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Old 02-03-2009, 01:13 PM
 
Location: La lune et les étoiles
17,414 posts, read 18,305,671 times
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I loved this book as well as its counterpart "The Millionaire Woman Next Door" - very insightful for us ladies trying to make it to the top of the heap.

For women, its a great reinforcment that you will NOT become wealthy working for someone else or by running a knick-knacks shop.
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Old 02-03-2009, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Texas
42,288 posts, read 49,879,075 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OneDayAttaTime View Post

Never be ashamed of being frugal. If someone teases you for driving an older car they are the ones who most likely will dig themselves deeper in debt to drive a new one. It is the wealthy ones who will understand why you do the things you do. You can laugh all the way to the bank!
You know what's funny about that comment? It's how many people give me crap about how I don't spend money. I mean, what's it to them, anyway?

If one more person says, "Oh, you can afford it," I am going to punch them in the mouth. I can afford to set fire to a hundred dollar bill, but I'm not stupid enough to do it.
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Old 02-03-2009, 03:56 PM
 
25,880 posts, read 49,817,806 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
You know what's funny about that comment? It's how many people give me crap about how I don't spend money. I mean, what's it to them, anyway?

If one more person says, "Oh, you can afford it," I am going to punch them in the mouth. I can afford to set fire to a hundred dollar bill, but I'm not stupid enough to do it.
It was unbelievable all the comments I got because I still was driving the same car I bought in college for $800... They said I should be able to afford to drive any car I wanted

The CEO of the Hospital even called me into her office to ask if I was having financial problems She said staff and Doctors were "Concerned" about me because of my car... mind you... I'm talking about a car in excellent condition and a car where at least someone would ask me if it was for sale every week... my green 1972 4 door Plymouth Valiant. And yes... I still own the car...
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Old 02-03-2009, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Right where I want to be.
4,507 posts, read 7,834,439 times
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We get that a lot too. Apparently people think we could be living much better (although we're living more than fine now)...LOL I swear, I can't go shopping just for fun with even one person I know. I can try something on and like it and NOT buy it (because I don't really need or want it) but apparently this practice is unacceptable when shopping in the mall, one is expected to buy something. And of course 2 things are better than 1, and 3 is somehow better than 2. *shrug*

You wouldn't have believed the pressure we got from family members when they all succumbed to New Car Fever (within a few weeks of each other). They kept 'inviting' us to the car dealership. How could we keep our 5 year old car...we'd be the only ones without a NEW car and of course it doesn't make sense because we can 'afford the payments'.
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Old 02-04-2009, 08:06 AM
 
Location: lumberton, texas
652 posts, read 2,413,902 times
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I am always getting the same thing from people. At least a few of them now are starting to understand. Although, when it comes to our house I dont think one person I know didnt make a comment about why we should have gotten a bigger and better house. We just moved about 1 1/2 yrs ago and they are still making comments! We live in a nice middle class neighborhood with exactly what we need and a little bit of what we want (pool & walk in closets) no more, no less. and of course the new comments are about how we should buy a new car because they are so cheap and go out and do all of this shopping for things we dont need because they are so cheap and "we can afford it".

I wonder. Is there a book that is similar to the Millionair next door and the millionare mind? I loved both of those books and I havent read them in yrs. It would be nice to read something similar.
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Old 02-04-2009, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Right where I want to be.
4,507 posts, read 7,834,439 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by emailvasally View Post
I wonder. Is there a book that is similar to the Millionaire next door and the millionaire mind? I loved both of those books and I haven't read them in yrs. It would be nice to read something similar.
I haven't read this yet (because it's not at the library...I'm looking for it at the used book store...LOL) but this might be up your alley.

Amazon.com: The Frugal Millionaires - 70 millionaires anonymously share their ideas about money to help each other and you. (Retail: $21.95): Jeff Lehman: Books
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Old 02-05-2009, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Kansas
3,855 posts, read 11,476,315 times
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"Don't try to keep up with the Joneses because their broke." -Dave Ramsey
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Old 03-30-2009, 11:44 AM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,535 posts, read 29,284,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OneDayAttaTime View Post
Sweet Mother of God. Could the print possibly be any smaller?

I resent the fact that this article imples that if you are not religious that you somehow cannot be a caring, generous person. What a crock.

20yrsinBranson

Last edited by 20yrsinBranson; 03-30-2009 at 11:46 AM.. Reason: add to comment
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Old 03-30-2009, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Right where I want to be.
4,507 posts, read 7,834,439 times
Reputation: 3304
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
Sweet Mother of God. Could the print possibly be any smaller?

I resent the fact that this article imples that if you are not religious that you somehow cannot be a caring, generous person. What a crock.

20yrsinBranson
The print looked fine to me...you can always increase it on your screen.

Are we reading the same article? I didn't see any such implication here. It only stated that many of these folks gave to religious charities or were motivated by their Christian beliefs. I think you are reading the rest into it.
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Old 03-30-2009, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,749 posts, read 47,567,589 times
Reputation: 17623
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
Sweet Mother of God. Could the print possibly be any smaller?
It could be if you want.



Quote:
... I resent the fact that this article imples that if you are not religious that you somehow cannot be a caring, generous person. What a crock.

20yrsinBranson
IMHO, I think what it is linked more to is tithing.

If a person does not have a 'need' to budget, then their cost-of-living will match their income. They could get a pay raise every year, but still be broke come pay-day. I have seen this many times, in the military. A sailor gets a 10% pay raise [some from seniority and some from the annual COL raises] and his money goes no farther than it did before the pay raise.

Your standard-of-living will match what you have in your pocket, unless you engage your brain [and I am not saying the religious folk are smarter].

If you go to church, synagogue, temple once every blue moon, you drop a $20 in the offering plate, no big deal.

But if you go every week, and become a member of that congregation; then every week you hear doctrines about tithing. As a member of the congregation you will be given an annual pledge form. a worksheet if you will. Where you are encouraged to write-down your last year's annual gross income, then write-down 10% of that amount, 15% and 20%. Then you are told to pray about it, and selection which level of pledge you wish to make.

10% of your income is generally far more money than $20 in the plate once a month.

But now once a congregation member takes the time, and makes the commitment to give a tithe to his church, synagogue, or temple. And at this point they are already into the process of forming a household budget.

You can give a percent of your Gross Income to God, and a percent to the government, and a percent to investments, and still have $5 in your pocket come next payday.

IMHO, that is what your seeing.

It is not that religious folk are any better, than non. But that by being a member of a denomination, they are really being influenced to begin budgeting.

Really budgeting is what TMND is all about.

You can build a Net Worth of $1million, over a 20 year career, with an annual Gross Income of $50k/year, while supporting a family. But it takes budgeting and planning.

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