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Old 05-20-2009, 05:24 AM
 
Location: Florida
18,295 posts, read 18,560,123 times
Reputation: 21001

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I stopped in to visit a friend after shopping and shared my delight at having my grocery slip show that I paid $108 for $238 worth of groceries.
She wouldn't spend a second cutting coupons or traveling twice as far to a better priced store....well...she rarely cooks and eats out at least 6 times or more a week.
Last year cheerfully spent $10,000 on her daughters wedding.
Drives a 15 mpg SUV.

Later in the conversation she said "I've been trying to figure out how I can quit work and spend the winter in Florida like you do."
I laughed and said, "First, you have to turn into the type of person that gets a thrill when you save over 50% on your grocery bill!"
Neither of us criticizes the other on how we choose to spend and can take jokes about it from each other but....
We both took a big hit on our savings.....she suffered a big drop in income ( and we retired, losing the income) and we have had a much easier time in adjusting so I'm glad I am what I am....frugal by habit while she considers this as a troublesome hardship.
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Old 05-20-2009, 05:46 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,505 posts, read 49,588,323 times
Reputation: 24548
We have been frugal by applying the adage of "buy it once and keep it forever". We buy what we need (except for books - we buy way too many books), not necessarily what we want. The result will be being able to live in our home on our retirement income in a couple of years. Unless inflation destroys the value of the retirement.
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Old 05-20-2009, 07:26 AM
 
596 posts, read 2,496,179 times
Reputation: 201
Quote:
Originally Posted by old_cold View Post
I stopped in to visit a friend after shopping and shared my delight at having my grocery slip show that I paid $108 for $238 worth of groceries.
She wouldn't spend a second cutting coupons or traveling twice as far to a better priced store....well...she rarely cooks and eats out at least 6 times or more a week.
Last year cheerfully spent $10,000 on her daughters wedding.
Drives a 15 mpg SUV.

Later in the conversation she said "I've been trying to figure out how I can quit work and spend the winter in Florida like you do."
I laughed and said, "First, you have to turn into the type of person that gets a thrill when you save over 50% on your grocery bill!"
Neither of us criticizes the other on how we choose to spend and can take jokes about it from each other but....
We both took a big hit on our savings.....she suffered a big drop in income ( and we retired, losing the income) and we have had a much easier time in adjusting so I'm glad I am what I am....frugal by habit while she considers this as a troublesome hardship.
I saw something on t.v. about this and I want to do it so badly. I save coupons and then I carry them in to the grocery store but if the items are already too expensive I refuse to "waste" my coupon...I wait until it is on sale but half the time my coupon is expired by then

I also get coupons from the Sunday paper - which I dont receive but my neighbor gives me when she's done (I'm not being cheap, I never asked for it, but she comes to chat on Sunday mornings and offers it since she's already read it - and I love to get those coupons). Some coupons also come in magazines (I think its Good Housekeeping and another that I forget the name of it). The magazine coupons last the longest, in my experience. I also registered with PCH coupons online but wow, you sure go through some ink printing those off!

If you read this, I would love a step by step process of how I can save 50% off of my groceries. I want to do it so badly...
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Old 05-20-2009, 07:28 AM
 
596 posts, read 2,496,179 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GregW View Post
We have been frugal by applying the adage of "buy it once and keep it forever". We buy what we need (except for books - we buy way too many books), not necessarily what we want. The result will be being able to live in our home on our retirement income in a couple of years. Unless inflation destroys the value of the retirement.
I'm just curious why you dont go to the local library, borrow-read-return? Free! Alternatively, books at the Salvation Army near me are .99c and I read a ton of excellent books, all purchased there. Hardcovers are $1.99 but you can usually find the same book in softcover when you're there. I never read a book twice, so usually I end up giving them to my reader friends that enjoy the same ones I do.
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Old 05-20-2009, 07:40 AM
 
3,553 posts, read 6,789,383 times
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We've always been "frugal" (cheap to many people), neither of our families had much money when we were growing up. Through self-education, hard work and some timely real estate investments we were able to get our income up to the $150K/year range. When we took out our last (in all ways) mortgage the banker tried to tell us that we should be buying a house that cost 4 or 5 times as much! We stuck with the one we liked and paid the mortgage off within 2 years.

We always bought used cars until after we both retired, we generally kept our cars 5 to 7 years, we currently drive an '03 and '04, no plans to replace either soon. I change the air filters and do minor maintenance, we either use coupons or Wal-Mart for oil changes.

We clip coupons, although we're not anal about it, we buy our gas at the cheapest place in town and plan our road trips around which towns have good gas prices and look for coupons for hotels! Great savings on the latter. On the road we pick up bagels, fruit and milk/juice in the evening and have that for breakfast. A few dollars versus $15 or so to eat at Denny's or Cracker Barrel.

We've been fully retired for over 5 years now, still have the six figure income and still watch our money. Although we will splurge on something that we really like, some inexpensive art, and some high quality furniture.

golfgod
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Old 05-20-2009, 08:04 AM
 
596 posts, read 2,496,179 times
Reputation: 201
Quote:
Originally Posted by golfgod View Post
We've always been "frugal" (cheap to many people), neither of our families had much money when we were growing up. Through self-education, hard work and some timely real estate investments we were able to get our income up to the $150K/year range. When we took out our last (in all ways) mortgage the banker tried to tell us that we should be buying a house that cost 4 or 5 times as much! We stuck with the one we liked and paid the mortgage off within 2 years.

We always bought used cars until after we both retired, we generally kept our cars 5 to 7 years, we currently drive an '03 and '04, no plans to replace either soon. I change the air filters and do minor maintenance, we either use coupons or Wal-Mart for oil changes.

We clip coupons, although we're not anal about it, we buy our gas at the cheapest place in town and plan our road trips around which towns have good gas prices and look for coupons for hotels! Great savings on the latter. On the road we pick up bagels, fruit and milk/juice in the evening and have that for breakfast. A few dollars versus $15 or so to eat at Denny's or Cracker Barrel.

We've been fully retired for over 5 years now, still have the six figure income and still watch our money. Although we will splurge on something that we really like, some inexpensive art, and some high quality furniture.

golfgod
Thats AMAZING - good going!!
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Old 05-20-2009, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,738 posts, read 47,532,009 times
Reputation: 17595
One method of being frugal when you vacation is to first live near the vacation spot. For a few years my employer had me working in Scotland. So we had a home there, and took the train to London. Or drove to Sterling, or to Edinburgh, or to Glasgow. We flew to Dublin one year for St. Patricks Day, it was a short [and cheap] flight.

Later my employer had me working in Italy. So while living there my Dw drove repeatedly to Paris for vacation. We took a car-ferry to Greece for vacation one year. I skied the Matterhorn, a massive ski resort that straddles the border; on the Italy side is Cervinia [a very low priced resort] on the Swiss side is Zermatt [a very expensive resort]. Both sides are connected via ski slopes. We also drove to Rome, Venice, Vinci [home of "Leonardo of Vinci"]. We were very near to Pompeii, and took everyone who visited us there.

Now we use a CC that offers airmiles. So we can fly for free, while only paying the airport taxes. I find that I must go to the West coast next month, so I booked round-trip flights and it only cost me around $10.
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Old 05-20-2009, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Texas
42,262 posts, read 49,821,133 times
Reputation: 67103
When we go on vacation (whether it's Hawaii or a resort in the Carib), we always hit the grocery store. Places like that will kill you on food and drink. Hit the store, stock up on sammich meats, bread, snacks, and booze there. Stick it in your minifridge, and you can easily save $500 to $1000 just on one trip. And when you do eat out, it can be somewhere nice and guilt-free.
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Old 05-20-2009, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
8,957 posts, read 17,019,090 times
Reputation: 7193
Quote:
Originally Posted by jctx View Post
How do those with great income and nice things and by all appearances seem to be like any other individual/family manage to continue being frugal when others are "pulling" for restaurant meals, shopping trips to malls, etc? We ENJOY being frugal, but we are not necessarily poor. We find the spending of other's kind of wasteful but we dont judge - its their own choice. But its hard sometimes when they want to do something expensive and we're just not into it as much as going to the park/beach/lake/playing games/free concerts, etc etc. Its almost like the opposite of keeping up with the Joneses.
Those who "appear" rich are often neck deep in debt to support a life-
style the can't really afford. Then again the those that live lightly often
have a sock full of money they don't use cause they feel they don't need
it.

A good book on this topic is the "Millionaire next Door" that details
how these hidden rich live and why they live that way.
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Old 05-20-2009, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,045 posts, read 18,274,411 times
Reputation: 15573
Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
I would urge everyone with a good income to live frugally, to invest and to prepare lest a disaster come to their doorstep.

Forest Beekeeper, I've seen your posts on other threads and they are interesting. I have a friend who wants me to move to Southern Maine, inland. You quoted your prop taxes somewhere, and they were so low. We were looking at Sanford, Shapleigh and Wells areas. Only thing is we would want to avoid private water/sewer, as there's not much in the budget to take care of those things if anything goes wrong. Are there inland towns that have public water/sewer and low prop taxes that are not far out in the country? Being in our 60s we're no longer able to do back to the land. Thanks for your insights...

~~NewEnglGirl
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