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Old 12-26-2018, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
17,218 posts, read 21,184,423 times
Reputation: 32119

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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
If you live in an area with public transport, and it looks like you do, it might work. Especially if it's rail. Also, get a bike and be able to ride it. Groceries often fit in a backpack. Your experience exposes the fact that driving isn't as cheap as most drivers think.
I wish I could ride a bike. I'm just not steady on a bike anymore, though. Tried to go bike riding with a friend a while ago, and it was a bad idea ha ha. They also get stolen left and right around here, and there are too many really bad drivers. Bicyclists get hit around here fairly often.

When I got rid of my car back in my 40's, I lived in Davis and it's such a bike-friendly town. I got a bike with a bunch of baskets on it and bungie cords and I used that thing like a pack animal.

 
Old 12-26-2018, 10:24 PM
 
Location: Reno, NV
502 posts, read 160,962 times
Reputation: 1715
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
You were referring to the sod from Lowe's. Well, I'm just not the kind of person to ask people to do things like this for me. I do have friends who are a young couple with a car who would help me in a pinch, but I'd rather not wear out my welcome with this kind of request, so if I ever need a big favor, I don't want to have already worn them out with running errands for me.

I could take a rolling cart and take two buses, but I think with my bad neck, there are some times when I just really need to consider the physical cost to doing certain things, and just cough up some money to avoid hurting myself.

I could haul the sod into the back of my pickup, and haul it up to my apartment in a cart, and then haul it out onto the balcony where I cut it in half and rolled up half into a bag to use later -- but even that was taxing for me, physically. Add the bus transfers, etc., and forget it.

Anyway, hauling the sod is really not great for my bad neck anyway. I think this is one expense I should have allowed myself a while ago. I tend to want to push my limits and then I pay for it.

Since your dog is now used to going on the balcony, try replacing the sod with cat litter. A small box of cat litter at the store is going to be much easier for you to carry on the bus. Gradually add cat litter to the existing sod so your dog gets used to it, to the point where there's no sod left and just cat litter. As a bonus, it's easy to clean up... and you don't have to be a cat to use it


Take the bus to the grocery store and use a hand basket in a shopping cart. When the hand basket is full, you're done shopping. This way you can take the bus back home. It makes no financial sense to pay $6-$10 for a taxi (or that awful Uber ) to take $10-$15 worth of groceries home when you have unlimited bus rides and lots of time.


Sometimes airport car rentals cost more than local and sometimes they cost less. It takes very little time to find out (obviously you have internet). There is no reason to refuse to rent a car from an airport. They're all the same, so pick the one that's the cheapest, and if they're the same, then pick the one that's most convenient.


These suggestions I have for you are things I have personally done myself, so I know they work. You are making a very good decision to sell a truck that you do not need and you cannot afford.


The first time I lived without a car was in Dallas, where the bus to my job only ran Monday-Friday. Twice a week (weekends) I walked five miles to work each way. The second time was in Austin, TX, where I got tired of spending half my income on car repairs. You live in an area that isn't blazing hot half the year.
 
Old 12-26-2018, 10:27 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
17,218 posts, read 21,184,423 times
Reputation: 32119
Quote:
Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
I got in a small accident several years back. I can walk to work and for basic errands. Long story short, it took me 2.5 months to get the car fixed (partly because of procrastination on my part). It wasn't too bad at first, but over time, it started to drive me nuts. It was too hard to visit friends or go to the laundromat.

I'll add that I didn't have a smart phone at the time, so I hadn't tried Uber. Nor had I tried ZipCar. So I probably could've made it better for myself if I'd been a bit more motivated.

But if I had to choose between a car and savings, I'd go with savings. The stress of no savings isn't worth it.
Oh God, it would be really rough to have to deal with the laundromat without a vehicle. My building has laundry facilities in the building. But, I hate even spending money on the machines. I bought a little portable washer that lives in my bathroom hidden in a big painted box that looks like a hamper ha ha. My stealth washer. And I just hang my stuff up to dry. I also just hand wash a lot of stuff that just needs to be refreshed and isn't stained. Just soak them in Woolite, rinse, hang them up.

But, I used a pick up/drop off laundry service at one point after my accident, and it was worth the money.
 
Old 12-26-2018, 10:47 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
17,218 posts, read 21,184,423 times
Reputation: 32119
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
Don't you have to fail smog to get money from the state for your car? If it were me I'd keep the car, but it sounds like not being able to have money in savings is causing you stress so go with your gut.
I read the rules again so I could answer your question and learned more.

This is one program:

https://bar.ca.gov/pdf/VR_Requirements.pdf

There are two options. One is for people who don't fit under their low-income requirements. Those people can only retire their vehicle, apparently, if they fail the smog.

If you qualify as low income, you can use the second option. You still have to have the vehicle tested for some reason, but you can retire it whether it passes or fails.

If it fails, low income folk can apply for the $500 grant money from the state to repair it so it will pass smog, or choose to just retire it.


There is another program offered by the air quality board, where even if you aren't low income, you can get paid to retire your vehicle, if you qualify. And it looks like your vehicle can pass smog to qualify. Here's the list of different areas in the state that offer programs:

https://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/avrp/avrpeo.htm

The one for the SF Bay Area is here:

Residents

Under this program, though, your vehicle has to have been registered in the participating area for at least 24 months.
 
Old 12-26-2018, 10:56 PM
 
Location: la la land
28,192 posts, read 11,932,527 times
Reputation: 19910
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I read the rules again so I could answer your question and learned more.
This is one program:
https://bar.ca.gov/pdf/VR_Requirements.pdf
There are two options. One is for people who don't fit under their low-income requirements. Those people can only retire their vehicle, apparently, if they fail the smog.
If you qualify as low income, you can use the second option. You still have to have the vehicle tested for some reason, but you can retire it whether it passes or fails.
If it fails, low income folk can apply for the $500 grant money from the state to repair it so it will pass smog, or choose to just retire it.
There is another program offered by the air quality board, where even if you aren't low income, you can get paid to retire your vehicle, if you qualify. And it looks like your vehicle can pass smog to qualify. Here's the list of different areas in the state that offer programs:
https://www.arb.ca.gov/msprog/avrp/avrpeo.htm
The one for the SF Bay Area is here:
Residents
Under this program, though, your vehicle has to have been registered in the participating area for at least 24 months.
Thanks, I forgot about the AQB program.
 
Old 12-26-2018, 11:07 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
17,218 posts, read 21,184,423 times
Reputation: 32119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alonso Gil View Post
Since your dog is now used to going on the balcony, try replacing the sod with cat litter. A small box of cat litter at the store is going to be much easier for you to carry on the bus. Gradually add cat litter to the existing sod so your dog gets used to it, to the point where there's no sod left and just cat litter. As a bonus, it's easy to clean up... and you don't have to be a cat to use it


Take the bus to the grocery store and use a hand basket in a shopping cart. When the hand basket is full, you're done shopping. This way you can take the bus back home. It makes no financial sense to pay $6-$10 for a taxi (or that awful Uber ) to take $10-$15 worth of groceries home when you have unlimited bus rides and lots of time.


Sometimes airport car rentals cost more than local and sometimes they cost less. It takes very little time to find out (obviously you have internet). There is no reason to refuse to rent a car from an airport. They're all the same, so pick the one that's the cheapest, and if they're the same, then pick the one that's most convenient.


These suggestions I have for you are things I have personally done myself, so I know they work. You are making a very good decision to sell a truck that you do not need and you cannot afford.


The first time I lived without a car was in Dallas, where the bus to my job only ran Monday-Friday. Twice a week (weekends) I walked five miles to work each way. The second time was in Austin, TX, where I got tired of spending half my income on car repairs. You live in an area that isn't blazing hot half the year.
This is brilliant! Thank you.

I think it will be really good for me to have to limit how much I buy. I'm kind of a grocery hoarder. When I see something I know I'll use up over time that's on sale, I will buy a ton of it. I do eventually use it up, but my storage space is limited in this apartment, so I'm always bursting at the seams. I can go to a store to pick up one thing, see something on sale, and end up hauling bags of groceries home that I hadn't intended to buy. When you work out my grocery cost over the year, yes this saved me money. But, it also means I have less storage space for other things. So, freeing up some storage space will also be a bonus.

And I will try the kitty litter option. Thanks.
 
Old 12-26-2018, 11:14 PM
 
2,626 posts, read 3,142,460 times
Reputation: 3875
Quote:
Originally Posted by WellShoneMoon View Post
Boy, I wish I could go car-free. One of my kids has lived in Chicago for 25 years and has never owned a car. He uses buses, the El, Uber. I envy him that freedom. I have never liked driving.

Where I live the public transportation is sketchy, not really an option. I live in an urban area and can walk to my grocery store, drug store, hair salon. Library and doctors/dentist are too far away for that.

My eyesight is diminishing, and I'm sure in a few years I'll have to give up driving. I guess I'd better start getting used to Uber.
Like you, I also wish I could live "car-free" - something I've dreamed of but is practically impossible in "car-crazy" Southern California, the Land of 1000 Daily Traffic Jams.

To borrow John Lennon's score:
Imagine no insurance, or car maintenance too. No need for registration. Or replacing worn out tires, wiper blades, or getting break pads anew. Imagine no need to gas up . . . every 5 to 10 days tooooo . . . yahaa whoo-oo! You may say I'm a dreamer. But I'm not the only one. I hope someday you'll join us. And the world . . .

I've lived in SoCal most of my life. However, as a former NYC resident, I recall the very efficient public transportation system in the 70's. Back then, you could transfer your way from train to bus, from borough to borough for no more than 50 to 60 cents. There may have been an added cost for a bus transfer ticket but I can't remember.

Wished like crazy I did not need a car to get around!

 
Old 12-26-2018, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
17,218 posts, read 21,184,423 times
Reputation: 32119
Quote:
Originally Posted by chacho_keva View Post
Like you, I also wish I could live "car-free" - something I've dreamed of but is practically impossible in "car-crazy" Southern California, the Land of 1000 Daily Traffic Jams.

To borrow John Lennon's score:
Imagine no insurance, or car maintenance too. No need for registration. Or replacing worn out tires, wiper blades, or getting break pads anew. Imagine no need to gas up . . . every 5 to 10 days tooooo . . . yahaa whoo-oo! You may say I'm a dreamer. But I'm not the only one. I hope someday you'll join us. And the world . . .


This is sooo good! Cracked me up!
 
Old 12-26-2018, 11:31 PM
 
258 posts, read 108,886 times
Reputation: 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by WellShoneMoon View Post
Boy, I wish I could go car-free. One of my kids has lived in Chicago for 25 years and has never owned a car. He uses buses, the El, Uber. I envy him that freedom. I have never liked driving.
I have never owned a car (never cared for the expensive, messy, stressful concept of owning a car), and I recently moved to Chicago. I was lucky enough to get a good job that is 7 minutes away from where I live (walking). I literally have everything I need within walking distance from my place (my job, my bank, my gym, several supermarkets, a post office, a pharmacy, Lake Michigan and the wonderful lakefront biking/running/walking trail, etc.
etc. I even live minutes away from bars, clubs, and a great nightlife (although that is not my thing, so I don't really take advantage of that). I wish everyone could experience the awesomeness of not even having to take public transport to go to work. It's just the best.
And it's priceless not having to worry about car insurance, car notes, car maintenance, gas, repairs, finding parking spots, traffic jams, road rage, not to mention the stressful fear of carjackings, car being towed, car being stolen, broken in, vandalized, etc.
 
Old 12-27-2018, 12:36 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
6,296 posts, read 3,392,302 times
Reputation: 12921
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oramasfella View Post
And it's priceless not having to worry about car insurance, car notes, car maintenance, gas, repairs, finding parking spots, traffic jams, road rage, not to mention the stressful fear of carjackings, car being towed, car being stolen, broken in, vandalized, etc.

If I had anxiety issues like that I probably would avoid owning a car too.
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