but that's because you get half as much Greek yogurt from the same volume of milk.
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Old 07-22-2017, 04:07 PM
 
595 posts, read 354,630 times
Reputation: 553
[quote=lukas1973;48927926]
Quote:
Originally Posted by RunD1987 View Post

Just shop at reasonable priced grocery stores.
Or if he's shopping for a family, get a club membership and start buying in bulk. He'd make up on the membership in a year just on that ridiculous instant pouches of rice. Buy a 20lb bag from costco and call it a day. It's also healthier cooking this way than reheating those microwave pouches.

Just about everything on your list is cheaper in bulk. Things you cannot use immediately, just freeze.

About the only indulgence on your list I'd agree with is the "Crushed garlic jar last us about 4 months cost about $5 a jar." Crushing garlic is a PITA and messy, and the jar lasts longer than the fresh garlic, which incidentally isn't that cheap either. You save money + convenience by getting that huge jar from costco.
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Old 07-22-2017, 04:12 PM
 
Location: North State (California)
28,225 posts, read 2,199,762 times
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You can cook rice & freeze it in meal size bags. Cook a big pot up on a day off. That ready made stuff is far too expensive.
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Old 07-22-2017, 08:30 PM
 
370 posts, read 207,036 times
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Wow, your main store is expensive on lots of stuff. I don't know if it's the area where you live or the store. Since you have a few shopping options, spend a little time going to each store to check everyday prices. Take along a worksheet and record the unit price each store charges for the items you usually purchase. You will quickly see the best stores to buy particular items.

You've gotten some great advice so far. I'll reiterate some of that advice just to drive the points home.

Check the flyers online of all of the local grocery stores. Plan your meals around what is on sale. Stock up when you find really good sales. Make sure you have any customer loyalty cards stores offer for cheaper prices. Print coupons at online couponing sites. Some supermarkets have digital coupons you can choose either by clipping them to your account or loading them to your loyalty card.

As others have said, you're paying more for convenience and packaging. Yogurt for $1 adds up if you eat it every day -- for two people, that's $60 a month just for yogurt. The large tubs of yogurt are usually a big saver. You can even buy 4-packs of the single cups for less than the individual cups. With Greek and Icelandic yogurt packing a much better punch than regular yogurt, you can also eat just half a cup a day. Sometimes I do that and refrigerate the other half for the next day.

Buy the canister of oats not those packets. Real oats are cheap, healthy and filling. Add half a cup to a cup of boiling water, stir on and off, and they're ready in about seven minutes.

Usually buying potatoes individually is expensive. Buy a bag. Most stores have some bagged potatoes on sale every week. Same thing for apples and oranges, go for the bags. They usually last a very long time, and I've had some bags of apples and oranges for over a month.

As I said, many of these things have already been pointed out, but they were also the things that instantly came to mind when I read your post.
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Old 07-22-2017, 09:20 PM
 
13,710 posts, read 22,832,449 times
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i can go into nearly ANY local grocery store using their weekly ad and spend less than going to Costco.

I buy a good number of the items that the OP buys and honestly, I pay a fraction of the costs that are posted above. Occasionally, I will buy privte lables and I will only buy many items when they are on sale.

I try NOT to buy enormous quantities as there is more waste.
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Old 07-22-2017, 09:53 PM
 
Location: New England
1,553 posts, read 656,609 times
Reputation: 1384
Quote:
Originally Posted by RunD1987 View Post
Trying to get grocery bill under $200 any advice...
Take $200 in cash, place your most needed stuff on the checkout first, tell the cashier you can't pay anything over $200. Let it roll. Did this myself a few weeks ago with the kids, who wanted a summer party. The amount was also $200. It worked out well. The cart had $77 more the $200 limit, and it was returned to the shelves.
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