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Old 07-09-2018, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
2,168 posts, read 797,279 times
Reputation: 4348

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For example, one can be environmentally frugal. Like using the blank backs of junk mail for printer paper. Or just time-frugal, by thinking of a more efficient way to double task.

This morning, I saw a post in CD that someone replied to. There were six YouTube videos in the post. The person replying just hit the Quote button, enclosed the entire post in the quote box, and said "I agree". I mean, how frugal is that, with bandwidth?

People frugal with money are probably also constitutionally frugal in other ways.
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Old 07-09-2018, 07:47 PM
 
1,438 posts, read 510,672 times
Reputation: 4749
Good idea about using the blank backs of some junk mail for printer paper. I had not thought of it before, but I could do that to print out crochet patterns rather than using new paper.
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Old 07-09-2018, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Tyler, Texas
133 posts, read 50,077 times
Reputation: 801
Hi Cebuan, great topic!

I am frugal, by necessity. I prefer to be self employed, and sometimes my income leaves little left after bills.
I recycle so much of my already reduced output of garbage is so small every week. I too utilize my junk mail to
use the envelopes for scratch paper and such. I also enjoy a meatless diet, that saves a ton of money. The best
thing I ever did was downsize into a very cute house that is maybe one thousand square feet technically, but very
small even for one person. I have one small walk in closet, so my clothing is pared down to how many hangers
fit inside with enough room to push hangers out of the way to view what is available. Most of those clothes are
purchased at bargain stores such as Walmart. I also made the choice to have one child, keeping track of one child
was so much easier than if I had two to raise. I have one smaller dog and one cat. My car is a 2003 model with
almost 2k on the odometer, but it is a great brand and model so I keep it fully insured with a 500 dollar deductible.
Insurance is expensive where I live, so just carrying the minimum car insurance does not save as much so I just
overpay a bit for peace of mind in lieu of car payments.

I am always puzzled whenever I hear a person who lives on a budget tell me that they spent outrageous
amounts of money on things like vacuums or exercise machines or furniture or whatever. I enjoy quality just
as much as anyone, but even buying quality one can refrain from spending too much. I try to think about any
purchase as in how much will it cost me per use and will I use it enough to justify the expense. Other ways
that I am frugal are I color my own hair, pay 20 bucks max for a cut and am very much a DIY'er to the best
of my ability. I would not change my habits too much if I suddenly became a millionaire overnight. I see
frugality and careful living as a very doable exchange in return for so much freedom in my life. I think I
equate lavish spending as careless and sloppy. I am not a fan of careless and sloppy. I just never believe
that anyone can do anything for me better if I pay them for a service, UNLESS that service is something I
cannot do well, such as electrician or plumber. I would rather shell out bucks for safely than for something
I consider non essential such as paying for a meal out that I can make myself cheaper and far better for less.
I prefer to live a frugal lifestyle so I can afford to pay a mechanic because I have not wasted the money on
something I consider non essential.
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Old 07-09-2018, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
16,723 posts, read 20,470,484 times
Reputation: 30705
Quote:
Originally Posted by tigermomma View Post
Hi Cebuan, great topic!

I am frugal, by necessity. I prefer to be self employed, and sometimes my income leaves little left after bills.
I recycle so much of my already reduced output of garbage is so small every week. I too utilize my junk mail to
use the envelopes for scratch paper and such. I also enjoy a meatless diet, that saves a ton of money. The best
thing I ever did was downsize into a very cute house that is maybe one thousand square feet technically, but very
small even for one person. I have one small walk in closet, so my clothing is pared down to how many hangers
fit inside with enough room to push hangers out of the way to view what is available. Most of those clothes are
purchased at bargain stores such as Walmart. I also made the choice to have one child, keeping track of one child
was so much easier than if I had two to raise. I have one smaller dog and one cat. My car is a 2003 model with
almost 2k on the odometer, but it is a great brand and model so I keep it fully insured with a 500 dollar deductible.
Insurance is expensive where I live, so just carrying the minimum car insurance does not save as much so I just
overpay a bit for peace of mind in lieu of car payments.

I am always puzzled whenever I hear a person who lives on a budget tell me that they spent outrageous
amounts of money on things like vacuums or exercise machines or furniture or whatever. I enjoy quality just
as much as anyone, but even buying quality one can refrain from spending too much. I try to think about any
purchase as in how much will it cost me per use and will I use it enough to justify the expense. Other ways
that I am frugal are I color my own hair, pay 20 bucks max for a cut and am very much a DIY'er to the best
of my ability. I would not change my habits too much if I suddenly became a millionaire overnight. I see
frugality and careful living as a very doable exchange in return for so much freedom in my life. I think I
equate lavish spending as careless and sloppy. I am not a fan of careless and sloppy. I just never believe
that anyone can do anything for me better if I pay them for a service, UNLESS that service is something I
cannot do well, such as electrician or plumber. I would rather shell out bucks for safely than for something
I consider non essential such as paying for a meal out that I can make myself cheaper and far better for less.
I prefer to live a frugal lifestyle so I can afford to pay a mechanic because I have not wasted the money on
something I consider non essential.
I admit, as soon as I can afford one, I really want a robot vacuum cleaner to help me deal with dog hair. I can't physically wrangle a giant vacuum cleaner anymore, and my lightweight one just doesn't pick it all up. It really needs to be vacuumed up more often, but I don't have it in me. I can't wait to be able to just turn on a robot every day to tackle it for me.

That said, I've been saving up to buy lumber and hardware to make myself a table for my craft room - which will be my first attempt at building something like that - and today, when I went to our refuse room to toss garbage, someone had left the perfect size table out for free. Wahoo! I cleaned it up, tightened up the bolts so the legs wouldn't wiggle, and bought some nice casters for it from Harbor Freight for $16. Voila! I was expecting it to cost me around $150 to build one the way I wanted to. This one won't be as perfect as the one I had planned, but it's going to work just fine.

So, see? I just saved almost enough for a robot vacuum cleaner. Maybe for Christmas for myself this year, I'll get one.
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Old 07-09-2018, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Florida -
8,238 posts, read 9,994,274 times
Reputation: 15081
There's perhaps another side to the "frugality is not always just about money" discussion; for example, when it comes to "value" versus "price."

When it comes to buying things, I don't really worry much about the price, except, I do expect the value to justify a higher price.

If it doesn't, I may not buy the item, ... not because I can't afford it or am unwilling to spend that much money, but, because of the principle of not paying more than something is worth --- just because I can.
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Old 07-10-2018, 03:33 AM
 
Location: Florida
18,290 posts, read 18,533,242 times
Reputation: 20966
Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
For example, one can be environmentally frugal. Like using the blank backs of junk mail for printer paper. Or just time-frugal, by thinking of a more efficient way to double task.

This morning, I saw a post in CD that someone replied to. There were six YouTube videos in the post. The person replying just hit the Quote button, enclosed the entire post in the quote box, and said "I agree". I mean, how frugal is that, with bandwidth?

People frugal with money are probably also constitutionally frugal in other ways.
It's also a 'waste' in other ways..... the other readers time!
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Old 07-10-2018, 05:34 AM
 
Location: Central IL
13,359 posts, read 7,121,412 times
Reputation: 31053
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I admit, as soon as I can afford one, I really want a robot vacuum cleaner to help me deal with dog hair. I can't physically wrangle a giant vacuum cleaner anymore, and my lightweight one just doesn't pick it all up. It really needs to be vacuumed up more often, but I don't have it in me. I can't wait to be able to just turn on a robot every day to tackle it for me.

That said, I've been saving up to buy lumber and hardware to make myself a table for my craft room - which will be my first attempt at building something like that - and today, when I went to our refuse room to toss garbage, someone had left the perfect size table out for free. Wahoo! I cleaned it up, tightened up the bolts so the legs wouldn't wiggle, and bought some nice casters for it from Harbor Freight for $16. Voila! I was expecting it to cost me around $150 to build one the way I wanted to. This one won't be as perfect as the one I had planned, but it's going to work just fine.

So, see? I just saved almost enough for a robot vacuum cleaner. Maybe for Christmas for myself this year, I'll get one.
I love when that happens! ...and always wonder what they were thinking to throw such a thing away - but also grateful that they did.
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Old 07-10-2018, 11:16 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
20,999 posts, read 25,750,723 times
Reputation: 39380
I don't think of it as frugal, but I am environmentally conscience. No wasting of water, paper, materials, fuel..... but I suppose a side effect is some saving of money.

As for spending big money on furniture and vacuums, I consider it more frugal to buy what does the job and will last. A good leather sofa from a quality company will last for many years and give good back support.and not have the cushions collapse, nor the frame break.

I've got dogs and I want a vacuum that will scoop up the dog hair with one pass so I don't have to keep going over the same spot over and over. There is a lot of difference in vacuums and the cheap ones aren't efficient. Nor are they light. It's a lot easier on the back to use a light vacuum.

But, yes, OP. I agree. There is a lot more to being frugal than just money.
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Old 07-10-2018, 11:21 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
20,999 posts, read 25,750,723 times
Reputation: 39380
I had to come back to say this about furniture: I am not buying used upholstered furniture off the internet classifieds. There is way too much risk of bedbugs or roaches. Save a few hundred on junk furniture and spend several hundred on pest extermination. No thanks.
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Old 07-10-2018, 02:23 PM
 
Location: on the wind
4,135 posts, read 1,540,807 times
Reputation: 14729
My dad was notoriously frugal to the point it made no practical sense. He would repeatedly buy crap items. He'd whine about how poorly they worked. When they would break down he wouldn't repair them but wouldn't toss them either. When we cleared out his house I found no less than 22 broken phones.

He brought home a few furniture pieces left by former tenants of an apartment he and a business partner owned. Didn't like them, they weren't comfortable and he didn't really need them, but he couldn't pass up something he'd get for free instead of buying what he really wanted.

He'd take his car to the local cut rate mechanic who never seemed to be able to fix whatever the problem was, so he'd nurse a poorly running car and complain about it for years. Yet, I would find piles of carefully-washed and folded cling wrap pieces in a drawer. Piles of one-use plastic utensils, microwave dishes and plates in the cupboards never used after the original food was gone. Tiny portions of left over food crammed in the back of the fridge or freezer.

Just like his neighbors, he had trouble with ants or other small bugs but never did anything to prevent them from getting into the house itself. Termites were obvious inside, but he'd just spray the individuals with Black Flag or Raid instead of have the house routinely treated. We also found at least 10 spray cans of pesticide inside.
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