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Old 05-22-2009, 08:05 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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On a side note, we began growing horseradish last year. It can be an invasive plant, so do be careful with it. We put four rootings in a barrel and they grew. They looked small and like they did not do much. But in the fall when I flipped the barrel upside down, they had each became root bound and had filled the bottom of the barrel with coils and coils of roots. We must have pulled out 30 yards of tap roots. My Dw has dried some, ground it to a powder and has been substituting dried horseradish instead of black pepper in our meals.

It tastes great!
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Old 05-22-2009, 02:08 PM
 
1,116 posts, read 2,544,473 times
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I really don't see how $150 per person is hard.

My husband and I just did our grocery shopping for the next two weeks and spent $80. That's with chicken, premium deli meats (ham, genoa, provolone, pepperoni ), a whole fish, tofu, german sausages, organic vegetables and milk, cheeses...we really splurged this time.

Then again, we don't buy processed foods, so I guess that could cut into it. It's not really a conscious choices as much as we really just don't enjoy processed foods.
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Old 05-22-2009, 03:56 PM
 
Location: California
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I could do it if it were just me. But probably not forever because I do like to eat out sometimes.
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Old 05-23-2009, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Western North Carolina
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I have to stick to no more than $200 a month for myself and two teenagers. The only way to do this is as many have already mentioned here - you have to cook your own food and stop buying convenience food. And stop eating out. Even fast food, which used to be cheap, is not that cheap anymore - anyone else notice this? It's tiring to have to cook yourself sometimes, especially when you work full-time, but it's necessary to keep your food costs down.

We have a local salvage grocery store that I utilize and it helps tremendously. I don't care if a plastic bottle of juice is a little dented ($1.00 compared to $3.99 for the exact same thing in the regular grocery store), or a box of cereal slightly crushed ($1 - $1.50 a box, name brand cereal). The quality of the product is the same inside.

I can't imagine who is actually paying close to $5.00 for a little box of sugar filled cereal at the grocery store, or close to $4.00 for a loaf of bread!. Or even the ridiculous prices for soda, which I won't buy. Nothing but empty calories. I want the most nutrition I can get for my dollar.

Also, I don't plan meals first and then shop. I stop by the grocery store almost daily, and whatever the best bargain is, in the way of meat say, that's what we are having. I also check out the mark-down "buggies" in those stores.

Also, as others have said, use rice, pasta, and beans beans beans!! Add your OWN seasonings, they taste much better that way anyway.
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Old 05-23-2009, 09:26 PM
 
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There was an article written in Southwest airline magazine that talked about what they charge you for frozen peas in those microwave food... in all, they charged you $10,000 per pound of some of the nastiest frozen peas... that's quite a profit margin for makers of microwave food... I stopped buying these types of food because they are a rip-off... you eat one and you are still hungry... perhaps you are suppose to eat the cardboard too... I understand why they make so much money.... lazy people (college students, for example)... the best way is to cook your own food... canned food can be cheap too (like beans) as well as good for you (lowers cholesterol, high fiber) and they last forever...
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Old 05-23-2009, 09:42 PM
 
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Everyone else has said the same things I would say - buy in bulk, buy foods in their purest form, make food from scratch. On average I spend about $35 a week on groceries for two adults. Husband works at a restaurant, so sometimes eats for half price or free - that helps. When I can, I buy dry goods in bulk - 20# bags of rice, beans, etc. I bought a few bulk bags of beans exactly one year ago and have only gone through half of it - lasts quite a while, keep in airtight buckets. During the summer when my little vegetable garden is producing I spend almost nothing on produce at the grocery store. Grow things like squash and potatoes that last a long time in storage. Almost free. I never buy processed, ready to eat food in boxes or cans - total ripoff. We eat out occasionally, but so infrequently I wouldn't count it as part of my grocery bill - it's more like a once in a while treat, like a movie or a concert. Funny how the people I hear complaining about being broke are the ones who run out every day to buy a $7 styrofoam box of food for lunch. Make it yourself for half the price.
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Old 05-24-2009, 03:28 AM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
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Get as much of your groceries as well as everything else at anyplace other than a retail store if you can. There is just the two of us and we spend about $120 - $140 a month on food. Mostly dairy products since my DH won't let me have a dairy animal. Hmpf! We buy things from a co-op and get whole grains and grind them for flour for bread, buy in bulk for beans, oats, sugar, etc. We haven't had to buy meat in years. We get a lot of feral pigs and the folks with backyard pet chickens are really happy to give us roosters when they start crowing. We eat a lot of chicken and pork. The vegetable garden as well as the hydroponic lettuce keep us in greens and we get stuff from the local farmer's market, too. We do buy milk at the grocery as well as things on sale which we won't know what they are until we see the markdown stickers.
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Old 05-26-2009, 08:50 PM
 
387 posts, read 1,449,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nuala View Post
I personally could have a staple of curried rice + beans, potatoes, with some meat added now and then. Rice, grains are very cheap and folks who eat them spend like $50 a month a person. Plus, your own greens all summer long. For drinks, black tea or your own leaves tea.

However, my husband can eat only particular things (part of it his allergies, and part of it just stubborness) so he has to eat a lot of meat, and sweets. I know, not good. Kids get on his bandwagon at times, too. So we are far from being food-frugal.
Hmmm. I might have to do this being that I am working on paying off debt and selling my house. I probably can't do this for the long-term but definitely until I get where I need to be.
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Old 05-26-2009, 08:54 PM
 
387 posts, read 1,449,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spiderbear View Post
I really don't see how $150 per person is hard.

My husband and I just did our grocery shopping for the next two weeks and spent $80. That's with chicken, premium deli meats (ham, genoa, provolone, pepperoni ), a whole fish, tofu, german sausages, organic vegetables and milk, cheeses...we really splurged this time.

Then again, we don't buy processed foods, so I guess that could cut into it. It's not really a conscious choices as much as we really just don't enjoy processed foods.
Are you both getting a full serving of meat. The only way I could spend $150 a month or less would be not to eat meat with my meals. I need someone to do a meal plan for me. I don't know how to work $150
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Old 05-26-2009, 08:57 PM
 
387 posts, read 1,449,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by younglisa7 View Post
If you are talking about just food I think it can be done very easily. Here is an example of some of the foods you can eat cheap.

Breakfast-
Oatmeal with a little milk and fruit. Buy fruit on sale or buy large cans. I use powdered milk because I can make a small amount, it doesn't go bad, and for me it is cheaper.

Toast with peanut butter and jelly and fruit.

Cereal with fruit. If you but it on sale or buy generic "and" measure a real portion size it isn't that expensive.


Lunches-
Sandwich like tuna and homemade veggie soup. I make a veggie soup that I have a cup of everyday with a small sandwich. I make a big pot with cabbage, carrots, celery, diced tomatoes, rice, beans and chicken bouillon cubes. I freeze in smaller portions because I make a lot.

Peanut butter and jelly is a great cheaper lasting staple.

Grilled cheese.

In the summer I love having a big tomato sandwich.


Dinners-
Eat meat free 2-3 times a week.

Pasta with tomato sauce whether it is canned tomatoes or sauce. Whatever is on sale.

Rice and Beans.

Roast a whole chicken when it goes on sale. Buy extra and freeze. You can get 4-7 meals from one small bird. Then make soup from the frame.

Have pancakes once a week.

Have eggs for dinner.

Chili.

Bean burritos.



No eating out including pizza. If you want it make it at home. Make water your main beverage. Do not buy any processed or convenience foods unless it is an incredible deal. This may not be healthy but it could be cheaper. Like a frozen dinner for $1.00. Just don't eat too many of those.


These are just a few examples. It really can be done. Buy the foods that you use in bulk. Buy fruits, veggies, and meats on sale. Watch for and stock up on sales. Cut back on meat. Grow some of your own food or hit a Farmer's Market and learn how to can. Eat smaller portions.


Not only can it be done but I'm sure it is much healthier as long as you mix in your fruits and veggies.
I cannot stomach powdered milk. Does anyone know if regular milk can be frozen? Wonderful ideas in this post.
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