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Old 01-22-2012, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,574,557 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wheaties View Post
Are you sure? My rice cooker has a start timer.
You can buy, even if frugal, a plug-through timer, that you can set to start any appliance. Even a vacuum cleaner.
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Old 01-22-2012, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,818 posts, read 39,375,570 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
My supermarket has 3-pound bags of "soup veggies", which cost $4.99. In the bag, there is potato, cabbage, carrots, celery. None, bought separately, cost over 65c a pound, but putting a little in each bag, they have literally tripled the price of the veggies. And people buy them.

Don't even get me started on Lunchables.
All the veggies that they package together in my grocery store (pre-mixed "stir fry medley," pre-mixed "fajita medley," etc.) is so much more expensive than just buying the veggies separate and doing the prepwork yourself. Maybe it's just me, but it takes me minimal time to dice up some peppers, squash, onions. It's really not such a cumbersome effort that it's worth dollars extra for somebody else to do the dicing. Others must put a different premium on their time than I do. I could see it if it were hours of prep involved that you were saving on. But it's not.

On the opposite end of that spectrum is rotisserie chicken. I can buy an already-roasted chicken for exactly the same price as the raw roaster. On a work night, it's a no-brainer, although I like roasting my own chicken on the weekend.
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Old 01-22-2012, 10:49 AM
 
Location: San Diego
32,801 posts, read 30,052,880 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gardener34 View Post
Agreed that the smaller and smaller corporate packaging people are likely going to start waking up to the benefits of making it yourself - so much more for the money. Also, you can dictate what goes into the food - not a bunch of chemicals and preservatives!

Would like to hear from people in whose families both spouses work outside your house full time and have kids. (you know the deal: lessons, homework, etc, etc.) Then making it yourself from scratch becomes a real challenge. additionally: we have NO auxiliary freezer, house too small... I try to stock up as much as I can.
we make menus each Sunday. That way it's easy for even the kids to put their lunches together. We also smoke meats on Sat or Sun and it's enough for the week. It's not really that challenging. When I had an apt I kept the freezer in a closet or outside with a lock on it.
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Old 01-22-2012, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Middle America
35,818 posts, read 39,375,570 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gardener34 View Post
The problem I am having with my crock pot, is that I am gone for 10 full hours. There is not a way to start the crockpot up AFTER I have left, 10 hours seems to be too long to cook something. Everything I cook in it (except for weekends when I can monitor and have the stuff in there for only 6-8) tastes burnt.
My crock pot doesn't have a delay start timer, either, and I am routinely gone upwards of 10 hours...so I invested in a plug adapter with a timer.

Making enough for leftovers that can be quickly repurposed is key for me, too.

When I get home really late, and we don't want to eat out or spend a lot of time, our big go-to is omelets.
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Old 01-22-2012, 10:59 AM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,120 posts, read 9,418,782 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
All the veggies that they package together in my grocery store (pre-mixed "stir fry medley," pre-mixed "fajita medley," etc.) is so much more expensive than just buying the veggies separate and doing the prepwork yourself. Maybe it's just me, but it takes me minimal time to dice up some peppers, squash, onions. It's really not such a cumbersome effort that it's worth dollars extra for somebody else to do the dicing. Others must put a different premium on their time than I do. I could see it if it were hours of prep involved that you were saving on. But it's not.

On the opposite end of that spectrum is rotisserie chicken. I can buy an already-roasted chicken for exactly the same price as the raw roaster. On a work night, it's a no-brainer, although I like roasting my own chicken on the weekend.
I sure agree with you...I'd rather chop myself than buy the already chopped at the higher price...sometimes I'll chop enough for several meals at once--for example, chop up onions, garlic, squash and green pepper for a spaghetti sauce, and chop extra for a chili I'll be making a few nights later. There's a certain zen to chopping that I can get into if in the right mood...chop, chop, chop and meditate on the rich goodness and love I'm putting into the dishes I'm preparing...
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Old 01-22-2012, 01:08 PM
 
3,720 posts, read 4,440,768 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1brokegirl View Post
I sometimes get home from work at 6:30. There is no way I am going to go cook a chicken when I walk in the door. Cooking from scratch may be fine for soccer moms or people who work from home or work-part time, but for most working people, we don't have the time.
I just cooked a thinly sliced chicken breast in under 20 minutes, and that included rinsing it, seasoning it, and breading (flour) it. But I did cheat and bought a bag of frozen rice and veggies which I don't consider a big deal. It was quicker than cooking the rice on the stove top (hey, I'm hungry!).
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Old 01-22-2012, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,476 posts, read 16,974,551 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1brokegirl View Post
I sometimes get home from work at 6:30. There is no way I am going to go cook a chicken when I walk in the door. Cooking from scratch may be fine for soccer moms or people who work from home or work-part time, but for most working people, we don't have the time.
So don't cook a chicken, cook something else. Cooking "from scratch" doesn't need to take long.....

Anyhow....nothing good comes out of a crock pot...
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Old 01-22-2012, 05:44 PM
 
43,012 posts, read 89,000,336 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gardener34 View Post
Would like to hear from people in whose families both spouses work outside your house full time and have kids. (you know the deal: lessons, homework, etc, etc.) Then making it yourself from scratch becomes a real challenge. additionally: we have NO auxiliary freezer, house too small... I try to stock up as much as I can.
Not really. A dinner consisting of whole foods doesn't have to be a fancy complicated meal. It can be a meat, vegie, and a grain/potatoe. It doesn't take more time to cook a meat or cook a side of vegetables. Fresh fruit as a side is super healthy and easier than cooking. And salads are easy. It's not that hard when you think about it.
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Old 01-22-2012, 05:49 PM
 
43,012 posts, read 89,000,336 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1brokegirl View Post
I sometimes get home from work at 6:30. There is no way I am going to go cook a chicken when I walk in the door. Cooking from scratch may be fine for soccer moms or people who work from home or work-part time, but for most working people, we don't have the time.
What's hard about cooking a chicken? You plop it into the oven, set the timer, and walk away. There's nothing from scratch about it.

Alternately, you can grill thinly sliced chicken breats in mere minutes. Just pull them out, sprinkle seasoning on them, and toss them on the grill. They are done in just 5 minutes.
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Old 01-22-2012, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,574,557 times
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A pressure cooker is also an excellent investment. Almost anything can be cooked in less than about 40 minutes. Buy the cheapest meat and veggies you can find, throw them all in there, take care of other household chores or just relax for 30-45 minutes, and serve. Make enough to serve 6 or 8 and warm up the leftovers tomorrow.
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