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Old 04-11-2009, 12:07 PM
 
5,945 posts, read 12,719,242 times
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I used to work at a coffee shop and people would come in asking for our used coffee grounds... they said they would use them in their garden and their flowers loved them? I've never tried it... but these people would take huge garbage bags full of grounds home with them.
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Old 04-11-2009, 07:45 PM
 
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Don't clean cheap venetian blinds. Too much trouble, and you can't get them clean. Buy new ones for $3.97. I guess this is a time-saving tip rather than a money saving one. Although...time is money.
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Old 04-11-2009, 08:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wheelsup View Post
I'm not into saving $.01 on a dryer sheet, when I have bigger fish to fry. Never was my style, and never really understood it. People will spend hours out of their day doing things like the OP said but when it comes to the 20% of things that they spend 80% of their money on (housing, utilities, car maintenance & insurance, etc) they overlook those or do nothing about them.
You are so right. I've spent my adult life stepping over dollars to get to pennies. One paradox is this; you can rich far faster by earning than you can by saving. Any tiny saving measure that requires time isn't worth it.

One of things I've gotten sucked into is saving aluminum cans for money. This isn't worth it unless you can get hundreds or even thousands of cans without any effort. At our local recyling place, a hundred cans brings you about 95 cents. Gasoline to the recycle place and back costs over a dollar.
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Old 04-13-2009, 05:06 PM
 
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For you ladies that don't use hair conditioner because of the price. I have found to use a handful of baking soda mixed in with my shampoo and wash like normal and my hair comes out soooooo soft now. Try it.
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Old 04-13-2009, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,722 posts, read 47,483,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eeeee22895 View Post
... One paradox is this; you can rich far faster by earning than you can by saving. Any tiny saving measure that requires time isn't worth it. ...
I most strongly dis-agree.

You can not always increase your income, but you can control your cost-of-living.

In the book: "The Millionaire Nextdoor" they show hundreds of examples of this. Controlling your output, controls how much you have to invest with.

You simply can not control your income as easily.



It is possible to earn $65k/year, to support a family; and to be poor.

It is also possible to earn $65k/year, to support a family, and to accumulate a large Net Worth.

I worked in a career field filled with men who had families and who insisted that we were all poor and under-paid. Yet my Dw and I worked very hard to learn to control our taxes and our cost-of-living, and our Net Worth grew.

We amassed a large portfolio before my retirement.

I saw others who had exactly the same Gross income as I had. they were struggling and often needed assistance. While I was collecting apartment buildings, from the same level of income.

Learning to budget your self, and tax-planning are far more important than focusing on income.
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Old 04-13-2009, 11:09 PM
 
Location: The end of the road Alaska
860 posts, read 1,705,880 times
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I keep wondering if any of my frugal tips apply to anyone NOT living in a cabin in remote Alaska or some such off-the-path place but, why not. We have no fast-food joints or grocery stores selling mashed potatoes, one coffee shop that closes after lunch - so eating out just isn't on the menu and quite frankly, not missed one bit. There's much more fun stuff to do than pay someone to cook my dinner and bring it to me!
I think the first thing everyone needs to do is buy a canner and some jars. Other than evaporated milk, I don't buy anything from the grocery store in cans or jars. I take that back, I buy some oriental stuff like chestnuts and I buy olives.
When veggies are fresh, on sale and in season I buy as much as I can afford, blanch and freeze. Fruits and tomatoes I buy as much as I can afford and can in pint jars. When I make chili, stew, ham & beans, soups & chowders, I make enough to eat on for a couple days and enough to fill 8 quart jars for the canner. When I make spaghetti sauce, same thing. When I make lasagne, I make an extra pan just to cut into serving portions, wrap in plastic & freeze. When I bake a pie, I make 2 -one for the oven, one for the freezer. When I make cookie dough, I double it and freeze half. Today I was given enough old bananas for 6 loaves of banana nut bread. Half will be given away, the other half in the freezer. I'm never without a quickie meal in a hurry or a fast goodie to take to a friend, and it's all home-cooked if not home grown.
The trick is to have a well-stocked pantry. If I want something, whether it's candy or a casserole I make it. If I don't have the ingredients to make it, I don't get to have it. simple as that
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Old 04-13-2009, 11:39 PM
 
4,218 posts, read 7,851,109 times
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If I don't have the ingredients to make it, I don't get to have it. simple as that

That's the crux of the problem - people forgot how to do this, how to go without if they don't have it. (in food, and in everything else).
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Old 04-14-2009, 01:22 AM
 
Location: NJ
2,111 posts, read 7,123,453 times
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I like the one of not using paper towels much. They can be an expense especially if you use them needlessly. We save our old kitchen towels separately and stack them in a cabinet. When I cook I always take an "old" towel out to wipe my hands or clean something up. In addition, we use the newer towels to dry the dishes. I'm the shopper and hate buying paper towels.
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Old 04-14-2009, 05:20 AM
 
5,816 posts, read 9,775,569 times
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Noodles, bread, growing vegetables, raising chickens for eggs and meat, quilting (turning rags into blankets!)

...the shere boredom of these activities...is there no middle way between living in autarcy and being a consumer freak?
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Old 04-14-2009, 08:09 AM
 
Location: NJ
2,111 posts, read 7,123,453 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JJingle View Post
Purchase in bulk at Costco and split the cost with a friend.
This among others is a very good tip. I buy in bulk when I can, especially at Costco. Great prices and it keeps you from going to the stores more often. I go to Costco once a month, local supermarket twice a month and just stop for milk in between. We share our stock with a Son and he does the same.
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