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Old 04-24-2009, 11:14 AM
 
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I've noticed that a lot of people on this forum get boneless, skinless chicken. I always get the regular kind, either whole or the larger family packs, depending on what's on sale, usually thighs or drumsticks, because I prefer dark meat. The bones are great for making chicken stock for soups and stews. I use the skins, too - those I chop into smaller pieces and render them slowly, along with any fat trimmed off the rest. The dogs love it, a spoonful of chicken fat with crackly bits on their kibbles. If you live in a place where it's dry, dogs [and cats] need a bit of extra oil to help keep their coats nice and shiny, and it also keeps them from having flaky, itchy skin. It's a lot cheaper than Linatone, and I alternate it with cod liver oil, which was recommended by my vet. Or if you enjoy kosher cooking, making your own chicken fat [you need to strain it, and the dogs still get the crunchy bits] is a lot cheaper than buying it.
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Old 04-24-2009, 02:06 PM
 
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Whole chicken is generally cheaper because they haven't cut it for you! We also prefer dark meat, but when we roast a whole chicken right, even the breast gets very tender!

I also believe dark meat is cheaper because most people buy breasts.
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Old 04-25-2009, 12:25 AM
RHB
 
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I like the boneless, skinless chicken breasts because I can do a lot with them, and I can get them at $1.17 a pound. However when I find quarters (or any other chicken) for less, I pick them up and use those for my stews, stir fries etc.
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Old 04-25-2009, 04:25 AM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
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I always get the rooster kind since folks will flat out give them to me for free. Chicken soup is guaranteed to cure crowing. Rendering out the fat works well, but generally my DH eats most of the crunchy bits before the dogs get them. Chittlins (I think that's the name for the crunchy bits?) probably aren't all that good for him, but he likes them anyway. The roosters don't generally have as much fat on them as I'd like, though, since they aren't the commercially raised frankenchickens found at the grocery store.

Generally, these are older roosters, old enough to crow which is why the folks want to get rid of them. After they have been slaughtered and cleaned, I'll put them in salt water in the refrigerator at least overnight so they can tenderize a bit. Then generally, they get boiled or cooked in the pressure cooker, then de-boned and the meat is shredded. That becomes chicken meat for soups, stews, tacos, sandwiches, etc. The water they were boiled in is some really tasty chicken stock. When it is cold it is a solid gelatin, too, so it is probably quite healthy. Chicken aspic, I guess it would be. Kinda interesting as a base for homemade Jell-o.
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Old 04-25-2009, 11:27 AM
 
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That's perfect for coq au vin!
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Old 04-25-2009, 12:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hotzcatz View Post
I always get the rooster kind since folks will flat out give them to me for free. Chicken soup is guaranteed to cure crowing. Rendering out the fat works well, but generally my DH eats most of the crunchy bits before the dogs get them. Chittlins (I think that's the name for the crunchy bits?) probably aren't all that good for him, but he likes them anyway. The roosters don't generally have as much fat on them as I'd like, though, since they aren't the commercially raised frankenchickens found at the grocery store.

Generally, these are older roosters, old enough to crow which is why the folks want to get rid of them. After they have been slaughtered and cleaned, I'll put them in salt water in the refrigerator at least overnight so they can tenderize a bit. Then generally, they get boiled or cooked in the pressure cooker, then de-boned and the meat is shredded. That becomes chicken meat for soups, stews, tacos, sandwiches, etc. The water they were boiled in is some really tasty chicken stock. When it is cold it is a solid gelatin, too, so it is probably quite healthy. Chicken aspic, I guess it would be. Kinda interesting as a base for homemade Jell-o.
And it would smell so much better than boiling calves' feet!

But my gran used to make a variety of aspics as cold salads in the summer. Those were good, but by the time I came along, she just used plain old Knox gelatin.
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Old 04-25-2009, 05:29 PM
 
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I buy skin on, bone in breasts at $0.99 a pound. That way I can roast them, get the crispy skin, white meat, and then use the bones for stock. You also don't lose as much to fat dripping off, so it seems like the best deal to me.

I'll still buy whole chickens, but only at $0.75 a pound or less.
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Old 04-25-2009, 06:29 PM
RHB
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spiderbear View Post
I buy skin on, bone in breasts at $0.99 a pound. That way I can roast them, get the crispy skin, white meat, and then use the bones for stock. You also don't lose as much to fat dripping off, so it seems like the best deal to me.

I'll still buy whole chickens, but only at $0.75 a pound or less.
Boy, where you are at chicken prices are low!!!
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Old 04-25-2009, 06:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RHB View Post
Boy, where you are at chicken prices are low!!!
I'm in Charlotte. The trick is, ethnic markets (hispanic especially), and shopping sales. I've gotten whole chickens for $0.39 a pound when they go on sale at the local hispanic market.
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Old 04-25-2009, 06:54 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karibear View Post
I've noticed that a lot of people on this forum get boneless, skinless chicken. I always get the regular kind, either whole or the larger family packs, depending on what's on sale, usually thighs or drumsticks, because I prefer dark meat. The bones are great for making chicken stock for soups and stews. I use the skins, too - those I chop into smaller pieces and render them slowly, along with any fat trimmed off the rest. The dogs love it, a spoonful of chicken fat with crackly bits on their kibbles. If you live in a place where it's dry, dogs [and cats] need a bit of extra oil to help keep their coats nice and shiny, and it also keeps them from having flaky, itchy skin. It's a lot cheaper than Linatone, and I alternate it with cod liver oil, which was recommended by my vet. Or if you enjoy kosher cooking, making your own chicken fat [you need to strain it, and the dogs still get the crunchy bits] is a lot cheaper than buying it.
The skin is the best part! You cook it until the skin is nice and crunchy and yum yum.

But I never buy cheap chicken. I prefer Smart Chicken which is a little more expensive than the regular "store bought" or "Tysons" (which is very big around here). But the flavor and hopefully, the nutrition, lack of chemicals is well worth an extra fifty cents or so a pound.

Again, food keeps you alive. Scrimping on your food is never a good idea.

That being said. We don't throw ANYTHING away. All parts of the chicken are used - even the little rib bones. LOL

20yrsinBranson
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