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Old 07-04-2018, 01:25 AM
 
2,008 posts, read 1,841,947 times
Reputation: 3349

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I tried this and ended up with a fresh new love of my country, and won't ever consider moving anywhere outside the US again. Maybe visit. But, never to live.

I, like many, got into a mindset that I had to leave the entire country to get out of the situation I was in, in a particular city/county/state. But, right within our own country, there are very affordable places. And you'll understand the language, the customs, body language, can trust the police departments, as well as insurance companies and mortgage insurance, just on and on.

My advice is to keep looking for what you want within the US. And travel for fun. Been there. Wish I hadn't sold the condo first. So, add that to my advice - if you do decide to try living outside the US, rent your house for at least a year, while living in a different country (and rent there, too) and then decide if you still want to sell it and stay.
What country did you go to and what specifics did you encounter that were not as satisfactory as being in the US, if you don't mind me asking? ETA -- just read your specifics on Mexico, good lesson learned!

Last edited by fumbling; 07-04-2018 at 01:50 AM..
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Old 07-08-2018, 09:35 AM
 
Location: In a vehicle.
4,668 posts, read 2,900,486 times
Reputation: 7465
In June 2011, the average Social Security benefit was $1,180.80 per month. The maximum possible benefit for a worker retiring at age 66 in 2011 is $2,366. But to get this amount, the worker would need to earn the maximum taxable amount, currently $106,800, each year after age 21.

Which means that unless you made $$$$$$$$$$$$$ and had a pension and investments...Well, stay here :P

I'm now not feeling too bad about having to retire on possibly $869 a month....
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Old 07-08-2018, 12:36 PM
 
12,104 posts, read 16,811,522 times
Reputation: 17458
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disgustedman View Post
In June 2011, the average Social Security benefit was $1,180.80 per month. The maximum possible benefit for a worker retiring at age 66 in 2011 is $2,366. But to get this amount, the worker would need to earn the maximum taxable amount, currently $106,800, each year after age 21.

Which means that unless you made $$$$$$$$$$$$$ and had a pension and investments...Well, stay here :P

I'm now not feeling too bad about having to retire on possibly $869 a month....
It is 2018, is it not.
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Old 07-08-2018, 06:24 PM
 
440 posts, read 545,807 times
Reputation: 220
there is a town in Italy that's selling homes for like $1, but you have to fix them up and agree to live in the town as a resident.
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Old 07-29-2018, 07:36 PM
 
203 posts, read 95,348 times
Reputation: 461
When one relocates or retires outside the United States you need the actions, dress and language traits of your surroundings. When one falls short of this you are singled out. Adjustments will ensue when goods and services are purchased. You will be taken advantage of. This is known as the Yankee penalty.

Does your diet match that of your new community? If not food costs may soar, ingredients to make things from scratch may not be obtainable. Eating out may be outside the budget and it may not have healthy offerings. At least you won't have to tip.

Will you shun vehicle ownership? Fuel and insurance costs can be astronomical. Are you willing to jump aboard public transportation and is it available to regional places you wish to visit? Is an airport within reasonable distance. To some this is a deal breaker.

Are you eligible to sign up for health care in a national system? Premiums are far less than the US but wait times can be time consuming, drugs are not often in supply while counterfit medications are often administered. Your physician may speak English but the staff won't be fluent. Barriers as this need not be taken lightly. On the other hand, not being part of the system may be an advantage. Cash may lower your bill. Services may be affordable compared to what billing in America would charge. Would this be in ones budget? Private health care insurance plans are not cheap for those of retirement age. Research these avenues so you are completely informed.

Test the territory for many months, live the life and realize if switching from tourist to potential resident is the desired fit.
The lifestyle you current walk may have more quality than what you realize. Go all in on self-discovery for this out-of-country change.

Last edited by auto camper; 07-29-2018 at 07:39 PM.. Reason: forgotten sentence
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Old 07-29-2018, 07:40 PM
 
Location: southern california
55,237 posts, read 73,048,045 times
Reputation: 47508
This is a great plan the only thing wrong with it is that human beings age -while you are in cruise mod taking it easy -maybe even some recreational chemical activity -you are aging and all your friends are working and developing their job skills for the most part sober -and moving forward in their careers -when you come back in 10 years -you will be much older and where they were 10 years ago -but of course they are not-
You are now an old guy with no work experience and maybe even a few vices
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Old 08-01-2018, 06:34 PM
 
4,555 posts, read 5,438,349 times
Reputation: 4745
Iíve heard Somalia is very inexpensive and lots of sun! As long as you get in with the right warlord, itís not that unsafe and a lot of people take up piracy as a fun side hobby when theyíre retired!
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Old 11-22-2018, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Tx
326 posts, read 275,089 times
Reputation: 305
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I tried this and ended up with a fresh new love of my country, and won't ever consider moving anywhere outside the US again. Maybe visit. But, never to live.

I, like many, got into a mindset that I had to leave the entire country to get out of the situation I was in, in a particular city/county/state. But, right within our own country, there are very affordable places. And you'll understand the language, the customs, body language, can trust the police departments, as well as insurance companies and mortgage insurance, just on and on.

My advice is to keep looking for what you want within the US. And travel for fun. Been there. Wish I hadn't sold the condo first. So, add that to my advice - if you do decide to try living outside the US, rent your house for at least a year, while living in a different country (and rent there, too) and then decide if you still want to sell it and stay.
I say rent for 3 years
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Old 11-23-2018, 12:46 PM
 
6,324 posts, read 6,724,361 times
Reputation: 8818
Quote:
But I'm sure the Nordic countries' happiness is a result of a lot of factors. Good health care is a big one, I'm sure. Good environment. Good schools. Decent economy. Beautiful countries. Culture (art, movies). Low crime.
I"m not sure, but don't they also have very high taxes -- at rates Americans would balk at paying. I wouldn't mind paying that level of taxes if I could get all the benefits the Finns, Danes and others get....and be confident our lawmakers weren't wasting a good part of the revenue.

I'm sure there must be corruption and waste in Scandinavian countries also, but if there is -- people are still getting the services the taxes are supposed to cover.

As for retiring abroad. To live forever? No. Live, say, half a year in the US and half a year abroad? Sure. I'd think about that during the younger part of retirement. But I'm single and I have no family abroad so when older I'd want to be back home.
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Old 11-25-2018, 05:30 PM
 
106 posts, read 51,174 times
Reputation: 304
i have a house in thailand. i have lived there on and off throughout the years. eventually, i will totally retire there. but i need something to occupy my time, like a business and to provide a basic income. doing nothing but drinking all day in bars get old quick. been there done that.
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