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Old 05-02-2018, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Gilbert, Arizona
2,600 posts, read 1,005,428 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
I remember being about two years old and instructed by my mother to only use four sheets of toilet paper. (seriously!) I remember "making do" with cardboard boxes for toys, and comic books went through my older brothers, then me, then to my cousins. If something like a toy was no longer useable, I salvaged parts off it.

What do you remember from early childhood that influenced you?
0.

My frugality comes from seeing my parents fight over money and fight with family over money. I'm way more fiscally conservative than they are cause of it.
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Old 05-03-2018, 01:46 AM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
2,168 posts, read 797,279 times
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Most of it. My parents were married in 1931, so they started homemaking at the peak of the depression.

But I think there is a difference in philosophy. They were frugal as an economic imperative. I follow the same habits as a principle. First, of disciplining myself to accept a simpler lifestyle (just in case some day that's all there is), and second, to offset our cultural epidemic of waste.

I was just thinking today, 40% of all human-edible food brought to harvest is never eaten. The world produces enough food for ten billion people. Six billion get their nutrition, one billion goes hungry, and four billion could be fed by what is wasted. If I grab a half a happy meal out of the BK thankyou bin, Ive reduced the waste to the needs of 3,999,999,999.
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Old 05-04-2018, 04:20 AM
 
Location: New England
211 posts, read 150,987 times
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Both parents were children of the Great Depression, both grew up in poor, but loving households. My grandparents on my dad's side lived in town but had chickens, rabbits and a big garden. Growing up we always had a big garden, we still do now and will as long as we can walk and stoop over. Mom stayed home and dad had a good job. Mom sewed, refinished antiques and helped my brother and I build go carts and other mechanical devices. My dad wasn't good with tools other than a shovel and hoe, but was good at making and investing money. So yes, my brother and I learned from our parents to be good savers. We both married people with the same values thankfully. A little luck never hurts either as my dad would say, "Sometimes it's better to be lucky than smart"
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Old 05-04-2018, 08:59 AM
 
Location: All Over
3,971 posts, read 4,195,107 times
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My dad was always a big spender nothing but the best, he had a decent income so it worked out fine for him. My mother was a bit more frugal but didn't take it overboard. I remember as a kid wanting a fitted baseball hat like the pros wore. I remember my mom took me to a sports store and wanted to buy me kind of a painters hat style hat, of course I wanted one like my favorite players had but that one was 20 and the other was like 8 so I got the cheaper one. Some things like that kinda rubbed off on me, through my early and mid 20's I wasted money, after climbing out of credit card debt and going through some hard times I'm definitely a saver.
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Old 05-04-2018, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Central IL
13,362 posts, read 7,121,412 times
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My dad was bipolar and occasionally went on spending binges...not "hooker and blow" binges but buying a new rider lawn mower when he had no need to...buying a Lincoln Continental with all power everything (in 1970 something!)...taking my mom on some pretty luxurious vacations.

He didn't make us destitute and I got my love of travel from him. But - I save a hefty portion now even though I will have a decent pension. I don't want to worry like my parents did after a binge was over and the depression hit. When my dad died my mom didn't have a lot by way of savings and I don't want to be in that situation, especially since I have no kids to help me out.
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Old 05-10-2018, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,388 posts, read 42,713,043 times
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Some of it but probably not all of it. Parents were frugal, grew up as kids in the Depression. I was always taught to make the most of my money, although not much about how to make more money.

An uncle on my Mom's side lived across the road from us. I always knew, that he earned more money than my Dad did, but, it was obvious they didn't live as well as we did. It's only a slight exaggeration to say the reason behind this is that his wife was a financial idiot, while my Mom was a financial wizard. We ate what Mom cooked (quite skillfully) from scratch, mostly, while they ate Kentucky Fried and similar. We had one car and one truck, Dad used the truck on his job, the cars were plain Jane Chevys, couple of them bought used, one bought new, but they ran them "till the wheels fell off". Across the road, they had a big fleet of various cars, on any given day some ran and some didn't, all in poor shape. But they kept enough of them running to burn a lot of gas. Etc.

But my sister is not as tight-fisted as I am. Just differences in personality.
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Old 05-10-2018, 05:18 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
17,989 posts, read 17,140,226 times
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My mother grew up poor during the Depression because her dad died suddenly in 1929. They had plenty of money before that. My dad grew up with "enough" but his dad had escaped the poverty of working in the sweat shops in England so there was misery and poverty within memory.

My mother was traumatized by the loss of her dad and the onset of dire poverty. That influenced me so that I can't throw food away. I have to let it nearly rot in the fridge before I can finally throw it out. Otherwise, I just use commonsense and have never spent beyond my means. I save up or put it on a cc that gives points, knowing I can pay it off when it's due.

I shop very carefully and read reviews before buying. It's serving me well in retirement where I have to be careful of money, but it served me well when I was working and did have money. No different. Waste not, want not.
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Old 05-11-2018, 02:59 AM
 
24,718 posts, read 26,785,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
First hand is the best experience.
Some things are best not learned first hand. After getting into a relationship with someone who was a financial train wreck, I can see the benefit of arranged marriage, even if I don't fully support it.
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Old 05-11-2018, 03:03 AM
 
24,718 posts, read 26,785,278 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by man4857 View Post
0.

My frugality comes from seeing my parents fight over money and fight with family over money. I'm way more fiscally conservative than they are cause of it.
I always find it interesting that some people, like you, rebel (in a good way) against what their parents did, yet most other people seem to repeat the dysfunctional pattern.

I think it would be interesting to do a study on 'financial rebels' like you. Why is it that some people seem to see the mess for what it is and others just remain mired in it their whole lives?
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Old 05-15-2018, 07:42 PM
 
Location: Florida
4,379 posts, read 2,426,594 times
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My father hated financing anything, and I have largely inherited that. It is about 28 years since we financed a car. I would not retire until the mortgage was paid off.
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