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Old 04-26-2009, 09:31 PM
 
4,218 posts, read 7,851,109 times
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We don't know how long spices have been stored in the store's supply chain. And, there are cheaper larger bags and more expensive smaller quantities of brand names. Personally, I buy larger cheaper bags.

And yes, I grow herbs... If you cringe when you hear "oregano" then you know... the prolific little soldier.
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Old 04-27-2009, 12:38 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nuala View Post
1. To aim for a high-paid career, one needs to go into debt (student loan debt). The higher the aim, the larger the debt.

2. Show me a highly paid person who braids rugs and lives in a 800 sq.ft. house. They need to have adequate toys and cars and houses, to keep up appearances. People in the $200,000 bracket do find it hard to save $50,000.

3. Difference in happiness (read, health). To make it over the rainbow to the "rich retirement" you would have to go through stressful jobs, kissing bosses' rear ends, losing out on time with your family, - just to finally arrive to a lake with your fishing rod. Well, the $30,000 - earner will have been fishing there for 30 years already.
You assume too much.

1. Not always true. You don't "need" to go into debt to have a career that earns a high income. My husband is one example of this. Britney Spears - and half of Hollyweird - is another! Maybe Hollywood is a bad example... but my husband isn't. We also know several people who have gotten themselves into a ridiculous amount of debt due to school loans, and now earn a ridiculously low salary comparatively. It's truly sad.

2. Here we are. We are high-income, and do not care about "keeping up appearances". We live in a small space and do not live according to other people's standards. There are more than a few of us out there. Don't assume that all people who earn a certain kind of income choose to live like all others who earn the same or similar income. Different people = different priorities. Most affluent/rich/wealthy people I know actually live very simply and consider themselves "cheap", because they don't like parting with their hard-earned money. You wouldn't know they had money simply by looking at them. And we also know people who look "rich", and act "rich", but are swimming in debt and have absolutely no financial safety net for themselves whatsoever. I'm willing to bet a lot of those people you see in those big houses with those fancy cars and that certain "rich" image... are actually not as well-off as they'd like everyone to think that they are.

3. This is also not always true. We are high earners and still make plenty of time for family time, we refuse to kiss anyone's butts... but I will agree about the stress part. Any job worth doing can be stressful at times. Even spending time with family can be stressful at times. I'll also agree with the health bit. And as for the staying healthy bit - the more money you make the better quality of life you can live (better food, better health care, better doctors, better education, more time and resources as far as exercise and so on) so really, a person who earns a higher income has an advantage here. A person on a lower income might have a harder time affording decent health care, insurance premiums, exercise classes, organic/wholesome foods, space and time and materials to grow their own foods, etc. There are certainly ways lower-income people can work around these problems (We did when we were lower-income, so we know...) but it takes a certain "know-how"... unfortunately not all low-income people seem inclined to seek out the information or resources for themselves and often end up in very tricky situations. The higher-income earner can afford the nice family get-away's and regular visits to the massage therapist, too!
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Old 04-27-2009, 07:40 AM
 
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Obviously, I over-simplified, but on average I still think it works this way. Smart people exist in any category, high- or low income.
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Old 04-27-2009, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Mequon, WI
7,676 posts, read 18,905,816 times
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Get rid of cable

get a low budget phone: virgin mobile, cricket,

keep heat at 60 around the clock

find the lowest cost dsl internet provider

when accelerating in your car keep it below 2500rpm

drive at 65 with cruise control

don't eat out

...........but then what fun is life.
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Old 04-27-2009, 01:31 PM
CBB
 
Location: Munich + FL, 32082
481 posts, read 1,999,122 times
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I don't know if this has been mentioned before because I haven't read through the thread, but we have the water heater on for only one hour in the morning. It kicks in at 5:30, I get up at 6:00 and shower, it reheats once and then shuts off. When DH showers at about 7:30, the water is still hot. I come home at ca 2:00 p.m. and the water is still very warm. Saves us a lot of heating oil during the months when the central heat is off.
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Old 04-27-2009, 10:03 PM
 
1,330 posts, read 1,041,579 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nuala View Post
1. To aim for a high-paid career, one needs to go into debt (student loan debt). The higher the aim, the larger the debt.

2. Show me a highly paid person who braids rugs and lives in a 800 sq.ft. house. They need to have adequate toys and cars and houses, to keep up appearances. People in the $200,000 bracket do find it hard to save $50,000.

3. Difference in happiness (read, health). To make it over the rainbow to the "rich retirement" you would have to go through stressful jobs, kissing bosses' rear ends, losing out on time with your family, - just to finally arrive to a lake with your fishing rod. Well, the $30,000 - earner will have been fishing there for 30 years already.
Nothing you said is correct. I'm proof of that.

I started a business with very little overhead, I have no boss, work 40 hours a week, earn six figures, live in the same modest house we bought 15 years ago, and have driven the same vehicles for a decade. I actually have to turn down customers because I don't want to encroach upon the leisure time I do have. The big difference between us now and 15 years ago is we don't walk over dollars to get to pennies. And we eat out more often. That's it. Other than that, we save like we always have.

To suggest we would be in better shape for retirement, had I kept my $30,000 job, is ludicrous.
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Old 04-27-2009, 11:07 PM
 
1,121 posts, read 3,098,889 times
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Here are some ideas for grocery savings

Make a shopping list and stick to it.
Always keep a variety of spices, staples, and dried beans, rice and pasta and canned goods on hand that you buy in bulk or on sale.
When you buy meat plan to use 75% for your meal and save 25% as a condiment in a second dish. You will get two meals and really not notice the difference
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Old 04-28-2009, 06:53 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yukiko11 View Post
Here are some ideas for grocery savings

Make a shopping list and stick to it.
Always keep a variety of spices, staples, and dried beans, rice and pasta and canned goods on hand that you buy in bulk or on sale...
I've been doing dried beans lately... it does save you a bit! I used to buy canned beans for convenience, but lately have been buying dry beans in bulk and cooking them at home. A little cup or two of dry beans makes a huge pot of cooked ones! Wow! And they taste better, too. We do a lot of dishes that use beans (bean and rice enchiladas, burritos, bean and rice bowls with toppings like avocado, salsa, shredded cheese, pico de gallo, barracho bean soup, black bean soup, bean dips, nachos, etc...) so I'm really happy about this. I don't know why I was too lazy to cook my own dang beans before! I've always bought lentils to make lentil soup from scratch, but never other legumes or beans. It's much less expensive to buy organic dried beans in bulk than to buy the cans of organic beans. Good tip, yukiko11!!

I wish there was a way to save on dairy products... milk, butter, and yogurt seem so $$$ lately to me.
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Old 04-28-2009, 07:01 PM
 
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Somebody else might have already said this, but one thing I do to save on groceries is to have regular things that I cook each week. For example... on Sundays I almost always roast a big chicken. Then on Monday I use the bones and any leftover met to make chicken noodle soup, or chicken and rice soup. Lately, I've been cooking those big pots of beans (see above post ) and I'm finding that we can eat for three or four days on that big pot of beans - bean soup one night, bean burritos the next, beans and rice with toppings, enchiladas... also blitzing some in a food processor with a few other ingredients that I usually have on hand to make dips for the kids lunches and snacks and things.

I also like to slow-roast meat - like a pot roast or pork shoulder, whatever is good from our local butcher - and that usually lasts a few days as well. Shred the meat and use it for sandwiches, tacos, over rice, over salads, etc. Initially you might think that paying $20 for a good hunk of meat is too $$$, but when it'll last a family of four for several days - that's actually a pretty good deal. Of course there are less expensive things to eat, but we like good home-cooked food. Food is something I will not sacrifice quality or goodness for in order to save money. Food, shoes, and underwear! Other things I'm more willing to scrimp and sacrifice and save on, but not those things.
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Old 04-28-2009, 07:07 PM
 
5,945 posts, read 12,719,242 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Milwaukee City View Post
Get rid of cable
Amen! We went years and years without TV. Then we wanted to watch the hoopla surrounding the recent presidential elections (I mean, it was historic...) so we got the very basic cable. It's really cheap... but now we have it... and I hate that we have it. I know, hate is a strong word, but there's practically nothing good on TV. Once you go years and years without it, and then suddenly you have it, you really see it for what it is - brain candy.

The only channel I feel is worthwhile to watch is OPB. It's Oregon's PBS.
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