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Old 04-02-2009, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Taylors, SC
348 posts, read 835,658 times
Reputation: 175

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DE_NePA View Post
I can't see it. Once the cold air is inside your house, what good is a piece of cloth ung in front of the window? It may stop the draft, but it won;'t do anything to keep the temperature from dropping due to the cold air infiltration. You might as well just wear a sweater. That cuts the draft and conserves body heat. Thermal drapes are a complete waste.
We, of course, have windows in our bedrooms. One bedroom has leather-like drapes in front of the metal blinds. The other bedroom only has the metal blinds. It makes a HUGE difference in the room temperature in the colder months.
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Old 04-02-2009, 12:39 PM
 
276 posts, read 943,724 times
Reputation: 247
1. always buy clothes on sale. I never ever buy them at full price. i feel like i am giving them my money if i have to buy it at full price!!
2. fill the gas in your car on tuesdays/wednesdays. check for few weeks at your gas station to see when they have the lowest during the week. i have found that usually gas stations increase their rates on thursday/friday.
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Old 04-02-2009, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Pembroke, GA
87 posts, read 275,184 times
Reputation: 44
Turn off the lights if you aren't going to be in the room. Turn off the hot water heater after everyone has had their shower and the dishes are washed. Air dry the dishes instead of using the dry cycle on the dishwasher. Unplug the appliances when they aren't in use because they still draw small amounts of power. Only buy what you need. Grow your own vegetables. Raise a few chickens for meat and eggs.

Quote:
Originally posted by golfgal
How do you get your clothes soft drying them on the line. When I did that they were always stiff. I LOVE my sheets dried on the clothes line-the smell--but the kids have bad allergies and I can't really do that any more if I want them to be able to breath.
To keep clothes from getting stiff when hanging outside, use the fabric softener that you put in the clothes washer. Shake the pollen off the clothes, and try running them through the dryer for about 10 minutes. I have hay fever and the pollen count has been high, but I still hang my clothes outside.
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Old 04-02-2009, 04:26 PM
 
410 posts, read 934,668 times
Reputation: 648
I've quit buying:

Paper towels
Garbage bags (Even if you take your canvas totes to the market, it still seems as if you end up w/ a bunch of plastic shopping bags, so I just use those or empty boxes)
Hair conditioner (you don't really need this)
Shaving cream (soap and water works fine)
Toothpaste (baking soda works well, unless I have a coupon that makes it almost free)
Most cleaning products (I'm down to using baking soda, bleach, pine-sol, and a little comet now and then)
Bleach is also good for unclogging drains and much cheaper than any other option.
My sis has a daycare and she uses only bleach in the dishwasher, the Health Dept. people suggested this. But I don't have a dishwasher.
Wash in cold water.
Cable TV (many shows are now available on the Internet)
My Landline phone was gone long ago.
Kleenex (toilet paper is the same thing, and I buy Scott which is great bargain because it goes a long way and you can often find coupons for it)

I fill my shampoo bottles with water and shake when I can't get anything else out and end up w/ 2-4 more uses.
Don't go to Wal-Mart (just about anything you need can be found like new at garage sales, thrift stores, estate sales, or occassionally stores like Kohl's or Big Lots if you really need something new for the house).
Learn to haggle at garage sales and flea markets. Not obnoxiously, but I've learned that 95% of the time, if you see something that has, for example $10 on it, ask the owner, "Will you take $8?" and usually they will come down. Or you can ask if they will take so much if you buy this item and that item.
Birthday cards and greeting cards I buy at dollar stores (2 for a buck)
Stock up on Christmas cards and other seasonal stuff after the holiday is over (often saving 75% or more)
Same with gifts (I keep a gift closet. When I find something totally dirt cheap that I know will make a good gift, I buy it and put it in the closet)
Recycle envelopes, gift bags, etc.
Turn it off and unplug it if not in use.
Keep the thermostat off, as much as possible. (I've gotten used to wearing sweats, socks, and woolly slippers around the house and it is fine, in the summer I'll wear shorts and go barefoot).
I buy mainly what is on sale (check the mark down bins at the grocery--I found Nestle chocolate bars the other day that were slightly out of date, and the label was in Spanish, for 20 cents each. It's fine, I'm having one now. Also canned goods for 25 cents.)
Lots of stuff is thrown away at work--I bring home boxes, envelopes, whatever I can reuse.
I have a Pur water filter and I use it to fill my water bottles that I carry with me.
Use what is in your pantry before buying more.
Use the leftover condiments and utinsels from fastfood for lunches you take to work.
Use the farmer's markets.
Coupons for anything you can--from groceries to fast food to whatever.
Check the mark-downs in the bakery at the grocery store--lots of good deals here for cents.
Buy meat on sale and freeze.
Move closer to work (I moved 4 minutes away and it is saving me over $100 a month in gasoline).
I'm a booklover and I find just about everything I want or need either at garage/estate sales, library book sales, thrift stores, or free online book swaps. I doubt if I go to Barnes and Noble or other box stores more than once a year.

Estate Sales--I can't say enough about these little gems. Often if you go on Sunday or the last day of the sale, things are marked 50% to 75% off. The other day I got a large art deco chest of drawers for $25, in great shape (and they delivered). I also got a small mission-style bookcase, a stack of brand new hand towels, and two figurines I knew I could resale all for $5! Some people think estate sales are morbid or weird but I think they are full of bargains. Often on the last day, the people who run the sale will practically give the stuff away so they won't have to deal with it. People often put stuff up and never open it. I find lots of new towels and linens and all kinds of things still in the boxes for literally pennies. Not too long ago I found a brand new VCR still in the box for $15. Now I buy videos at garage sales and watch movies I've missed over the years. Usually I give 25 cents to $1 for the movies and I resale them for $1 each. And I don't go to the movies.

RESALE-since I know books, I keep my eyes open and resell some books and other items on ebay. It is so simple to do, just by reselling junk I pick up here and there, never hardly paying more than $1, I can easily make $300-$400 a month. If I spent more time on it, I could probably make more, as I know some people do make a living doing this.

Garage Sales--I also keep a garage sale/donation box for other stuff. Sometimes my relatives or friends have garage sales and I may make a few extra bucks by putting stuff in. I've had my own in the past and made several hundred. But now I don't have as much stuff, I've sold it all, I guess! LOL! Sometimes I'll just take the box to Goodwill if it gets full or donate it however I can.

Keep an eagle eye--I don't go out scavaging garbage on big trash days, although I don't think there is anything wrong with it and people often make good money at it. Americans will throw anything away. But I do keep my eyes peeled--I used to live in a small apartment complex that was mostly college students. They were notorious for leaving things behind. Just by taking my garbage out, I found at different times: A big garbage bag full of Levi 501's (over 20 pair, in great shape), which I would have sold online but ended up giving to someone who needed them; a large box of CD's, which I sold; a vacuum cleaner that I used for over a year; several settings of Fiesta dinnerware which I sold; a big box of canned food, some of which I used and some of which I donated; I could go on.

A person can live very frugally if the effort is put out.
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Old 04-02-2009, 07:03 PM
 
Location: roaming gnome
12,391 posts, read 23,766,008 times
Reputation: 5608
how does one get into the book reselling part time job stuff??? I am a pretty big book enthusiast... but guess I don't know what is worth what... is there a good place to learn this kind of stuff??? My retirement dream is to own a little bookshop.
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Old 04-02-2009, 07:05 PM
 
Location: southern california
55,237 posts, read 72,402,860 times
Reputation: 47449
listen to dave ramsey like your life depended on it.
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Old 04-02-2009, 09:28 PM
 
540 posts, read 1,174,557 times
Reputation: 867
soonerguy,excellent post. I do many of the same things, except yard/estate sales

However you have piqued my interest.
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Old 04-02-2009, 10:07 PM
 
410 posts, read 934,668 times
Reputation: 648
Quote:
Originally Posted by baseballgal View Post
soonerguy,excellent post. I do many of the same things, except yard/estate sales

However you have piqued my interest.
I think you would really be shocked at what you might find at estate sales. They are easy to get addicted to. However, it depends also on where you live. I live in a large city and there may be four or five on a good weekend. Sometimes none. You have to be careful because some people will advertise "estate sale" when it is really nothing other than a good clean-out sale or moving sale. If you live in a smaller city or town, they may be few and far between, but when you do come along one, they are often good ones. I love country estate sales. I scan the newspaper on Thursdays and/or Fridays, usually go to the ones I want on Saturday, buy what I think is a good bargain (sometimes things are overpriced the first day and I don't buy anything), and if I see things I really want but they are too much, I might go back Sunday an hour or two before closing. Then you get the best deals. You can even leave bids on things like big, nice, antique furniture. If it doesn't sell in the sale, they take the highest bid and you can get really good furniture this way very cheaply. The best thing about estate sales (real ones) is that it is not alot of junk like garage sales often are--it is the lifetime accumulation of a person. I once lived in a college town and the estate sales of the old professors were the best.

Garage sales are another bag. I've gotten kind of picky about them. I'll drive by and if I see mostly clothing I won't stop. You really never know what you'll find--about half are not worth the stop but you can glance over the stuff and be back in your car within five minutes usually. The best garage sales are when whole neighborhoods have them or church/organizational rummage sales. These are usually dirt cheap.
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Old 04-02-2009, 10:53 PM
Status: "happy again, no longer catless! t...." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,421 posts, read 16,681,935 times
Reputation: 16425
Quote:
Originally Posted by PaisleyChic View Post
Turn off the lights if you aren't going to be in the room. Turn off the hot water heater after everyone has had their shower and the dishes are washed. Air dry the dishes instead of using the dry cycle on the dishwasher. Unplug the appliances when they aren't in use because they still draw small amounts of power. Only buy what you need. Grow your own vegetables. Raise a few chickens for meat and eggs.



To keep clothes from getting stiff when hanging outside, use the fabric softener that you put in the clothes washer. Shake the pollen off the clothes, and try running them through the dryer for about 10 minutes. I have hay fever and the pollen count has been high, but I still hang my clothes outside.
I was going to try drying outside once my fence goes up (not really into people driving down the nearby road checking out my underwear) but we have a lot of trees and a lot of pollen. If my clothes get covered in pollen it would be a lot better to just dry it. How long in the dryer removes pollen from clothes? Its almost always windy and will it coat the clothes with dust which would have to be pulled off in the dryer? This could make that a no-go for a line.

In the summer I put light weight clothes on one of those pull out clothes racks and put it in front of the box fan and dry it that way too. It goes in a warm dryer every third wash or so to shrink it back to the right size.

Good suggestions, but I modify some. I regularly walk between the three rooms in the house. If I turned the light on and off in the kitchen every time it would be multiple times an hour. So I have a low wattage bulb that is bright and leave it on. Thank the Lady there is a window which makes the room TOO bright during the day.

With food, right now I'm spending much more than needed on food. But its going in the stash. I have a goal of six months of food and when that is reached will keep track of what got used and replace. But should a problem with money arise I will know there is a stock of food.

I am putting in a garden this summer. It will be larger next year, but will start with a few things this time. That was the very first thing that I noticed about the yard when I first saw the house.
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Old 04-03-2009, 12:20 AM
Status: "happy again, no longer catless! t...." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,421 posts, read 16,681,935 times
Reputation: 16425
Quote:
Originally Posted by d_Random View Post
Prevention is the key is saving money. I try to save where I can just like everyone else here, but your entire savings can be wiped out with a prolonged health related problem. Health problems are one of the top reasons for home foreclosure.

This being said, here are my top 2 money saving tips:

1) Purchase a gym membership
2) Reduce your consumption of meat or better yet transition to become a vegetarian.

The American Institue of Cancer Research recommends being physically Active for at Least 30 Minutes Every Day. As well as helping us avoid weight gain, research shows that activity itself can help to prevent cancer. Studies show that regular activity can help to keep our hormone levels healthy, which is important because having high levels of some hormones can increase our cancer risk.

AICR also recommends to reduce your cancer risk, eat no more than 18 oz. (cooked weight) per week of red meats, like beef, pork and lamb and avoid processed meat altogether. Meat such as ham, bacon, salami, hot dogs and sausages.

Here is the link to the AICR for more information:
AICR: AICR Diet and Health Guidelines for Cancer Prevention
Physical activity is important and especially if you have no insurence. But you should take care what you do so you don't end up injured and need medical attention.

You don't need a gym membership. Look in the saturday paper and find someone with a cheap stationary bike for bad weather. If you have access to a pool, swim. But the best exercise that can be done by nearly everyone is simply to walk. Get good shoes (for walking) with support for the ankles and good grip. Find somewhere interesting to walk and make your daily walk part of your routine. Costs nothing and won't ruin you knees, can be done in almost all weather if your used to it and will introduce you to your neighbors.

Diet wise, seek balance. Don't go into depression if you couldn't resist those cookies once in a while. Or that sinfully greasy dinner. Vegetarian diets are good but not everyone can handle them (I tried, couldn't). But meat can be gotten cheap and used in small amounts. A stew is one of the cheapest thing you can make. Use broth to cook the meat and use lots of vegies.

I find that while its just me, my actual food cost is very low. My budget for now is higher since I'm building up a supply but when that is done it will drop considerably.

Right now food is cheaper. Its likely to get more expensive. If you have the money now is the good time to stock up.
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