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Old 10-30-2013, 02:50 PM
MJ7
 
6,221 posts, read 8,194,122 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brynach View Post
Keep in mind that what is one persons $150 dollars is not another. For instance is she buying every bit of food she will be consuming that month?
yup, i workout and for work somedays i might burn upwards of 2000 cals just at work, so i need to eat around 3000 cals a day, thats harded but not impossible to do on a 150$ budget, just need to buy in bulk
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Old 10-31-2013, 03:21 PM
 
1,988 posts, read 2,303,406 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ7 View Post
it comes down to quality. ive had 13 dollar ones and they were superior in every way. of course this is just pre made chicken. i need to do a price comparison on meat. i shop at whole foods, and i almost only buy their 365 brand, everything else is way over priced, but even their 365 brand is over priced on a few items. i can get non rbgh beef for 5.99 lb, the other super markets carry it for the same price, but the regular rbgh treated beef. i just have to buy in bulk and freeze it, something ive been neglecting to do.
Did you really pay 13.00 for a rotisserie chicken? I can't recall ever seeing one priced that high. I can't imagine the taste would be so different. The beef price from Whole Foods you got was quite good.
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Old 10-31-2013, 07:37 PM
MJ7
 
6,221 posts, read 8,194,122 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ebbe View Post
Did you really pay 13.00 for a rotisserie chicken? I can't recall ever seeing one priced that high. I can't imagine the taste would be so different. The beef price from Whole Foods you got was quite good.
yea they are 13 for local organic chickens...they are superior in every way to the 6 dollar ones, but im not saying the 6 dollar ones arent good, cuz most of those are good tasting.

if you buy the beef in family packs its cheaper, thats what i need to do, buy in bulk and just freeze the rest.

i usually buy chicken thighs, they are almost half the price, and to me they taste better and have more fat, which is something i prefer to the breasts.

Last edited by MJ7; 10-31-2013 at 07:46 PM..
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Old 11-01-2013, 10:49 AM
 
17,749 posts, read 15,026,257 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ebbe View Post
Did you really pay 13.00 for a rotisserie chicken? I can't recall ever seeing one priced that high. I can't imagine the taste would be so different. The beef price from Whole Foods you got was quite good.

Depends. Outside the run of the mill CAFO broiler from factory farms a frozen chicken might be that much.
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Old 11-01-2013, 11:01 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eastmemphisguy View Post
This thread reminds me of my immigrant grandmother. She knew her way around a grocery budget! Basically, you pair the low cost foods everybody has mentioned with cooking in bulk and living on frozen and reheated meals that you cooked on your day off. Have a pitcher of water in the fridge, and maybe also a cheap lemonade/fruity drink mix when you (or the grandkids) want something sweet. It's not a glamorous way to live, but you do what you have to sometimes. Time is just as big an obstacle as cost. We could all do this easily if we had all day to plan meals out. But nobody does. We all have busy lives. Eventually, you figure out what foods keep better than others. She didn't make rice often, for example, because it doesn't freeze well at all.
Always seems like people have time for TV or in this case City-Data. Helps to know what time slots one has. One day during the week can make it for the whole week. If they doesn't work one week then that is when one has and omelet for dinner or other such things. And if eating is such a low priority time wise then you pay for someone else's time or eat fruit and peanuts or other unprocessed food. However if you can spend 30 minutes a day on food then you have a problem....a serious problem.

An old time grandma, my kind of grandma would make a sour drink from gooseberries.
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Old 11-01-2013, 02:39 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,095 posts, read 12,740,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post
This was a side topic from another thread. I have a friend who is a single woman that claims she lives on a $150/month food budget. Some people thought this was doable, but I couldn't see how.

So... this seems like a good topic for a thread. How do you guys do it? I'm open to the idea but I can't quite grasp how you eat three nutritious meals a day on $5 a day. Please give as many specifics as possible, and remember I'm talking about living on a budget like that all year long (this person is not fasting or trying to lose weight). A grocery list would be great.
According to my Quicken, I've averaged $33.69 on groceries per week since January 1. Some weeks I'll spend $100, and then not set foot in a grocery store for 4 to 5 weeks.
This includes paper products, pet food, personal hygiene, etc etc.

Single person household.
I shop sales, freeze, stock up. Know your prices!
Example - around here, cheese is usually $5 a pound. It goes on sale for $3, I buy 10 pounds.
I am not a vegetarian. I eat beef or chicken every day. I use frozen vegetables and fruit more than fresh. I don't drink milk.
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Old 11-01-2013, 03:28 PM
 
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We've been shopping very frugal of late and are averaging $80 per week at the grocery store for a family of four. This includes things like soap and toilet paper or what I call "non-food items" that we also buy at the grocery store.

It helps that it has been cold outside, so I'm doing a lot of soups, chicken, curries, and other dishes in the slow cooker - things that I make one day and then we have the leftovers the next day or we freeze for lunches.

The chickens I buy are $5 or $6 and I rub them with herbs and cook them in a slow cooker. I do not add any water. The recipe is from the Not Your Mother's Slow Cooker Cookbook. It turns out great. We take the meat off the bones and keep it in the fridge. We use it in soups, noodles, tacos, enchiladas, quesadillas, nachos, over beans and rice, etc. It goes a long way. And the bones make good stock.

The hardest part is having teenagers who are constantly "grazing" in the kitchen. Sometimes I'll have plans for something, but they will come in and eat whatever it is up before I have a chance to use it. For example, bacon was one sale recently so I bought a bunch and cooked it up - we were going to use it for BLT's and potato salad and other things. Well, the teenagers found the bacon cooling on the kitchen counter as I was out of the room and proceeded to eat half of it. Who can resist a crisp delicious platter of fresh bacon sitting right there in front of you?

I have to have "grazing" items on hand at all times for the teens. Otherwise problems arise! the chicken already cooked and shredded in the fridge helps with this: they like to take some of this and put it in-between tortillas or on top of tortilla chips with some cheese and peppers and warm it up so the cheese melts for a quick snack. I also keep fruit washed and ready as well as things like carrot sticks and celery sticks cut and ready to grab and eat. I buy yogurt cups when they go on sale, otherwise they are too expensive and you also have to watch out for the sugar content.
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Old 11-01-2013, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
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you sound like a great parent
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Old 11-01-2013, 06:24 PM
 
Location: On the Edge of the Fringe
4,634 posts, read 3,729,259 times
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Yeah, I am very interested in this thread.
1 We live close to Publix. It is convenient, clean, well stocked, friendly and Expensive as having a Kobe steaks cooked in Tokyo by Iron Chef Saki. Out of being close by, I spent almost $50 for three bags of food today enough for maybe two days worth of meals.

I visit Save A Lot twice a month, I go in and buy the following items: 10 frozen sandwiches(for the kid's lunch) $1 each. I buy anything and everything that looks good, and is priced good. Problem is, some of their generic/off brands are not good, produce is very limited, hit or miss. I bought 3 lbs yellow onions for 99 cents, all good, still not finished with them. Also 3 lbs red apples, all good, 99 cents.
Since it is out of the way, I stop by on my way home. I do not make a trip there.

SO I would love to know how to budget less for food and still have quality meals.
Now, many of my clients are on foodstamps, which will decrease tonight to an average of $1.40 per person per meal. This is of concern for me, especially for those who are disabled, ill and in need of proper nutrition.
I would love to know more secrets for feeding oneself for !.40 meal.

My suggestions: Avoid frozen dinners (which are 89 cents at sae a lot) and have enough salt to make my heart patients buy a trip to the ER.
Avoid Pasta, this is just a carbohydrate that fends off starvation, awful for my diabetic patients.
Avoid boxes of sugary cereals. (that is obvious)

I suggest Buying Rice and beans in bulk, as well as frozen corn. If a person has a good freezer, then buying frozen veggies and storing them in the freezer is better than buying can. Fresh is best, for some though on stamps and such, this is not an option so much as farmer's markets may not take them.

I would suggest that if possible, if time permits, make your own bread. Buy yeast, flour, sugar, make a few dozen rolls, throw the extras in the freezer. Cheaper, maybe not, but Healthier? Absolutely.
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Old 11-01-2013, 09:35 PM
 
2,798 posts, read 2,472,776 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ebbe
Did you really pay 13.00 for a rotisserie chicken? I can't recall ever seeing one priced that high. I can't imagine the taste would be so different. The beef price from Whole Foods you got was quite good.


Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ7 View Post
yea they are 13 for local organic chickens...they are superior in every way to the 6 dollar ones, but im not saying the 6 dollar ones arent good, cuz most of those are good tasting.

if you buy the beef in family packs its cheaper, thats what i need to do, buy in bulk and just freeze the rest.

i usually buy chicken thighs, they are almost half the price, and to me they taste better and have more fat, which is something i prefer to the breasts.

It seems that there is a big difference in the quality of chicken. I used to buy the cheapest chicken that I could buy, generally about 89 or 99 cents a pound on sale for thighs and/or legs. When I baked them in the oven, I never used any cooking oil, but twice during the baking I had to take them out and drain the grease out of the pan. And this was chicken that was labeled "all natural". There were literally jars of grease/juice that came out. I then started buying the organic chicken at the same supermarket at several times the price and baked them the same way in the oven, without cooking oil of any kind. No grease/juice or any liquid of any kind came out, and there was a big difference in taste. Also, I did not get the queasy feeling in my stomach after eating them, as I did with the cheap chicken. Sometimes paying a little more, or even a lot more is worth it.
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