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Old 12-02-2018, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,000 posts, read 1,941,982 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallysmom View Post
And the laundry spray degreaser Its Awesome! It really is. I like the smaller bottle because we go through spray bottles in our business.

Dollar tree cards are now Hallmark cards.
LA's Totally Awesome cleaning products live up to their brand billing. I use their all-purpose cleaner full strength, not diluted as the bottle recommends. I've had no issues using it that way, and it really works. But it probably works well diluted too.

I've said in the past that between Hallmark Cards and Russell Stover chocolates, Kansas City owns Valentine's Day (both companies are headquartered there; one of my high school classmates was from the family that owned Russell Stover until they sold it to Swiss chocolate-maker Lindt). Now I see Hallmark is staking its claim to the bargain bins as well as the drugstore card aisles.
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Old 12-02-2018, 08:50 AM
 
11,593 posts, read 19,751,987 times
Reputation: 18499
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
LA's Totally Awesome cleaning products live up to their brand billing. I use their all-purpose cleaner full strength, not diluted as the bottle recommends. I've had no issues using it that way, and it really works. But it probably works well diluted too.

I've said in the past that between Hallmark Cards and Russell Stover chocolates, Kansas City owns Valentine's Day (both companies are headquartered there; one of my high school classmates was from the family that owned Russell Stover until they sold it to Swiss chocolate-maker Lindt). Now I see Hallmark is staking its claim to the bargain bins as well as the drugstore card aisles.
I had no idea Russell Stover was Lindt now. Yum.

And from my perspective Hallmark is smart. Several Hallmarks have closed near me, and I know I stopped buying all my cards there. I buy cute glittery pop up cards from Cost Plus for the grand niblings, or hit Papyrus for cards that are different for my aunt. I hit Hallmark once a year for grand niblings numbered birthday cards with stickers or cards that have cut out hats. I dont mind spending a bit on those cards.

The rest of the time, I hit the Dollar Tree. To me, a card is the delivery system for the birthday check. And I like cards with a bit of glitter, which I dont mind applying myself. A toothpick, a dab of glue and diamond dust make me happy.
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Solly says Be nice!
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Old 12-02-2018, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Brawndo-Thirst-Mutilator-Nation
15,728 posts, read 15,676,191 times
Reputation: 11566
OK, bought 3 pair of socks for a buck. Not the greatest quality, but they will do. And hey, socks, even the pricey ones, don't last that long anyways.
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Old 12-02-2018, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
4,000 posts, read 1,941,982 times
Reputation: 2518
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallysmom View Post
I had no idea Russell Stover was Lindt now. Yum.
Just as Russell Stover Candies did with the Whitman's Sampler when it acquired its Philadelphia-based maker, Lindt is keeping the Russell Stover brand name and product line alive, no doubt because of its wide name recognition in the United States.

I don't eat a lot of chocolates, so I can't tell you whether the quality of Russell Stover chocolates has improved since the sale.
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Old 01-07-2019, 12:08 PM
 
387 posts, read 221,402 times
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A hedge fund investor, who just invested in Dollar Tree, wants to raise some prices to over $1. See https://www.businessinsider.com/doll...or-says-2019-1

Would you continue to shop at Dollar Tree if they raise prices on some items to over $1?

My take on it is that this new investor does not know Dollar Tree customers. When you go into Dollar Tree, you expect to pay $1 or under. That's the draw of the store. Changing that concept makes Dollar Tree like any other store.

This investor also wants Dollar Tree to sell Family Dollar, a fairly recent acquisition. I can understand that since Family Dollar has been under performing. However, by making some Dollar Tree prices over $1, isn't that like making it more like lower performer Family Dollar?
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Old 01-07-2019, 06:39 PM
 
Location: Majestic Wyoming
609 posts, read 279,641 times
Reputation: 1667
I was not a frequent shopper at any dollar stores, until we moved to rural Wyoming. Gone was my Target, and Wal Mart, but what they do have, and it's the only store open on Sunday is Family Dollar.

So after some initial wariness I needed something and ended up in Family Dollar. I was surprised that most things were not a dollar, because my previous experiences in the 98 only stores did meet with the expectation that most things were in fact 98, but this was not the case in Family dollar.

Now I'm a frequent shopper at Family Dollar for lack of anywhere better to go in our area that's close to home, and open on Sundays. I typically buy medicines there, sometimes clothing, paper products like wrapping paper, envelopes, greeting cards. Sometimes I'll buy seasonal items and candy, also junk food for our camping trips.

It's not my number one favorite store, but it works in a pinch, and it's cheaper on some items than our normal grocery store.
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Old 01-07-2019, 06:46 PM
 
Location: The South
4,757 posts, read 3,311,524 times
Reputation: 7071
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cloudy Dayz View Post
I have never shopped at dollar stores, but lately they are sprouting up like weeds around me. Which is kind of bizarre, because businesses have been closing up and leaving this area for the last 30 years at least. We have lots of vacant storefronts. All the gas stations except one are closed. The local grocery stores are a complete joke. Except for the modern checkout stands, they look like they haven't been remodeled since the 1960s.

But in the middle of this economic disaster, Dollar General decided to tear down a bunch of vacant buildings and build a brand new store. Having heard people talk so much about dollar stores I decided to stop by this new Dollar General, to check it out for the first time. It was my first time ever in a dollar store. I had a coupon for $5 which I thought I could use for something, but I couldn't use it. The prices were are a complete joke. Nothing I could see was even close to $1. They should call it a $5 store, because that is about the cheapest items they have. I'm not sure how this store compares to other Dollar General stores, but if this is the best they have to offer, the chain is doomed. The only thing this Dollar General could compete with around here would be the local 7-Eleven store, and they are failing at that. As I drove into the store, I wasn't even sure it was open, because there were so few cars in the parking lot. The Dollar General had two employees and one customer, other than me. The 7-Eleven store next door had five or six customers in the store at that same time.

This got me thinking and wondering why these dollar stores are such a big deal. Do you shop at dollar stores and why? Are your dollar stores different than the one I described above? I'm curious to know.
From DG website. No mention of one $ items.


Corporate Profile

Dollar General Corporation has been delivering value to shoppers for over 75 years. Dollar General helps shoppers Save time. Save money. Every day! by offering products that are frequently used and replenished, such as food, snacks, health and beauty aids, cleaning supplies, basic apparel, housewares and seasonal items at everyday low prices in convenient neighborhood locations. Dollar General operated 15,227 stores in 44 states as of November 2, 2018. In addition to high-quality private brands, Dollar General sells products from America's most-trusted manufacturers such as Clorox, Energizer, Procter & Gamble, Hanes, Coca-Cola, Mars, Unilever, Nestle, Kimberly-Clark, Kellogg's, General Mills, and PepsiCo. Learn more about Dollar General at www.dollargeneral.com.
Must be doing something right.
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Old 01-07-2019, 10:01 PM
 
8,851 posts, read 10,782,642 times
Reputation: 13908
Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern man View Post
From DG website. No mention of one $ items.
It's all a marketing gimmick to con the ignorant into visiting their stores. Nowhere does it say that the use of "Dollar" in a company name means everything is just $1.00. Dollar Tree and The 99.9 Cents Store are what I belive to be the last remaining multi-location true dollar sales stores. Unfortunately, the gimmick works and continues to work as even a decade after the dollar store craze ended, people still go all goggly-eye over the word "dollar" and really think that is the price of everything. I hate to think what those people would be expecting if the Five-and-Dime were still around.
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Old 01-07-2019, 10:13 PM
 
Location: California
392 posts, read 121,501 times
Reputation: 312
You cannot go wrong buying a 1.00 2019 calendar from the Dollar Tree!
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Old 01-07-2019, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Upstate NY
32,224 posts, read 9,537,968 times
Reputation: 30536
I love Dollar Tree. I get gift bags, paper and picnic goods, containers for freezing soups, 10-pk Scrub Buddies scouring pads, permanent markers, notebooks, 20"x 20" carpet tiles for our cat and dog...I especially like the 16-oz pump soaps for the kitchen and bathrooms. Those things are at least a few bucks for just a few ounces elsewhere--gimmeabreak.

Everything's a dollar at the Dollar Tree. And it doesn't matter how long the lines are because there are no price checks!
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