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Old 09-06-2018, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Floyd Co, VA
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Having a stand alone freezer means never having a panic attack because you've run out of ice cream and it's 2 AM and no stores are open. LOL
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Old 09-06-2018, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PacoMartin View Post
If you haven't got the budget to spend many thousands of dollars on meat or fish, than you'll never make it pay off. Also keep in mind that you have to keep that freezer running in the event of a prolonged blackout that lasts several days
Grid down blackouts that last 3 or 4 days are fairly routine here in rural parts of the East Coast.

In our town, to go back to a month without a power outage would require looking back many years. We moved here in 2005, you would need to go back before that, to find a month-long period of continuous grid power.
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Old 09-06-2018, 10:08 PM
 
Location: South Bay Native
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I have an upright freezer and it is a godsend. Whenever rib eye goes on sale for $4.77, chicken breasts for 99c, or pork loin for $1.99, I'm going to buy a large quantity and freeze it. We also cook large quantities on the weekends, freeze portions for later use. If I feel like it, I can buy an entire ice cream sheet cake and not have to worry about where to put it when I get home. We save hundreds this way.
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Old 09-06-2018, 10:41 PM
 
Location: The World
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
Grid down blackouts that last 3 or 4 days are fairly routine here in rural parts of the East Coast.

In our town, to go back to a month without a power outage would require looking back many years. We moved here in 2005, you would need to go back before that, to find a month-long period of continuous grid power.
I live in North Carolina, and routine blackouts aren't common here. (At least not in my area).

However, I do think about hurricanes when I think about stocking up on a ton of food in a big deep freezer. Power can go out for days. The longest in my lifetime that I remember going without power because of a hurricane was for 2 weeks.

Even without a deep freezer, when I know there are hurricanes brewing out there, I'm hesitant to stock up on more than weeks' worth of frozen or refrigerated food or so. When they say one is pointed in our direction, I often cook up what I can.
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Old 09-07-2018, 12:28 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkmax View Post
Do your noodles get mushy? I love goulash and would love to freeze it like that (I do freeze a lot of things), but I've always heard that freezing noodles is a no-no. (Potatoes, too)
No, they aren't mushy (not al dente crisp, but fine). When making big batches of goulash I do wait to start cooking the noodles, cook them alone in a pot for no more than seven minutes and add them into the already finished and cooling rest of the ingredients. Otherwise they continue to cook too much. The mix goes in flattened sandwich bags, ten or twelve ounces per bag. Those bags go in gallon "mother" bags of seven or eight, labelled and dated. To defrost one of them - one minute in the microwave while still in the sandwich bag to partially defrost, then removed and broken into a bowl, with the bowl covered with a wet coffee filter and then back in the microwave for another two or three minutes to finish.

I get away with freezing smashed potatoes in shepherd's pie, but the beef and corn cover the sin. FWIW, if you hate peeling potatoes, boil them in the jacket, drain the pot, then cut one in half across the waist of the midline, place on a cutting board or plate with the cut side down, and then use your finger tips to quickly and gently squeeze and pull up on the peel. It'll slide right up and off on russets that haven't started to eye from age. Repeat for the others. It is incredibly fast and easy, though you might want to wear light gloves (like exam gloves) if you aren't used to the heat.
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Old 09-07-2018, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
Excellent points. Much the same can be said for pantries though. I've had stuff in pantries that had to get tossed
Totally agree. The difference is that one doesn't actively acquire a pantry, the house has it, and one doesn't "pay" to run the pantry, its just part of the house.

But as you and others mentioned, the big thing is the advanced food prep, and convenience of having a decently large store.
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Old 09-07-2018, 09:19 AM
 
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We bought a house with a 19 cubic foot refrigerator. We were NOT going to buy a freezer. However, a neighbor offered us a nearly new small upright freezer for $25. We generally turn it on in September and try to shut it down in June for the summer months as we travel a lot. Shutting it down each year forces us to use up stuff

What do we store in the freezer:

1) Frozen meals (chilis, soups, stews, etc.)
2) Bulk meat purchases - we buy spiral hams for $0.49-0.79/lb after the holidays, pork and beef cubes, etc.
3) Bakery buys as the closest one is about 35 miles away.
4) We purchase 70# produce for $12. We freeze a lot of vegetables (especially green beans and tomatoes) in lieu of canning.
5) My DW is an orthopedic mess and requires a lot of assorted ice packs.
6) I make a lot of soups. Having a freezer allows me to buy a lot of bones, especially pork bones for pho.

My average electric bill is about $50-55/ month and decreases sightly each year so we have covered teh additional cost of running the freezer.
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Old 09-07-2018, 09:57 AM
 
Location: In the middle of nowhere
341 posts, read 353,279 times
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We have several freezers. I live in the McGrath, Alaska on the Iditarod trail where we hunt for moose, and bear. We also fish. Our freezers get regularly rotated and old items get used up. if there is anything that is old, it goes to the neighbors dog or chickens, which is very little.We also store things like coffee beans, cheese, and fruit in it, all dated. It costs around $10 a month to run each of the freezers that are 14-17 cf each. Have a couple of small 5cf freezers that have things like fat for adding to sausage, ect. We regularly give things to neighbors and the same to us. We are able to turn off the freezers for 4 months or so during the winter when temps are below freezing as these are all outside. ( some of the freezers have run for over 10 years.)
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Old 09-11-2018, 05:27 PM
 
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We have one.

We purchase food in bulk when on sale. We label it and put the date on it so that we rotate the selection. It comes in handy in the winter. The grocery store is not far, but it can be so cold that you don't feel going out, you don't want to order on-line and pay extra fees and when you are not feeling well, you have some food stored properly.

Also, if you have unexpected guests visiting you, you have stored food in the freezer and you can whip something up to serve your guests.
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Old 09-15-2018, 01:08 AM
 
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Well, for us it was just necessary because we eat a lot of frozen dinners, I use frozen fruit bags for my protein shakes, and even the nicest normal fridges only have a small freezer so we got a deep freezer for the garage. I will say that I'd like to ditch it when we move, though, because some of the houses we are looking at have those huge double size fridge / freezer situations where the freezer is just as big as the fridge. That would be sufficient for us and a lot nicer. It's not awesome having to go to the garage for stuff, it's just the situation at present.
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