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Old 06-02-2009, 05:56 AM
 
Location: Rockland County New York
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Quote:
Originally Posted by user_id View Post
Huh? What are they having two meals? Combos at McDonalds cost between $5~$7 that includes New York. The combos for $5 are plenty of food. Order from the dollar menu and its even cheaper.
What are you talking about? A meat at the golden arches cost about $7 dollars with out tax. You must be living in the 80's. By the way do you own stock in any fast food restaurants?
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Old 06-02-2009, 06:09 AM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stac2007 View Post
What are you talking about? A meat at the golden arches cost about $7 dollars with out tax. You must be living in the 80's. By the way do you own stock in any fast food restaurants?
Only the deluxe combos are that expensive. The say BigMac combo is around $5. Regardless, 5 x $7 = $35 and that is assuming they are all adults. The kids meals are a few bucks.

Anyhow, I spend $2 on a meal at McDonalds. Value fries, chicken sandwich or "Mcdouble" and a water. Now the food is not particularly healthy, but its hard to beat that at home.

I don't currently own any stocks.
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Old 06-02-2009, 06:27 AM
 
Location: On the Ohio River in Western, KY
3,388 posts, read 5,542,188 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stac2007 View Post
What are you talking about? A meat at the golden arches cost about $7 dollars with out tax. You must be living in the 80's. By the way do you own stock in any fast food restaurants?
They are less than that here.

I think a Big Mac meal is around $4.50; and you can get a coke, fries, and a sandwich off the $1 menu for $3.18 total.
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Old 06-02-2009, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Florida
18,290 posts, read 18,533,242 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by user_id View Post
Only the deluxe combos are that expensive. The say BigMac combo is around $5. Regardless, 5 x $7 = $35 and that is assuming they are all adults. The kids meals are a few bucks.

Anyhow, I spend $2 on a meal at McDonalds. Value fries, chicken sandwich or "Mcdouble" and a water. Now the food is not particularly healthy, but its hard to beat that at home.

I don't currently own any stocks.
That is one of the main points for most of us.
Value for the money.
Hell...for convenience alone, just eat your old newspapers...cheaper, quicker and probably just as healthy
Use a lot of salt and you may not even notice the difference
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Old 06-02-2009, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,722 posts, read 47,483,706 times
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We have sourdough bread starter [that I made] and can make a loaf of bread every other day. I do not think that we spend $1/week for that bread. Maybe if you include cooking fuel, it may be $1/week.

Right now I have a large crock-pot filled with chili. A pound of ground meat, a pound of brown beans, a pound of white beans, a quart of puree' tomatoes, some garlic, some chili powder, and a dollap of molasses. It is cheap and easy to make.

This week I am home alone. I dish up some chili each day, and I add a little more ingredients after each meal [to keep the pot full].

It is good, it is healthy food, and it is cheap.
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Old 06-02-2009, 02:36 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
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Originally Posted by nuala View Post
Does she still like "salo" (fat)?

I can't stand the processed food myself (being Russian) , especially the endless snacking, - and yes, I usually cook large pots of whatever (usually soup)
Irena is not much of a salo eater (praise God) - I have adopted much of the Russian/Ukrainian culture, but even I have limits..

A young lady who interned with our firm invited me over to her parent's flat, her mom made up fried chicken which was excellent, but Anya preferred salo to the chicken - the image of her daintily eating that stuff in strong preference to the chicken still stays with me.
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Old 06-02-2009, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
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Quote:
Originally Posted by user_id View Post
If someone does not enjoy cooking then the real question is how much their free time is worth. The cost difference is often not great enough and you can get "real food" by eating out and buying prepared food.
It seems to me if you don't like cooking, you are doing it wrong. You don't need an elaborate kitchen full of gadgets, although for me a working dishwasher is a must to be able to enjoy cooking, I simply don't like to hand-wash dishes. You simply have to have an idea of what you want to make, or just look in the fridge and cupboard for what you have at hand, and then have some idea how to get from the raw ingredients to the dish you have in mind. Once you understand what you are doing at even a rudimentary level, you should be able to prepare at least simple dishes exactly as *you* want them prepared. I like my own fried shrimp, omlettes, steaks, etc. (guy food if you will) better than what I can get at even a higher-end restaurant - simply because I know what I want, and I know how to get to it.

But of course I take your point, if you have a high enough income, it makes more sense to hire a personal chef or eat out.

Some people don't have a very sensitive palate, that's a pity, but of course just as some people are born with poor eyesight or hearing that can't be helped much, some have a weak sense of taste. I can only suggest to these people that they need to watch what they eat for nutritional reasons, unfortunately it will be more of a chore than an enjoyment for them, but like a blind man crossing a street, they will have to pay attention if they intend to survive.
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Old 06-02-2009, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,476 posts, read 16,969,159 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by old_cold View Post
That is one of the main points for most of us.
Value for the money.
Hell...for convenience alone, just eat your old newspapers...cheaper, quicker and probably just as healthy
Use a lot of salt and you may not even notice the difference
Except of course that the newspaper is not food. Health wise the main issue is the fat content, but I'm not particularly concerned with it. I eat much fattier foods at home all the time.

In terms of the quality of the ingredients I don't think most of the food people make at home is superior. Its just bread, meat and potatoes.
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Old 06-02-2009, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,476 posts, read 16,969,159 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
It seems to me if you don't like cooking, you are doing it wrong. You don't need an elaborate kitchen full of gadgets, although for me a working dishwasher is a must to be able to enjoy cooking, I simply don't like to hand-wash dishes.
Personally, I like cooking to a degree. But not everyone enjoys it and its not because they are "doing it wrong".

But I'm more so interested in the "culinary arts", rather than "cooking". So its more so a hobby than something I do to save money (Often, I'm in fact not saving money).

But regardless, a lot of people don't like cooking.
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Old 06-02-2009, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
54 posts, read 128,481 times
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Once you learn to cook some simple recipes, you can cut your "time spent" down to almost the equivalent of the time it took you to go to McDonald's, stand in line, pay and get back home.

If you start from the point of not owning any cooking utensils, having no knowledge and not knowing how to plan out a menu of relatively simple dishes then the ramp up looks daunting. Over time, I can't see how McDonald's can compete (for most people) with preparing your own food when calculating all the variables (time, etc).

Nothing stops you from eating out part time and eating in the rest.
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