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Old 03-30-2009, 11:24 AM
Status: "happy again, no longer catless! t...." (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,423 posts, read 16,691,770 times
Reputation: 16430

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I take advantage of the shed in back by washing out and saving all the milk bottles and boxes. The cans I wash and use for melting wax for candles as I make my own scented candles. When it comes time to start plants I take the soda bottles and cut holes in the bottoms, and for each trim off the top and side of a milk carton leaving the handle and do not put a hole in it. I use the soda bottle to start the plants and sit them in the milk carton with the handle. And can carry them around. And should be plan to be gone a few days, put extra water in the carton so they won't dry out.

I also have a bin of clothes that don't fit, parts of fabric that was big enough any fabric that is salvagable. When I need to make something small I reuse it. Yes, it looks like a lot of "stuff" but at the cost of a pair of bootlaces I made leggings that look like knee high boots, by hand and entirely out of remnants of clothes and an old washable blanket. I made a sleep mask at the cost of zero out of the same stuff.

I live alone so I buy family packs and freeze one nights meal per bag of meat. I cook stews except for the potatoes, which tend to not freeze well, and save those. I made a double batch of meatloaf and cooked them in small loaf pans and froze them. When I want dinner I open up the freezer and take my pick.

I also cook creatively from scrach. I made potato soup the other day from a piece of pork that was cooked and saved, left over chicken broth a carrot and half an onion. And some potatoes which were too dry to bake. Wala, a wonderful meal. Leftovers get frozen or eaten.

I have some things I ask before buying something other than a necessity. Why do I want it? What will I do with it? Do I really need it? For the money is there something else I'd rather have. I reserve the right to unload the cart of the stuff I changed my mind on before I check out.

I try to do one big monthly shopping for food except vegies. Banannas can be frozen if you are using them in slushies. I like one percent milk so I'm looking into some milk powder that is said to taste fresh. It it pans out I can get far less whole milk at the store, mix it so on gallon makes four and have one less reason to go to the store. And it too can be frozen.

I'm looking up old recipies for stuff like pudding and the like so I can make it at will and don't have to buy little boxes. Not only does it save money to cook it yourself but you know whats in it too.

My goal is to have a six month backup of food. When that happens I will replace rather than buy for the month and save the money for other things.
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Old 03-30-2009, 12:30 PM
 
270 posts, read 974,400 times
Reputation: 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
The stiffening must be residue from somewhere
It's the laundry detergent. I used to use a capful of liquid when I had a top-load washer. Since I replaced it with front load, same amount of clothes only needs 1/4 cap-ful now. And my clean clothes does not have that strong perfume smell anymore. My clothes are clean and if I hang them out to dry, they do not get stiff as before.
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Old 03-30-2009, 12:42 PM
 
270 posts, read 974,400 times
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I love baking soda. It is used to scrub stubborn stain on pots and pans.I also dilute it in water to use as deodorant on upholstered furniture and carpet since I have pets at home. Sometimes I put a small amount into my laundry to get rid of smell. I sprinkle a thin layer in my cat litter box, mix well, to keep it odor-free.
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Old 03-30-2009, 01:25 PM
 
540 posts, read 1,174,888 times
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A big household savings for me is in the grocery department. I plan my shopping around the sales of the local stores.
One will have a sale on Angus beef at $1.99 a pound. A savings of $3.00 a pound. I'll ask the in-house butcher to grind up several pounds. At home, I cut some up as steaks and cubed some for stew.

Proper wrapping and freezing is important to keep the integrity of the beef. I wrap individual patties in wax or butcher paper then fill up freezer bags with the patties. Taking out one or several for a recipe is convenient and they thaw quickly

This saves me so much money and time.


For the steaks, my family likes teryaki flavor. I put individual steaks in freezer bags and stand them up with seal open. I then pour a few ounces of marinade in , squeeze out the air and freeze.

Fav marinade: Equal parts of oj and soy sauce. Garlic powder and ginger (fresh grated or dried)
to taste. 1 tsp or so of each. Dash of red pepper or chilli for a kick.

We like this marinade on chicken and salmon too. Soak salmon for no more than 45 minutes, but chicken and steak can be frozen in it or marinated overnight.
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Old 03-30-2009, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Up in a cedar tree.
1,618 posts, read 5,845,392 times
Reputation: 556
When your at McDonalds and super hungry, don't buy the BigMac value meal. Look on the one dollar menu and drink water and not soda.
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Old 03-30-2009, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
1,820 posts, read 3,899,868 times
Reputation: 1896
Quote:
Originally Posted by wheelsup View Post
I'm not into saving $.01 on a dryer sheet, when I have bigger fish to fry. Never was my style, and never really understood it. People will spend hours out of their day doing things like the OP said but when it comes to the 20% of things that they spend 80% of their money on (housing, utilities, car maintenance & insurance, etc) they overlook those or do nothing about them.
I agree. I have a friend who says that they do certain things so that they are saving money on them,but sometimes they seem so time consuming and ridiculous. Sometimes I feel as though some of the things they do really are not money savers at all.
An example would be;
making their own invitations for ANYTHING that is going on,a child's birthday,baptisms,they make their own Xmas cards,print out all their own photo's,etc...
I would think that by the time you pay for the stock paper to make the invitations and cards and the colored printer cartridges,etc.. ,you really aren't saving a whole lot more than if you were to just buy them! ?
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Old 03-30-2009, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Corinth, ME
2,712 posts, read 4,916,831 times
Reputation: 1863
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgal View Post
How do you get your clothes soft drying them on the line. When I did that they were always stiff.
That is the work of our old friend the WIND! When I hang out in a stiff breeze, the clothes get softened naturally.

When I hang out on a (very rare for me) still air day, they are crisp.

I LOVE crisp bath towels, but have a hard time finding a still air day!
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Old 03-30-2009, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Taylors, SC
348 posts, read 835,954 times
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We have a monthly budget for eating out, and for allowance for our 14 year old. We keep the set amount in cash in envelopes (locked in the safe, of course), and if our son asks for more money, we can say "hey, we already gave to $40 this month!" and that's the end of that. If we have leftover money from our "dining out fund" we put it into next month's envelope, and eventually we have enough extra for a nice dinner out.
I know this isn't any major revelation, but it has helped us to save quite a bit of money.
Also keeping a log of where our money goes has helped tremendously. I did it for a year and I had no idea how much money I was wasting until I saw it there in black and white!
Oh, we also use restaurant.com coupons too. There's almost always a coupon code to get a $25 "gift certificate" for $2.00-$3.00. Just make sure to read the fine print. Some places require you to spend $50 in food (alcoholic drinks not included) in order to use the $25 gift certificate.
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Old 03-30-2009, 06:24 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,730 posts, read 47,507,271 times
Reputation: 17577
Quote:
Originally Posted by aiwei View Post
It's the laundry detergent. I used to use a capful of liquid when I had a top-load washer. Since I replaced it with front load, same amount of clothes only needs 1/4 cap-ful now. And my clean clothes does not have that strong perfume smell anymore. My clothes are clean and if I hang them out to dry, they do not get stiff as before.
The Dw makes her own laundry soap. Sometimes it is a powder she makes, sometimes a liquid.

I know it is way cheaper, but I dont ask.

She is allergic to the perfumes in most commercial soaps.
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Old 03-30-2009, 07:56 PM
 
53 posts, read 291,078 times
Reputation: 70
A student for 8 year gives me some credibility on this topic.

1. Hang dry clothing
2. Buy clothing in off seasons at stores with sell unsold items
3. Don’t buy conditioner for hair
4. Shave with soapy water
5. Eat rice and beans, very little meat because it is expensive
6. Grow your own vegetables: tomatoes, squash, collar greens, etc.
7. recycle everything: paper, cans, all kinds of plastic
8. paper towels are a waste
9. buy food and items by price/weight
10. buy/recieve expired food – it is still good
11. buy car maintenance manual and do your own car repair, but be careful not to cause more harm then good
12. live close to work or school. I live across the street from my community college.
13. Cable, newspaper, soda, ice-cream, internet (other then netzero – no month fee if still offer), cell phone, eating out, air conditioning (live in San Bernardino Ca) are all unnecessary.

Now that things have improved a lot for me, I don’t have the time or patience to penny pinch. Just is not worth it to me. But it still do a lot of the above but with less desperation.
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