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Old 04-09-2009, 05:51 AM
 
3,761 posts, read 3,067,364 times
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Nuala, I never knew 1/2 of this!

DezertGirl, I love this thread!!! You guys are great!
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Old 04-09-2009, 10:13 AM
 
4,218 posts, read 7,851,109 times
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I was researching some more on coffee substitutes and came across this dandelion coffee:

"The roasted dandelion root pieces and the beverage have some resemblance to coffee in appearance and taste."

I have this vision of people digging dandelions out of their lawns - but not because they are sick and tired of the pesky weed, - because they are anticipating a nice cuppa coffee!

Dandelion coffee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Some more coffee ingredients:

"Grain coffee and other substitutes can be made by roasting or decocting various organic substances.

Some ingredients used include: almond, acorn, asparagus, malted barley, beechnut, beetroot, carrot, chicory root, corn, cottonseed, dandelion root (see dandelion coffee), fig, boiled-down molasses, okra seed, pea, persimmon seed, potato peel[2], rye, sassafras pits, sweet potato, wheat bran.

The Native American tribes of what is now the Southeastern United States brewed a ceremonial drink containing caffeine, "asi", or the "black drink", from the roasted leaves and stems of the Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria). European colonists adopted this beverage as a coffee-substitute, which they called "cassina".[3]

Ground roasted chicory root has been sold commercially on a large scale since around 1970, and it has become a mainstream product, both alone and mixed with real coffee. It was widely used during the American Civil War on both sides, and has long enjoyed popularity especially in New Orleans, where Luzianne has long been a popular brand in this respect.

Postum was an instant type of coffee substitute made from wheat bran, wheat, molasses, and maltodextrin from corn. It reached its height of popularity in the United States during World War II when coffee was sharply rationed. It remained popular for many years but is no longer made [4][5]."

Taken from Coffee substitute - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 04-09-2009, 10:29 AM
 
Location: The end of the road Alaska
860 posts, read 1,705,880 times
Reputation: 1757
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryBeth2 View Post
Yum, I want some! You are so lucky to live there GrammasCabin!!!!
Oh, I know, MaryBeth! I wouldn't - couldn't live anywhere else. We don't have much "stuff" here but it's amazing how little you really need to be well and happy. Most of what you really need is here for the taking if you're willing to put a little time and work into it. When I go down south to Seattle to visit my kids I just go nuts with all the noise, people, stuff in the stores - makes me feel like a toaster that's been plugged into a 220 socket! Besides, it's so very beautiful here.

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Old 04-09-2009, 11:43 AM
 
3,761 posts, read 3,067,364 times
Reputation: 7653
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrammasCabin View Post
Oh, I know, MaryBeth! I wouldn't - couldn't live anywhere else. We don't have much "stuff" here but it's amazing how little you really need to be well and happy. Most of what you really need is here for the taking if you're willing to put a little time and work into it. When I go down south to Seattle to visit my kids I just go nuts with all the noise, people, stuff in the stores - makes me feel like a toaster that's been plugged into a 220 socket! Besides, it's so very beautiful here.

Ahhh that even looks like it could be heaven.
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Old 04-09-2009, 11:45 AM
 
3,761 posts, read 3,067,364 times
Reputation: 7653
Quote:
Originally Posted by nuala View Post
I was researching some more on coffee substitutes and came across this dandelion coffee:

"The roasted dandelion root pieces and the beverage have some resemblance to coffee in appearance and taste."

I have this vision of people digging dandelions out of their lawns - but not because they are sick and tired of the pesky weed, - because they are anticipating a nice cuppa coffee!

Dandelion coffee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Some more coffee ingredients:

"Grain coffee and other substitutes can be made by roasting or decocting various organic substances.

Some ingredients used include: almond, acorn, asparagus, malted barley, beechnut, beetroot, carrot, chicory root, corn, cottonseed, dandelion root (see dandelion coffee), fig, boiled-down molasses, okra seed, pea, persimmon seed, potato peel[2], rye, sassafras pits, sweet potato, wheat bran.

The Native American tribes of what is now the Southeastern United States brewed a ceremonial drink containing caffeine, "asi", or the "black drink", from the roasted leaves and stems of the Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria). European colonists adopted this beverage as a coffee-substitute, which they called "cassina".[3]

Ground roasted chicory root has been sold commercially on a large scale since around 1970, and it has become a mainstream product, both alone and mixed with real coffee. It was widely used during the American Civil War on both sides, and has long enjoyed popularity especially in New Orleans, where Luzianne has long been a popular brand in this respect.

Postum was an instant type of coffee substitute made from wheat bran, wheat, molasses, and maltodextrin from corn. It reached its height of popularity in the United States during World War II when coffee was sharply rationed. It remained popular for many years but is no longer made [4][5]."

Taken from Coffee substitute - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I need to get my hubby to read that. He loves coffee. I think it would surprise him. It did me!
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Old 04-09-2009, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Rivendell
1,387 posts, read 2,109,890 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueflames50 View Post
good rule of thumb...if mushrooms have bugs on them they are safe to eat.
This is a myth. There is no rule of thumb to identify non-poisonous mushrooms. The only way to tell if a mushroom is edible is by correct identification.

I collect wild mushrooms, various wild greens, and blackberries.
Mushrooms are my favorite!
Sorry, I don't have any links.
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Old 04-09-2009, 04:07 PM
 
164 posts, read 464,026 times
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Interesting thread. The only wild collected food I've ever eaten were oxalis stems as a kid...we called it "sour grass" as it tasted like very tart lemonade. Not really a food so much as a snack.

Anyone every try acorns?

After reading the novel "Into the Forest" last fall, I decided to try acorns. We have lots of scrub oaks planted around the outside of our condo association. There are always lots of acorns laying around for the yard people to deal with. So I started picking up some after windstorms knocked them to the ground and kept them in plastic baggies till I had enough to try. Didn't gather enough in time, though, and some of the acorns started getting "wormy", so I ended up offering them to the Western Scrub-Jays. The ones that come to our feeder prefer shelled peanuts and meal worms, they're too spoiled. So I took them across the street to leave for the local squirrels. Maybe this up-coming fall I'll try again.

I was going to grind them and then pour hot water through coffee filters to get rid of the bitter tannins.
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Old 04-09-2009, 05:45 PM
 
Location: Southern California Mountains
563 posts, read 1,220,354 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Artful-Thang View Post
Anyone every try acorns?
I haven't but I'll tell you my goats love them! And the tannins in acorns and oak leaves and twigs assist the animals in ridding themselves of internal parasites. That may be why deer love them so much, besides the fattening effect they get from the acorns. Deer, elk and goats are ruminents, as in they have a compartmentalized stomach system and chew cud.

I am interested in the natural tanning of hides using the oak tannin process.
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Old 04-09-2009, 06:01 PM
 
3,761 posts, read 3,067,364 times
Reputation: 7653
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sizzly Friddle View Post
This is a myth. There is no rule of thumb to identify non-poisonous mushrooms. The only way to tell if a mushroom is edible is by correct identification.

I collect wild mushrooms, various wild greens, and blackberries.
Mushrooms are my favorite!
Sorry, I don't have any links.

That's why I won't mess with wild mushrooms. I can't identify them. I'd be scared to eat them.
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Old 04-09-2009, 06:02 PM
 
3,761 posts, read 3,067,364 times
Reputation: 7653
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artful-Thang View Post
Interesting thread. The only wild collected food I've ever eaten were oxalis stems as a kid...we called it "sour grass" as it tasted like very tart lemonade. Not really a food so much as a snack.

Anyone every try acorns?

After reading the novel "Into the Forest" last fall, I decided to try acorns. We have lots of scrub oaks planted around the outside of our condo association. There are always lots of acorns laying around for the yard people to deal with. So I started picking up some after windstorms knocked them to the ground and kept them in plastic baggies till I had enough to try. Didn't gather enough in time, though, and some of the acorns started getting "wormy", so I ended up offering them to the Western Scrub-Jays. The ones that come to our feeder prefer shelled peanuts and meal worms, they're too spoiled. So I took them across the street to leave for the local squirrels. Maybe this up-coming fall I'll try again.

I was going to grind them and then pour hot water through coffee filters to get rid of the bitter tannins.


I remember chewing on that sour grass as kids. Now that brought back some memories.
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