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Old 05-29-2009, 07:53 AM
 
596 posts, read 2,494,735 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atlcharm View Post
Are their certain income requirements you need to meet to buy food from Angel Food Ministries?
ATLcharm, no. The Angel Food Ministries program is a NO QUESTIONS ASKED program - they do not take any info like that. EVERYONE is welcome to make food purchases through them. The food, I have heard from 4 people I know well, is VERY good too. You can buy several boxes, and can add on "other boxes" that are more specialized such as seafood boxes, extra fruits and veggies boxes, etc etc. The only issue I have ever heard of from these people I know that buy their food from them is that one of them received a blueberry pie in her box and it leaked on the other things. All 4 received that same box that week, and the others did not have their blueberry pie leak (I guess everyone gets the same basic supply of food across the nation? I dont know, but the 4 people I'm referring to live in 3 states).

http://www.angelfoodministries.com/
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Old 05-29-2009, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Belinda_Cooperstone1 View Post
I want to use this list, to show how this would not work where I live. I think the cost of food is cheaper in the US than here in Canada. For a family of four we spend $800 a month $600 if I am being frugal, and now with oldest away it will be a little less.



I did find Nova Scotia had food items that were more then in Ontario, and some were cheaper. So maybe it depends across Canada. But I still think it is cheaper in the US. I know the dollar is different, but I think it balances out with cost of living and earning etc... if you converted it. I may be wrong on that. I am always trying to find ways to cut down our food bill, but with these prices it is hard.

Obviously my list is not applicable in Canada, or any other country outside the US. I cannot speak for food prices there, and even in the US, it will probably vary regionally, as California, the New York metro area, Hawaii, and Alaska all tend to have higher food prices.

Last edited by Randomdude; 05-29-2009 at 10:41 AM..
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Old 05-29-2009, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by supernerdgirl View Post
cutting out meat does wonders, buying fresh stuff, and i know some very small but cheap grocery stores and DO NOT shop at the chains at all (except for target for some staples, because they're ridiculously cheap with food).

I can do it for about $150 a month and I do eat out on occasion too. Chicago is expensive, but not on cooking if you find the right stores.

Target really? In my experience, Target is one of the absolute most expensive places you can buy food. I would pick any local grocery store, including Kroger, Walmart, or Kmart over them.
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Old 05-29-2009, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Oregon
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I think $150 per month per person is no problem. We have a family of four, and I spend $500 to $600 per month on groceries. This includes household supplies (tp, cleaners, etc.) and even a few little splurges - maybe a DVD the family has been wanting, or something for the kids.

I shop at Costco and WalMart. I am reasonable about what I buy, but never feel like I am doing without. We are in Oregon, which I think is about average as far as food prices go.
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Old 05-29-2009, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Penobscot Bay, the best place in Maine!
1,891 posts, read 5,147,714 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by atlcharm View Post
I cannot stomach powdered milk. Does anyone know if regular milk can be frozen? Wonderful ideas in this post.
Yes, it can, though you may want to open it and pour a little of it out before freezing, as it can expand in the container when it freezes and make a mess when you thaw it out. I used to teach nutrition/basic cooking skills, and often told my clients to buy the regular milk for drinking, but think about using the powdered milk in recipes instead of regular milk (as you are much less likely to notice any difference in taste).
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Old 05-29-2009, 06:51 PM
 
Location: Some place very cold
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I posted this in the thread I just started, but I'm going to repost it here. It's got lots of good recipes for inexpensive meals.

Just need to plan ahead and be imaginative.


Cook for Good Free Recipes for Low-Cost, Delicious Meals


# # #
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Old 05-29-2009, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Nova Scotia
458 posts, read 1,136,602 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randomdude View Post
Obviously my list is not applicable in Canada, or any other country outside the US. I cannot speak for food prices there, and even in the US, it will probably vary regionally, as California, the New York metro area, Hawaii, and Alaska all tend to have higher food prices.
Yes I agree, but I have noticed on other sights that food seems to be cheaper in the US, a lot of our food comes from the US so we have freight costs etc.
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Old 05-29-2009, 07:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Randomdude View Post
Target really? In my experience, Target is one of the absolute most expensive places you can buy food. I would pick any local grocery store, including Kroger, Walmart, or Kmart over them.
loaf of bread $1.29
canned veggies and beans $0.89
canned broth $0.77
Silk $2.99 (cheapest anywhere, even better when you can get the two packs for $4.99)
pasta for like a buck
pasta sauce for $2

this is just off the top of my head/ what i noticed when I was there tonight...

my target pretty much has almost anything I could need, except for enough fresh produce.
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Old 05-29-2009, 07:54 PM
'M'
 
Location: Glendale Country Club
1,770 posts, read 2,503,937 times
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Default Be a food market detective

Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post
This was a side topic from another thread. I have a friend who is a single woman that claims she lives on a $150/month food budget. Some people thought this was doable, but I couldn't see how.

So... this seems like a good topic for a thread. How do you guys do it? I'm open to the idea but I can't quite grasp how you eat three nutritious meals a day on $5 a day. Please give as many specifics as possible, and remember I'm talking about living on a budget like that all year long (this person is not fasting or trying to lose weight). A grocery list would be great.
I learned something new by observing the habits of someone who prepared food for a seminar...she shops at some of the Mexican markets, like Mariano's, in Las Vegas....once bought a 20 # bag of oranges for $2.00. Avocadoes sometimes are way cheap, but not always.

It pays to acquaint yourself with the different kinds of markets in your area...ethnic markets, coops, etc. In my area, Estes Park Co, the Farmer's Market far under prices the supermarket. Last summer, we also noticed that the Palisade, Colorado peaches were MUCH less in the grocery store and were just as delicious, but smaller size...they went down to 99 cents/lb compared to MUCH more at the fruit stands.

Also, in Colorado, Vitamin Cottage can have exceptional buys on organic produce..it pays to stop in and see what they have at any given time. it also pays to check out Walmart.
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Old 05-29-2009, 08:05 PM
 
Location: USA
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$150 is almost our budget, we spend $200 a month including hamburger and chicken. The trick is to find produce cheap. Either at a farmers market when stuff is on sale or at a value store. We can buy a bag of potatoes or onions for a dollar. Bell peppers and romaine lettuce for a buck. If i was into stackable farming i wouldn't have to buy produce ever again.
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