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Old 10-31-2018, 09:15 AM
 
854 posts, read 242,587 times
Reputation: 2046

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Quote:
Originally Posted by galaxyhi View Post
The cable company knows how to get around streamers!

Before I switched to Google Fiber I called the cable company and asked about the cost of an Internet-only plan. It cost more than what I was paying for their internet PLUS bundled programming. Crazy. So I switched to Google Fiber.
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Old 10-31-2018, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
4,705 posts, read 1,545,044 times
Reputation: 6799
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocko20 View Post
Streaming services are now as bloated, packaged, and overpriced as cable services.
No, not really. That they've started down this road is a disappointment to consumers, but streaming is still "free" in many senses.

It's no-cost free if you view your internet connection as an essential household utility and not just the entertainment connection.

It can be no-cost free if you don't subscribe to any pay channels - and there's still a LOT of free (== ad driven) stuff. Even Vudu has a free section.

It has controlled cost in that you can subscribe, month to month, for the services you want, and in a wide range of PPV offerings. That is, you pay $5 twice a month for movies you want, not $20 a month for a "premium channel" that shows you want they want.

That the bundle providers have moved in and thus prevented a full cafeteria model where you could pick and choose your channels - such as the ESPN set for $5 a month, not some massive, bloated "sports package" for $25 - is a loss, but the flexibility of the streaming model keeps it from being an all-or-nothing deal like local cable.

Don't subscribed to a bundle just because you're addicted to one channel you can't get any other way. Move on. It's just TV. Maybe a mass "meh" at the cable model will break it.
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Old 10-31-2018, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
4,705 posts, read 1,545,044 times
Reputation: 6799
Quote:
Originally Posted by galaxyhi View Post
The problem IS. the cable company here jacks up the price fir internet connection only.
Quote:
Originally Posted by athena53 View Post
Before I switched to Google Fiber I called the cable company and asked about the cost of an Internet-only plan. It cost more than what I was paying for their internet PLUS bundled programming. Crazy. So I switched to Google Fiber.
The idea that cable companies charge "the same" or more for internet-only is not generally true. That's how they present it, but the real economics are as murky as new-car buying. For one thing, you can't compare teaser or introductory or come-on rates with a flat cost; the cable company counts on the many people who let the intro rates run out and pay several months to several years of non-discounted prices to make up any "lost" revenue. They know that every active customer is going to generate more income in PPV, added services, even late fees and the like, and many people overlook things like taxes and equipment fees - their cable is "only $59" when they actually write a monthly check for $80.

The first thing to do when you decide to cut cable is do your homework. Research ALL the internet options available to your location. There are often ones that you wouldn't consider or forgot about as a "cable" customer because you were comparing channel packages. You don't care about channel packages any more, or phone service, or alarm service, or any of the add-on fluff. You care about decent, reliable, good-value internet broadband and nothing else.

The second thing is to realize you don't need to pay one extra dollar for "high speed" internet, no matter what the cable marketing department has brat-slapped you into believing. Shop the lowest tiers of speed, the ones you have to scroll down and click down to find. Few companies offer anything below 24-25mbps, and often that as a bargain or basic or even lifeline rate. It's fast enough for 99% of households. 10-15mpbs is fast enough for single-viewer-at-a-time households. If you switch to internet and insist on paying extra for 50-100-150-"super boost" or whatever, you probably put premium gas in your mower, too.

The third thing is both more subtle and more important (IMVHO): it's better to pay for a service you totally control and can't be yanked around on, rather than "the same" or more on services that are maddeningly shell-gamed on flimsy technical and "improvement" bases every month. No one who's had cable very long is without stories of channels disappearing, moving, being resorted into other packages (so that you have to add them to your cost list) etc. With nothing but bare-bones broadband, you're completely in control. Comcast et al. haven't been able to bug or maneuver me for decades... what's that worth?
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Old 12-07-2018, 03:18 AM
 
79 posts, read 17,626 times
Reputation: 124
I do not subscribe to any service. I so rarely watch free to air TV that stations and networks would have gone broke decades ago if too many others behaved similarly.

I can read at about 10x the rate someone can talk so I find that many internet sites can provide not only the information but also more thorough and wide ranging analysis and accessible to me in half the time. I also have access to an excellent public library about 5 minutes walk away. If I want to catch up on a relatively new show, I can actually borrow the movie or series on DVD. If I quickly lose interest ( as regularly happens) all I have wasted is an hour or two of my time.
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Old 12-07-2018, 07:08 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
35,527 posts, read 43,737,341 times
Reputation: 58926
Friends enjoy the Amazon that comes with their Amazon Prime. We only have Netflix, and we get our $11. worth from it.
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Old 12-12-2018, 06:21 PM
 
1,455 posts, read 585,274 times
Reputation: 2355
I love Netflix. I also have Prime Video, but I don't like the shows as much. I have cable from Comcast, but I never watch it. I only have it because the bundle with cable and internet is cheaper than buying internet by itself.
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Old 12-12-2018, 06:33 PM
 
10,708 posts, read 6,920,484 times
Reputation: 11342
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lekrii View Post
I haven't had cable TV for years. Netflix, Amazon Prime Video (and I have Hulu too, now that they have it bundled with Spotify) work for me, along with digital antennas.
Me too I dumped it and just trying to keep my internet bill low, today they wanted to go from $30 a month to $70, the lowest they offered with the retention department was $40 so I had no choice.

I have no other service. I have an antenna on my living room TV for local channels, It's a smart TV that has Xumo free TV which are clips from news channels mostly, what I watch from the day before. Online I try to watch the news channels thru free online services when they are up. Also i watch some TV shows the next day online after the commercials are taken out so that's good. I'm watching less TV it's become so bad.
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Old 12-20-2018, 09:05 PM
 
1,001 posts, read 1,212,482 times
Reputation: 1734
I cut the cord 5 months ago after experimenting with it for 2 years. Cancelled dish Network. Got DirecTV now $40 for 100 channels. Savings $80 a month.
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Old 12-21-2018, 03:46 AM
 
9,284 posts, read 9,524,773 times
Reputation: 4841
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocko20 View Post
Streaming services are now as bloated, packaged, and overpriced as cable services.
A network needs to get more money for their channel if they are selling to a smaller base. So if ESPN gets $9 in affiliate fees for every one of 60 million cable TV households (packages sell for $100 or more), you can guarantee that they are getting more than $9 from Sling TV which has only 4 million customers and sells packages that start at $25.

It's just basic economics.

The disruptive business practices is the Video on Demand libraries being offered by Netflix and HBO, Showtime, and Hulu. The presumption is that you can get news, weather and sports from an antenna service or just from the web, and you just are looking for entertainment.
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Old 12-27-2018, 12:53 AM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
7,102 posts, read 12,568,757 times
Reputation: 29835
We have cable but also have roku. I love my roku. Right now I have 75 free channels to watch movies and regular shows, plus streaming music. I sleep with the TV on all night so, before I "slip into my coma", I'll switch to one of my music channels. Not the video ones just music. I can doze right off to Count Basie or some of my favorite oldies
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