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Old 11-02-2013, 10:08 PM
 
Location: Southern Oregon
785 posts, read 769,794 times
Reputation: 880

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MJ7 View Post
yea they are 13 for local organic chickens...they are superior in every way to the 6 dollar ones, but im not saying the 6 dollar ones arent good, cuz most of those are good tasting.

if you buy the beef in family packs its cheaper, thats what i need to do, buy in bulk and just freeze the rest.

i usually buy chicken thighs, they are almost half the price, and to me they taste better and have more fat, which is something i prefer to the breasts.

I second the chicken thighs. They are so much better than breasts in many things. And if you save the bones of course...there's soup stock!
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Old 11-03-2013, 05:32 PM
 
2 posts, read 2,295 times
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I've done between $100-150 every month for the past year or so on groceries. I'm a pescatarian, but I rarely buy fish (but if I go out to eat, I almost always get something with seafood). I get fruits/vegetables that are in season, shop for the best prices and cook my own meals from scratch and use coupons when I find them. I do my shopping in the organic section as far as grains go (Oatmeal, flours) and average around $20-30 a week. Its also just me, so when I cook I end up with a weeks worth of leftovers (and freeze when I get tired of it).
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Old 11-03-2013, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Southern Oregon
785 posts, read 769,794 times
Reputation: 880
What would be more helpful would be a synopis of HOW those who say they can, actually do it. Show some shopping habits and meals/menus and give us a rough lay out.
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Old 11-04-2013, 09:17 AM
 
5,945 posts, read 12,719,242 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brynach View Post
What would be more helpful would be a synopis of HOW those who say they can, actually do it. Show some shopping habits and meals/menus and give us a rough lay out.
  • No soda or juice/sugary drinks.
  • No prepackaged foods.
  • No junk food.
  • Stay away from things that have artificial colors, dyes, flavorings, etc.
  • Shop the perimeter of the store: stay out of the middle aisles.
  • Shop bulk and reuse your own containers.
  • One of our local CSA's gives us discounts when we volunteer with them.
  • Buy meat (such as half a cow, etc.) direct from grower; have it butchered and freeze it.
  • Figure out which veggies/herbs you use often and try to grow them from seed.
  • Relates to above: find and participate in a community garden.
  • Barter for food items, like eggs. (I trade my kids outgrown clothes for farm fresh eggs.)
  • Eat less. Meals really don't need to be larger than your fist.
  • Eat simple. A grain, a protein, a veg.
  • Snack on things like popcorn, fruit, veggies, homemade baked goods, bread and crackers.
  • When things you actually use go on sale, stock up.
  • DO NOT be tempted to buy things just because they are on sale or you have a coupon. Only buy the things you actually regularly use.
  • We discovered that by reduce the amount of trash we create, we saved money at the grocery store. It takes some retraining of habits and really thinking about what you buy and how it is packaged.
  • If you drink coffee or tea - find one that is good on its own so that you don't have to "doctor it up" which is unhealthy and wastes money.
  • A 5 gallon bucket grows a LOT of broccoli! Be prepared to share with neighbors...
  • Try to limit or omit eating out. If you do eat out, seek out good deals. (CostCo hot dogs come with a drink and are like $1.50 and they are huge.)
  • Bring your own bags - those nickels add up.
  • Sometimes if you ask for a case discount, you'll get lucky. For example, recently apples were on sale, we bought a case and asked for the case discount. We got a really good deal on those apples.
  • Find a gleaners group in your area.
This list could keep going... there's lots you can do to save money. A lot of it sounds like common sense, like it would be easy to do... but really it takes time to create these kinds of habits if they are new to you.
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Old 11-04-2013, 11:12 PM
 
47,576 posts, read 58,699,632 times
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3 doz eggs $4, 2 loaves of bread $4, 2 gallons of milk (1/2 gal/week) $6, peanut butter $4, 2 pound bags of carrots, $, 4 cucumbers $4, 4 heads of lettuce $6, all meat hotdogs (8) $5, buns $2, half gallon of ice cream $3, 8 pounds of meat (2 pounds per week) $40, bag of raw potatoes $5, apples/pears $10, gallon of orange juice $4, 4 boxes cereal $12, cheese $10 --- total of $123 so far

Still plenty of extra money left for beans, rice, more vegetables and fruit.
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Old 11-04-2013, 11:51 PM
 
Location: Long Neck,De
4,793 posts, read 6,503,464 times
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If you really need to budget in that range how about making soup .A package of dried beans and some bouillon cubes can make a soup lasting for a few days. Try some dried peas,chicken bouillon cubes and a ham bone in a big pot bring to a boil and let it simmer for hours. Chicken bouillon sound strange? Try it!
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Old 11-05-2013, 09:07 PM
MJ7
 
6,221 posts, read 8,191,806 times
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the 150 marker would be hard if you are trying to build muscle, but its still possible, you just have to get a strict diet plan and stick to it. i would not include eating out in the grocery bill per month though, as that should go under entertainment.
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Old 11-06-2013, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 69,881,813 times
Reputation: 27519
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brynach View Post
What would be more helpful would be a synopis of HOW those who say they can, actually do it. Show some shopping habits and meals/menus and give us a rough lay out.
Stay away from the freezer aisle and preprocessed food.
The exceptions I make to that are bags of veggies and ice cream.

I make dinners that last for 2 meals.
Meat loaf, mac and cheese and then some veggies is one example.
A roasted chicken can last for 2-3 meals if you make filling sides (rice, pasta based).

Have breakfast for dinner
Pancakes and bacon/sausage or an omelet.

Lots of pasta and rice as side dishes.
I flavor my rice with bullion cubes (beef or chicken) and add some vegetables for a medley.
Cheaper to make your own then buy pre-made.

I buy store brand with a few exceptions based on taste (National brand just tastes better).

I also have a dog and cats which are included in my food shopping and I average about $160-$170/month.
I do food shopping every other week.

And I do buy "junk food" like chips, soda, ice cream, bakery cakes...the store brand is much cheaper.
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Old 11-06-2013, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Great State of Texas
86,093 posts, read 69,881,813 times
Reputation: 27519
Quote:
Originally Posted by longnecker View Post
If you really need to budget in that range how about making soup .A package of dried beans and some bouillon cubes can make a soup lasting for a few days. Try some dried peas,chicken bouillon cubes and a ham bone in a big pot bring to a boil and let it simmer for hours. Chicken bouillon sound strange? Try it!
I use those bullion cubes for flavoring rice and vegetables.
Toss one cube in the pot while cooking.
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Old 11-07-2013, 08:59 AM
 
5,945 posts, read 12,719,242 times
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You can also make your own bouillon: Bouillon: Call it portable soup | Food | The Register-Guard | Eugene, Oregon

If you Google "homemade bouillon" you'll find lots of recipes, youtube videos, etc. It tastes way better and this way you know exactly what's going into it. Plus you might already have everything you need on hand which means you don't have to go out and buy anything.

I'm a big fan of bouillon, stock, broth, soups, etc.! They really do save you a lot of money while offering a very healthful way to satisfy just about any appetite.

I buy miso in tubs. Miso is very versatile and makes really good soups, dips, and dressings.
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