U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Frugal Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-07-2014, 06:41 AM
Status: "I am in preparation mode!" (set 5 days ago)
 
5,514 posts, read 5,496,825 times
Reputation: 4210

Advertisements

I did my budget and I need to figure a way to make $85.00 per month work. How often do you shop?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-07-2014, 06:42 AM
 
1,346 posts, read 1,003,768 times
Reputation: 4390
Quote:
Originally Posted by blanker View Post
I don't eat a lot of meat. I love noodles. I also eat smaller portions, and sit down to eat 3 times, no snacking between. For example, breakfast every work day is one cup cold cereal + milk. That's it. Weekends I don't eat breakfast. Work day lunch is maybe a sandwich and water. Sometimes I skip lunch. I think those 2 meals is where I save the most. Plus not eating out at all. Keep in mind, it's just me I'm buying food for.
I admire your discipline, but I would get tired of cereal and a sandwich everyday. Just curious do you buy any beverages besides milk.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-08-2014, 08:38 AM
 
16,487 posts, read 20,332,656 times
Reputation: 16136
I know this is an old original post, but I thought I would give my opinion. In my early 30's I had very little money period, so of course that included food. There are a lot of things you can do, some of which I did and others not. I would imagine that you are low-income. If so you may qualify for food stamps to help out. You would also qualify for your local food bank. Most towns, even small ones have soup kitchens as they are called. They usually serve soup but also all sorts of other thing. As far as having $150 a mo. for food, all of the things I have listed above will help reduce you monthly food bill. If you are a good hunter you could get a license and go out hunting for moose, deer, caribou, or whatever large animals live in your area. When you food shop find yourself some store coupons as well as weekly things on sale. Things like Top Ramen, eggs, etc. can go a long way. One really good thing you could go if you have your own yard or access to some land, is make a garden. Plant all kinds of veggies that grow well in your area. Plant fruit trees or things such as raspberries, blueberries, or blackberries. All of this can go a long way.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-08-2014, 09:41 AM
 
Location: All Over
3,971 posts, read 4,195,107 times
Reputation: 2999
I think for a single person this is totally doable. I can go to aldi and spend $40 to $60 and walk out with almost a full two weeks worth of groveries including fruits, veggies, meats, etc. Checkout on pinterest there's some great posts like how to make 100 meals for under $150 at aldi and things like that where they include a shopping list and recipes. Now granted this does require some behavior changes, you cant eat mainly meat for most meals as that would be expensive but assuming your okay with going heavy fruits, veggies, beans rice with aside of meat which is how most of the rest of the world eats and what is considered healthy anyway Ican easiy see itbeingdone. Again though, you cantbebuying expensive snacks or all meat,does require you to make changes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-08-2014, 11:20 AM
 
506 posts, read 414,115 times
Reputation: 1365
Even with meat if you know how to buy stuff it's cheap.

I just came from the store with about 3 lbs of Salmon, 10 cans of tuna, 4 cans of peeled tomatos, 7 lbs of chicken breast, and about 10 lbs of other meats (beef and pork).

Total cost? 46 dollars.

Produce can be easily be had on the cheap ... for example I saw one person saying they bought 5 liters of soup for 20 dollars. That to me is expensive since I can easily buy potatos, some carrots, or other produce and make a 5 liter soup for maybe 3 dollars.

I usually in terms of produce buy green beans, black eyed peas, chick peas, mushrooms, onions, parsley, coriander, peppers, spinach, lettuce, carrots and so on...

I probavly spend 75 a person a month. I could probably go lower if I put some effort into it ..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2014, 12:07 PM
 
506 posts, read 414,115 times
Reputation: 1365
Another thing is serving size!

People here in the US eat WAY TOO MUCH.

I can only speak from my wife's family perspective, who they are not fat by any standards but they still eat a lot of food. Just the other day we got chinese take away for like 8 dollars each. The damn container as filled with noodles, rice, chicken and some other stuff.

I'm not a small guy, nor I eat that little, but both her mother and father ate like half the container or a little more. I on the other hand already had 2 meals out of it, and still have like at least 3 more meals from it!

Each meal I have is about the size of a cereal plastic bowl with noodles and chicken, and no, it's not packed in the bowl. It's about a bowl of normal laid down noodles and spaghetti and such. I'd say the size of 2-2.5 fists in terms of size.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-11-2014, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,119 posts, read 9,413,466 times
Reputation: 9423
Quote:
Originally Posted by doodlemagic View Post
I think for a single person this is totally doable. I can go to aldi and spend $40 to $60 and walk out with almost a full two weeks worth of groveries including fruits, veggies, meats, etc. Checkout on pinterest there's some great posts like how to make 100 meals for under $150 at aldi and things like that where they include a shopping list and recipes. Now granted this does require some behavior changes, you cant eat mainly meat for most meals as that would be expensive but assuming your okay with going heavy fruits, veggies, beans rice with aside of meat which is how most of the rest of the world eats and what is considered healthy anyway Ican easiy see itbeingdone. Again though, you cantbebuying expensive snacks or all meat,does require you to make changes.
Bingo! I've found what's posted above to be the secret to low grocery bills--and good health.

Buy seasonal fruits/vegetables and when on sale. A "loaded" baked potato topped with veggies is nutritious, delicious--and cheap.

Make rice (brown is best) and barley and lentils your friends. Use lots of a variety of beans. Canned beans if time is short or dried if you have a slow cooker or more time. Add in small amounts of animal protein if you wish (but not necessary for good health).

Eggs are inexpensive protein and a veggie omelet is a good meal anytime. Oatmeal is great for breakfast -- get the real deal instead of the flavor-enhanced expensive envelopes.

Avoid items with lots of packaging -- why pay for fancy wrappers, boxes?

Skip the snack/junk food aisles...low nutrition and pricey.

Skip buying prepared foods. Learn to cook simple easy meals yourself without loads of added chemicals and preservatives.

Drink water or herbal teas, period.

I've been a frugal cook for lots of years and DH and I enjoy low grocery bills and good health using the above methods and ingredients.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-13-2014, 10:21 AM
Status: "I am in preparation mode!" (set 5 days ago)
 
5,514 posts, read 5,496,825 times
Reputation: 4210
I made a goal of not spending more than $20.00 today. I spent $19.10 and purchased the following items:

ground beef
chicken wings
1 loaf of bread
1 dozen eggs
1 box of wheat thins ( I did not need to buy this but it was on sale.)
1 box of mixed vegatables
1 box of green beans

I actually looked in the cupboard and fridge to determine what I have. I never do that. My budget for 2015 is to not spend more than $80 a month on groceries. It seems totally unrealistic but I will find a way. I will leave $5 for pizza twice a month. Luckily, my employers feeds us twice a week which helps a great deal.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-14-2014, 12:19 PM
 
6,310 posts, read 7,990,836 times
Reputation: 7908
Get and use a big crockpot. You can make delicious stews and soups and all kinds of things.

I made a pot of split pea soup with some cubed ham. Added carrots, celery, onion, a bay leaf, garlic, a little salt, some pepper and cooked on low for 9 hours. Delish! About 8 nice size servings for a few bucks.

There are so many recipes out there.

I don't know if eating on $80 a month is feasible, but I would think $100 could be done if your main diet is rice, beans, legumes, a little meat, some fish, and then veggies & fruits. Tofu is another cheap source of protein and there are many ways to incorporate that into a cheap stir fry.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-14-2014, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
13,438 posts, read 15,041,010 times
Reputation: 11924
Calories per $.

I can buy steel cut oatmeal for ~80 cents a pound. A pound of oatmeal has 1,700 calories in it, so a 2,000 daily calorie intake from oatmeal is only 95 cents a day. For protein focus on vegetable sources with some meat to supplement. Rice and beans are complimentary protein sources, meaning combine the two and you have a complete protein. Rice doesn't have enough protein in it though. Still you can get some and it's similarly about 1,700 calories per pound and costs ~50-60 cents per pound. Beans cost a bit more ~$1.25/pound, only about 900 calories but lots of protein. Quinoa recently has gotten expensive but it's a great protein source. At $4/pound, however, it's too expensive to be your primary calorie/protein source. You're not going to be healthy eating that kind of a diet. You need to save on your calories and protein so you can afford vegetables. Onions, carrots, kale, broccoli, spinach, and so on. Skimp on fruit. Half a banana on your daily oatmeal, for example, maybe the odd apple or pear when you can get them cheap (<$1 lb). Avocados are great. Very calorie and nutrient dense, so they're an exception to most fruits which juts aren't that great for you and cost a lot. Whole milk and eggs are good, cheap foods. Canola oil is healthy and dirt cheap. Skip the olive oil fad. I like olive oil as much as the next guy, but I don't cook with it. I use it mostly for salad dressings and humus.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Frugal Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top