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Old 09-22-2009, 06:01 PM
 
Location: where the moss is taking over the villages
2,178 posts, read 4,725,054 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjohnson4381 View Post
In another thread, several people mentioned that they spend $150 or less per person on groceries. I don't understand. I'm making my weekly grocery list and I can't get it below $39 (for just one person). And it was a little bit painful to get it down to there. I'm including non-food items like shampoo and aspirin in that.

I guess I could get it lower if I ate Ramen noodles or pinto beans every day. Is that what you guys do? I want to have a somewhat small grocery bill and also eat healthy foods. Is that possible?
try watering down your soaps/shampoos & hair rinse. it really goes farther. my family thinks it's a drag, but i see positive results. the foaming dispensers are great to reuse if you can get the ratio down for soap/water: stretches the soap a lot.

don't bother buying antibacterial unless there's a problem in the house with being susceptible to germs... antibacterial soaps dry/strip the skin & lead to using moisturizers to replace lost oils... itching results from the stripping of normal bacteria (makes fungus grow - itchy!)

try using water like in the old days & really dole it out. try to self restrict.

a mattress warmer can keep you warmer in cold weather when you may want to keep the thermostat low. we have a huge problem with heating costs where we are.

maybe hook up certain electrical things to a surge protector outlet power strip & turn it all of when the things aren't in use?

when shopping for food, i look for protein value. any canned soups or frozen food needs to have a value of at least 15 grams per serving. 20-30 is ideal. for cereal, more carbs means wasted calories... at least 5 grams per serving is valuable to me. i've taught my boyfriend to look for this information. walmart is the price leader for soaps/frozen food/canned food, in my opinion.

the dishwasher uses up mega energy at our house so all is washed by hand now & that has led to significant savings.
reducing the dishes/flatware to the minimum helps to keep the inevitable clutter of dishware in the sink too... maybe do it like you're camping!

kae

Last edited by sarahkate_m; 09-22-2009 at 06:18 PM.. Reason: protien
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Old 09-23-2009, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Denver
682 posts, read 1,832,277 times
Reputation: 337
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahkate_m View Post
try watering down your soaps/shampoos & hair rinse. it really goes farther. my family thinks it's a drag, but i see positive results. the foaming dispensers are great to reuse if you can get the ratio down for soap/water: stretches the soap a lot.

don't bother buying antibacterial unless there's a problem in the house with being susceptible to germs... antibacterial soaps dry/strip the skin & lead to using moisturizers to replace lost oils... itching results from the stripping of normal bacteria (makes fungus grow - itchy!)

try using water like in the old days & really dole it out. try to self restrict.

a mattress warmer can keep you warmer in cold weather when you may want to keep the thermostat low. we have a huge problem with heating costs where we are.

maybe hook up certain electrical things to a surge protector outlet power strip & turn it all of when the things aren't in use?

when shopping for food, i look for protein value. any canned soups or frozen food needs to have a value of at least 15 grams per serving. 20-30 is ideal. for cereal, more carbs means wasted calories... at least 5 grams per serving is valuable to me. i've taught my boyfriend to look for this information. walmart is the price leader for soaps/frozen food/canned food, in my opinion.

the dishwasher uses up mega energy at our house so all is washed by hand now & that has led to significant savings.
reducing the dishes/flatware to the minimum helps to keep the inevitable clutter of dishware in the sink too... maybe do it like you're camping!

kae

Good ideas. I especially like your suggestions about looking for meals with protein. I know that while protein fills you up, sometimes I can eat a ton of low-protein cereal, or crackers, or chips and still not feel satisfied.

I've noticed the same thing with meat. I've been cooking more and more vegetarian meals and I've noticed that, not only are they lower in calories, but often they're cheaper. It's crazy, too, while I was growing up I thought every meal had to have meat in it, but you can do a lot with beans and vegetables and cheese and that sort of thing.
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Old 02-23-2010, 10:22 PM
 
4,135 posts, read 9,150,981 times
Reputation: 2677
Quote:
Originally Posted by sskkc View Post
You want to AVERAGE $39/wk... but some weeks, you'll probably spend more, some less.

Each week (sometimes I go two weeks), I plan out a menu. I write out 7 dinner menus, and I ask the kids and dh for lunch/breakfast wants. Then I go through coupons, newspaper and online and check the "loss leaders" at the major grocery chains. I look through my pantry to see what bargain ingredients I've still got stocked and then I make my list. It's almost never the same twice.

I try to always have $10-20 set aside for major bargains. For instance, when 1/2 gal ice cream goes on sale at Walmart for 99 cents. I can pick up 10 and the kids get to have their friends over for a special sundae snack once that week, and we have dessert for weeks, without me having to prep anything.

I've caught tomato sauce, dented cans, for 15 cents each, Mini Raviolis (name brand) for 40 cents a can (we all love it, but only the name brand stuff), cereal for 14 cents/box (big boxes of the name brand stuff - usually a holiday promo box), blocks of cheddar cheese for 50 cents/lb (because their frig was on the blink and repairman couldn't make it til the next day), 90% lean ground beef for 29 cents/lb (same day), etc.
Dented or swollen cans are NOT a bargain. Esp. swollen cans -- they can be swelling due to age or problems in processing. Wait for a sale. Food poisoning is not worth it. If you do get a can dented on the way home, use it first. Same with same day meat: immediately cook it and freeze it.

If you can, you'd be better making spaghetti sauce in the summer and freezing it -- from fresh tomatoes.(We grow ours, as well as many other veggies, and I blanch and freeze the veggijes and make sauce., I have quit the canning; we run a generator when power is out to keep the freezer cold.
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