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Old 08-08-2009, 09:20 AM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,095 posts, read 12,745,934 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RHB View Post
I'm just wondering, what is it that makes you live frugally?
I was raised that way. Both parents grew up during the depression. Glad they taught me what they taught me, even if I did kinda blow it in my 20's.

Anyone else remember washing and re-using aluminum foil, until it fell apart?
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Old 08-08-2009, 03:46 PM
 
Location: San Diego CA
3,848 posts, read 2,903,940 times
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Funny how so many of us share common backgrounds. I too was the child of parents who grew up during the depression and who had to go to work immediately after HS to make a living. I grew up in a working class home and although never poor money was tight. Frugality was a necessity and not a choice. In my younger days I spent several years in the military mostly as a single enlisted man and even though I advanced through the ranks to NCO status basically all I had was a bed to sleep in and a wall locker to store a few clothes. I never felt slighted that this was all I had materially in life. My wife, who grew up in Southeast Asia, had a much harsher childhood. Even though I eventually went to college, graduated and had a well paid professional level job both of us kept our frugal values and have done quite well into retirement.
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Old 08-09-2009, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
2,221 posts, read 4,652,783 times
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Frugality was and is the key to retiring early and young enough to enjoy it. I've seen too many people shelve their dreams until their late 60s and 70s, and by then they had little or no quality time left to enjoy it.

Frugality in my working years allowed me to save more than enough to retire in my late 40s. Frugality in retirement allows me to live on my retirement income without fear. Because I have no debt, I am still able to bank well over half of my retirement income--so when the day does come that I need a new roof or a new car, I'll be able to pull the trigger without a second, worried thought.

No golf club membership, boat, trophy home, Mercedes-Benz, vacation cruise, designer furniture suite, private college tuition bill, latte habit, plastic surgery, horse, motor home, summer house or Rolex watch would have been worth more to me than ability to live the life I have now.
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Old 08-11-2009, 04:59 AM
 
35 posts, read 172,554 times
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Why I frugal?
Because money goes to money.
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Old 08-12-2009, 08:06 AM
 
Location: On a Farm & by the sea
1,081 posts, read 2,433,995 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gandalara View Post
I was raised that way. Both parents grew up during the depression. Glad they taught me what they taught me, even if I did kinda blow it in my 20's.

Anyone else remember washing and re-using aluminum foil, until it fell apart?
Hey Gandalara...rep to you! I think we all stumble on the financial path in some way....it's part of the learning process. Like you, I learned so many great lessons from my family which "stuck" but I made a few mistakes along the way as well. One piece of advice that mama taught me as a CHILD was to always protect your credit. I had my first checking account at 17 (my first job when I was nearly 14). Teaching kids about finance and personal money management should start in MIDDLE SCHOOL. I'm not kidding. YOu can't assume kids are getting this education at home so it should be integrated into the math/social studies curriculums. AND YES, I sent you rep because you made me laugh at recalling saving tin foil. I had to throw out so much of that when my beloved grandparents died and I cleaned out the farm. And just yesterday I rinsed out two ziplock bags to reuse It only takes a minute and it is so much better for the environment.
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Old 08-12-2009, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Pelham Pkwy (da Bronx)
966 posts, read 2,041,119 times
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I'm just not attached to material things, and so I don't need much. My happiness comes from my work, artistic life, close relationships, and spiritual practices. I learned some time ago that less is more. Better for me, for others, and the environment. I learned that if I want to live more of a full life I would have to learn to live on less and therefore work less--for an adequate but not extravagant wage or salary. I refuse to be a wage slave or a drone. Reading the books Your Money or Your Life and Simple Adundance was a real eye opener for me--so liberating.
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Old 08-19-2009, 03:53 AM
 
Location: On a Farm & by the sea
1,081 posts, read 2,433,995 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nala8 View Post
I'm just not attached to material things, and so I don't need much. My happiness comes from my work, artistic life, close relationships, and spiritual practices. I learned some time ago that less is more. Better for me, for others, and the environment. I learned that if I want to live more of a full life I would have to learn to live on less and therefore work less--for an adequate but not extravagant wage or salary. I refuse to be a wage slave or a drone. Reading the books Your Money or Your Life and Simple Adundance was a real eye opener for me--so liberating.
Those are two of my favorite books which I continue to re-read. Simple Living by Janet Luhrs (I believe that is the correct spelling) is another excellent read on the subject.
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Old 08-19-2009, 04:08 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
4,085 posts, read 7,449,901 times
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A few reasons...

Being a devout Christian, I believe that while God gave us everything we have, that is no excuse to be wasteful with it. That goes for money, food, energy, our environment, animals, etc. It's all ours to do what we want with, but in gratitude I want to use it wisely and efficiently.

Another reason is to keep my life simple so I can focus on the right priorities. Less money spent = less junk = less clutter = less worries. I have a problem with clutter as it is, so being frugal helps me not add to it and I can even eliminate clutter by using things creatively instead of buying new things.

Being frugal does cause me to get creative and therefore my life is enhanced. When I was less frugal, a "night out" to unwind after a long week of work meant going to dinner somewhere that would cost me at least $20 + tip and then going to a movie, concert, bar, or some other form of paid entertainment. Now, it often is a walk through a nice town or through NYC, dinner is inexpensive - either a sandwich or fruit I take with me or in NYC some of the great cheap eats, like "streetmeat" - and entertainment is window shopping, reading in a bookstore or library, enjoying nature, having a delicious coffee or tea or pastry or ice cream. For a full night out, I spend less than half of what dinner used to cost me.

I don't know if I'd be considered "frugal" by many; I don't focus on money. When the time comes for me to spend money on something that many "frugal" people consider wasteful, I break from their opinion. If I'm at a Mets game, I'm going to buy a sausage w/ pepper sandwich because it's part of my enjoyment of the experience, and it's something I can't bring to the game with me. Same with the overpriced soda. I save so much on the tickets anyway that it's not such a big deal. But a lot of "frugal" people would say, "$7 for a sausage and peppers??? That's CRAZY! You can buy it all at the store and cook it at home and it would cost you less than half that!!!" True, but I couldn't bring it to the game (they don't allow outside food), and even if I could, it would not be fresh and hot. Not to menntion it would take my time to prepare it, and then I'd have to lug it around.

So I guess I'm saying I consider myself "frugal", but all too often I see people who would not consider me "frugal" because where they equate frugality with $$$ amounts, I see it as much, much more thann $$$ amounts. I see frugality as being about reducing or eliminating any kind of waste through always seeking creative alternatives as solutions, while sacrificing nothing; while this often involves serious reductions in spending money and results in saving money, frugality ought to be about much more than just that money saved. I can save even more money by sacrificing a lot of things, but then I'd be miserable, with a little more money, and what good is that?
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Old 08-19-2009, 04:19 PM
RHB RHB started this thread
 
1,096 posts, read 1,831,747 times
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I agree, the whole point of being frugal is not to waste, and to have the money available for the things you really enjoy, like sausage and peppers at a ball game.
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Old 08-21-2009, 12:44 AM
 
Location: Philippines
62 posts, read 104,172 times
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The secret to getting financially rich is to live frugally. LOL. My grandpa's secret. LOL.
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