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Old 05-29-2009, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
1,820 posts, read 3,899,868 times
Reputation: 1896

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randomdude View Post
Here is a sticking point....what is your definition of "not alot of money". I refuse to pay more then $20 for any piece of clothing, period (shoes included). If it is $20, then it better be a very nice pair of slacks for work.

To me, over $20 is "a lot of money". On the other hand, Ive heard people refer to things that are $20 as "cheap", and I even have known people who wouldnt be caught dead in something that cost $20.

I actually got in an argument with someone about eating out, and they refused to be convinced that $100 wasnt completely unreasonable for one meal, and even argued that it was a "cheap date".
Oh yikes... well... I was thinking a little more than $20 for a Communion dress. I assume that yes,our definition on what is "not a lot of money" is a little different-which is fine
I am not the one claiming to be frugal,(I truly wish that I was better at it,I try but for some reason,I can never seem to find those good deals!)
but our friends I am talking about are,sometimes... here is the thing that kind of bothers me...
They ask to borrow a communion dress,but yet,they spend money on buying the latest new release DVD AND even had to purchase the limited edition one of "Iron Man" because it came in a special dvd case that looked like Iron Man??
Strange I think to be willing to spend $30 on a ridiculous dvd (at the age of 40) but yet ask to borrow a special dress and lecture others on how they spend their money... it honestly makes no sense.
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Old 05-29-2009, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
5,517 posts, read 8,765,629 times
Reputation: 2530
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYMD67 View Post
Oh yikes... well... I was thinking a little more than $20 for a Communion dress. I assume that yes,our definition on what is "not a lot of money" is a little different-which is fine
I am not the one claiming to be frugal,(I truly wish that I was better at it,I try but for some reason,I can never seem to find those good deals!)
but our friends I am talking about are,sometimes... here is the thing that kind of bothers me...
They ask to borrow a communion dress,but yet,they spend money on buying the latest new release DVD AND even had to purchase the limited edition one of "Iron Man" because it came in a special dvd case that looked like Iron Man??
Strange I think to be willing to spend $30 on a ridiculous dvd (at the age of 40) but yet ask to borrow a special dress and lecture others on how they spend their money... it honestly makes no sense.
I do agree with your argument there regardless of the definition of "cheap". It is rediculous that a person will find money for something frivolous for themselves, but scrimpt on something far more important, like a communion dress. Thats not frugal my friend, thats what is called selfish. If there were a few points in time I would probably spend more money then I would normally ever spend, they would be on special occassions for my kids, such as graduations, weddings, or if I were religious, religious passages.

To not spend money on your children, and instead, spend it on yourself, especially when its between a stupid DVD, and a once in a liftetime event, is a sign of being a terrible and selfish parent undeserving of a child, in my opinion.

In my experience, the people who are loudest about touting their frugality (and I dont mean the ones who say "I cant afford it", I mean the ones that are so in your face that they tell you how to spend your money, and criticize others purchases), are usually in this ilk. They will scrimpt on some things, primarily items for kids, gifts for relatives, parties for others, outings that might cost them money that isnt directly spent on themselves, however, they will amazingly come up with the money for a $30 DVD for themselves, or a new Mercedes for themselves.
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Old 08-09-2009, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Valley City, ND
625 posts, read 1,607,043 times
Reputation: 527
Quote:
Originally Posted by Houston3 View Post
Milk today is less than $3.50 a gallon (and as low as $2.95) and bread is $1.19 for a large loaf where I live...Where are you paying $4.50 for a quart of milk ?

Wow, that's cheap milk. Where do you live?

We've been paying $2.59-$2.89 for years for a 1/2 gallon of skim. On super duper sale, bread may be $1.19 a loaf, but a limit of 1 or 2 loaves. It's usually more like $1.79
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Old 08-09-2009, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA
10,715 posts, read 19,061,208 times
Reputation: 14693
I'm picking up milk tomorrow - it's on special on Mon. and Tues. for $2.39/gallon.

3-Oaks - why are you buying 1/2 gallons? It's generally less expensive to buy a gallon - skim especially will last a long time. If you won't use it all, freeze some when it's a good price.
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Old 08-09-2009, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Valley City, ND
625 posts, read 1,607,043 times
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We don't use a lot of milk and it never goes on sale here. The price may fluctuate a couple cents here & there over a month, but you'd really have to to the store almost every day to catch it. Neither hubby or I like the taste of frozen milk, either.

I believe I heard somewhere that ND has some of the highest milk prices in the country.

Last edited by 3-Oaks; 08-09-2009 at 08:06 PM.. Reason: typo
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Old 08-10-2009, 05:16 AM
 
370 posts, read 884,963 times
Reputation: 659
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
Becoming ILL is not inevitable even though popular culture would have you believe this. Older people can live long, healthy, active and very productive lives. My mother is 82 and has more energy than I do. Getting old does not necessarily equate to getting feeble or incapable. I detest that mindset.

20yrsinBranson
This is so true, excellent statement. I'm in the medical field and see many older people in their 80s and even 90s who could run circles around those in their 20s-30s the way a majority of society is nowadays ( lazy, fat, unfit)
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Old 08-10-2009, 07:09 AM
 
Location: On a Farm & by the sea
1,081 posts, read 2,433,518 times
Reputation: 920
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigg Mann View Post
My wife and I live very frugal to but not by choice. I am disabled and no income, and wife makes 7.50/hr at her job and lucky to have it.

There is nothing wrong with living like this but I don't know why anyone would want to live like this on purpose.

It sucks and is depressing, and you are unable to do anything other than exist.
Hi Bigg Man. I'm sorry that your situation is depressing for you. I hope that you can take comfort in the fact that you have a home and food and a wife....those things alone are great blessings that many folks right here in the US don't enjoy. I know it seems trite, but counting all of the good things in our life daily helps to breed optimism and dispel depression. The great American disease, beside mass consumerism, is constant comparative living. We are constantly comparing our lives to others around us and those we see on television/movies. The frugal thing isn't nearly as enjoyable when it is not a situation of our choosing but it can still be fulfilling in any event....... much luck to you!!!!
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Old 08-10-2009, 10:20 AM
 
11,432 posts, read 19,448,624 times
Reputation: 18135
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
Becoming ILL is not inevitable even though popular culture would have you believe this. Older people can live long, healthy, active and very productive lives. My mother is 82 and has more energy than I do. Getting old does not necessarily equate to getting feeble or incapable. I detest that mindset.

20yrsinBranson
My mom is also 82, walks two miles a day, goes to water aerobics a couple times a week and golfs during the summer.

But make no mistake -- she didn't do this alone. She did this by taking her health seriously and going to the doctor for regular check ups. Her aunt -- who is 100 and still works in her little garden daily and takes walks did the same thing.

These wellness checks caught diabetes early and diet controllable. And hypothyroidism....
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Old 08-13-2009, 12:00 AM
 
12,607 posts, read 14,613,304 times
Reputation: 14105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallysmom View Post
My mom is also 82, walks two miles a day, goes to water aerobics a couple times a week and golfs during the summer.

But make no mistake -- she didn't do this alone. She did this by taking her health seriously and going to the doctor for regular check ups. Her aunt -- who is 100 and still works in her little garden daily and takes walks did the same thing.

These wellness checks caught diabetes early and diet controllable. And hypothyroidism....
I saw it firsthand over the last year. My stepmother, who just turned 90 this summer, has congestive heart failure and gets out of breath and tired easily. That coupled with the winter and not wanting to get out in the cold weather, and being in the house with my dad all the time with not much to do, and sleeping a lot out of boredom probably, and by May she was unable to do any activities of daily living on her own. She couldn't stand, walk, bathe, toilet, eat, dress or anything else on her own. She was falling a lot. She ended up in a hospital and then she was sent to a nursing facility for physical therapy. I had no hope that she would get strong enough to get out of there, but she did. She can now do all the things mentioned above by herself and is stronger than she has been in a couple of years. She knows now that she can't get lazy. She still has the shortness of breath and tiredness from the congestive heart failure, but she gets out and walks a block, goes to the store, gets up and cooks meals and moves around the house and was even decluttering a couple of weeks ago.

That made me realize how important it is to stay active. If she had just stayed active she never would have gotten to the debilitated condition she was in. I'm amazed at the progress she has made.
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Old 08-13-2009, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Valley City, ND
625 posts, read 1,607,043 times
Reputation: 527
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tinabean View Post
......... The frugal thing isn't nearly as enjoyable when it is not a situation of our choosing but it can still be fulfilling in any event....... much luck to you!!!!

I was alway taught that being broke is the state of your pocketbook. Being poor is a state of mind.
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