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Old 03-30-2009, 06:54 AM
 
Location: Northern VA
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Saving: Seven Things That Aren't Worth Your Money



I have to say that I TOTALLY disagree about the extended warranty. When we bought our house in 2003 (god, I miss my house) in Texas, we got extended warranties w/ all our appliances. And it turned out to be a good thing - we had our freezer and dishwasher replaced through it, and it was nice to have our fridge and washer fixed w/o spending more money after the original warranties wore off.

Of course, some folks don't like them. I guess it's a YMMV kind of thing.
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Old 03-30-2009, 09:54 AM
Itz
 
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I would never buy an extended warranty from the manufacturer (although huge applianecs I would recommend - washers, fridge, etc.)... I have a home shield warranty that covers my appliances... my pipes, my heater, my water heater, etc. etc...

i break a pipe - im covered, my dsihwasher fries, i'm covered, my furnace doesn't work, im covered..

The extended warranties on gadgets though - not worth it. I bought a computer that a 1year warranty from the manufacturer and they wanted me to buy a 2 year protection plan.. which covered the same thing my warranty covered. lol.
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Old 03-30-2009, 10:39 AM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,527 posts, read 29,233,815 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NicoleJ View Post
Saving: Seven Things That Aren't Worth Your Money



I have to say that I TOTALLY disagree about the extended warranty. When we bought our house in 2003 (god, I miss my house) in Texas, we got extended warranties w/ all our appliances. And it turned out to be a good thing - we had our freezer and dishwasher replaced through it, and it was nice to have our fridge and washer fixed w/o spending more money after the original warranties wore off.

Of course, some folks don't like them. I guess it's a YMMV kind of thing.
And I TOTALLY disagree with #5:

5. Organic Produce: It may feel good, but the price usually isn't right. Consider community supported agriculture if you want the real thing, but otherwise, remember that we're in a recession and go for the cheap stuff.

It is pathologically stupid to skimp on the quality of food that you and your family eats. I may live a very frugal lifestyle, but I eat very, very , very well. Nothing contributes more directly to your health than the quality of food that you consume. Any one with a drop of intelligence would understand that, above all else, you buy the VERY BEST food you can afford to buy.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 03-30-2009, 07:52 PM
 
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I agree with the food thing - and remember "best food" doesn't mean "nicest packaging"... I shop for a lot of stuff in the ethnic food aisles in our grocery store.
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Old 03-30-2009, 09:17 PM
 
298 posts, read 624,164 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
And I TOTALLY disagree with #5:

5. Organic Produce: It may feel good, but the price usually isn't right. Consider community supported agriculture if you want the real thing, but otherwise, remember that we're in a recession and go for the cheap stuff.

It is pathologically stupid to skimp on the quality of food that you and your family eats. I may live a very frugal lifestyle, but I eat very, very , very well. Nothing contributes more directly to your health than the quality of food that you consume. Any one with a drop of intelligence would understand that, above all else, you buy the VERY BEST food you can afford to buy.

20yrsinBranson
I agree. This is more a personal judgement call than the other items, and I side on buying higher quality food when I have the money available.
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Old 03-30-2009, 09:19 PM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
6,811 posts, read 14,586,342 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
And I TOTALLY disagree with #5:

5. Organic Produce: It may feel good, but the price usually isn't right. Consider community supported agriculture if you want the real thing, but otherwise, remember that we're in a recession and go for the cheap stuff.

It is pathologically stupid to skimp on the quality of food that you and your family eats. I may live a very frugal lifestyle, but I eat very, very , very well. Nothing contributes more directly to your health than the quality of food that you consume. Any one with a drop of intelligence would understand that, above all else, you buy the VERY BEST food you can afford to buy.

20yrsinBranson
The full article in the WSJ mentions (rather obliquely) the "dirty dozen" list of produce items you SHOULD buy organically - their point is that there are fruits and vegies for which buying organically makes much less sense because they are generally very low in pesticide levels or the pesticides are concentrated on a part of the fruit/veg that you don't eat.

As far as the quality of organic vs non-organic produce in a large chain grocery store, the organic stuff is often not any better - it's still picked too early, it's a variant grown for color or shippability rather than taste, even if it is organic.

If, on the other hand, you live somewhere with a farmer's market or CSAs, generally you get much higher quality food, even if it isn't organic. I'll pay farmer's market prices (which often aren't actually higher - or are not that much higher) for things picked in season and grown for taste rather than looks.
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Old 03-30-2009, 09:49 PM
 
298 posts, read 624,164 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW-type-gal View Post
The full article in the WSJ mentions (rather obliquely) the "dirty dozen" list of produce items you SHOULD buy organically - their point is that there are fruits and vegies for which buying organically makes much less sense because they are generally very low in pesticide levels or the pesticides are concentrated on a part of the fruit/veg that you don't eat.

As far as the quality of organic vs non-organic produce in a large chain grocery store, the organic stuff is often not any better - it's still picked too early, it's a variant grown for color or shippability rather than taste, even if it is organic.

If, on the other hand, you live somewhere with a farmer's market or CSAs, generally you get much higher quality food, even if it isn't organic. I'll pay farmer's market prices (which often aren't actually higher - or are not that much higher) for things picked in season and grown for taste rather than looks.
The organic produce I've purchased has almost always been better tasting than the non-organic alternative.
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Old 03-31-2009, 06:02 AM
 
Location: Eastern time zone
4,469 posts, read 6,160,640 times
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We try to buy locally (and optimally, in season)-- easier in some places than others, I know-- and buy from the local fruit stand. Tomatoes are 79c a pound right now instead of three times that at the supermarket.
I've also been reevaluating how many boxes of pre-mixed food I really need on my shelves. While my son would probably mutiny if I gave up Betty Crocker box potatoes, do I really need to buy teeny little packages of flavored rice at something like eight times the cost of regular? (And if I flavor my own, chances are it won't involve polysyllabic anti-caking agents.)
Funny how eating frugally and eating healthier are often hand in hand...
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Old 03-31-2009, 06:18 AM
 
Location: Way up high
14,072 posts, read 20,140,553 times
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I bought a new house and purchased the extended warranty on all appliances for 5 years on my appliances. It cost me $631 but you never know what could happen. Also, I thought about it for resale should we decide to sell in 3 years.
I also purchased the 5 year extended warranty on my LG washer/dryer. After spending almost $3k on the pair, I wanted all the protection I could have.
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Old 03-31-2009, 06:27 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
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I buy frozen veggies when local stuff is not available. Frozen veggies are picked riper than transported "fresh" veggies. Taste better as a result.
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