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Old 07-20-2009, 03:29 PM
 
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Hello. Just following the wonderful grocery thread, and someone mentioned using a bread machine. Never used one, never thought about it. We eat whole wheat bread that averages about $2.50 per loaf. Is the cost savings using a bread machine worth buying one? I don't even know how much a machine would cost!! Guess I'll look it up now. Always seemed like it would be pretty involved, making the bread that is.
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Old 07-20-2009, 03:46 PM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
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Look up some of the "no knead" recipes which are so popular. Makes just as good a loaf as a bread machine (even better crust if you use the cast iron pot and high temp method).

Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day is the book (which is a slightly misleading title, because it involves more than 5 minutes with rising), plus they've got a new whole grains book coming out. Jim Leahy, of Sullivan Street Bakery fame, the guy who had the most recent recipe in the NYT food section that kicked off the current no knead craze, also has a book coming out.
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Old 07-20-2009, 04:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW-type-gal View Post
Look up some of the "no knead" recipes which are so popular. Makes just as good a loaf as a bread machine (even better crust if you use the cast iron pot and high temp method).

Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day is the book (which is a slightly misleading title, because it involves more than 5 minutes with rising), plus they've got a new whole grains book coming out. Jim Leahy, of Sullivan Street Bakery fame, the guy who had the most recent recipe in the NYT food section that kicked off the current no knead craze, also has a book coming out.
Thanks so much. I will look this up!
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Old 07-20-2009, 05:57 PM
 
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The beauty of the bread machine is that you dump it all in together, turn it on, and leave.

You don't need to use a mixing bowl, pan, etc. You do'nt need to hang around waiting for the bread to rise, nor do you need to wait for it to finish baking so you can take it out of the oven.

I son't make a ton of bread because in all honesty I really limit my carbs, and my husband prefers his PB&J on Wonder, but if we were big bread eaters I'd be using it daily.
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Old 07-20-2009, 06:01 PM
 
Location: NE Florida
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Love bread machines. I once had some sourdough starter given to me by a friend and made bread regularly. I got away from it once I moved, but need to do so again. Nothing takes the place of fresh bread and it is ridiculously easy with a bread maker.
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Old 07-20-2009, 08:50 PM
 
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Any recs on what type, brand, features? Ok, just finished reading some old threads, and I have some brands to start checking out.
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Old 07-21-2009, 10:38 AM
 
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King Arthur Flour recommends the Zo Zojirushi Home Bakery Supreme Bread Machine

What I like about this machine is that you get real looking loaves of bread and not long thin tubes of bread. I would think the toss it in and let the machine make and bake it is pretty nice, too.

Honestly, I don't use a bread machine. I use my lovely ice blue Kitchen Aid stand mixer to make and knead the dough. Rise once in the bowl, knock it down and rise for the second time in the greased pan and bake.

I also only use the King Arthur white whole wheat flour. It's exactly like regular whole wheat flour, but lighter in color and taste. I also toss in 1/2 cup of their harvest grains blends Harvest Grains Blend - 2 lb.
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Old 07-21-2009, 11:14 AM
 
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It also depends on your family's size and taste preferences.

In our family of four, none of us like the hard crusted breads that the breadmaker makes for sandwiches.

We typically want homemade bread once a month, maybe a bit more in winter. But I found that when we want the homemade bread, we want it fresh and we go through at least a loaf, sometimes more (like for fondue or to go along with stew). So, I ended up making it by hand anyway. By hand, I can make several loaves, rather than one at a time.

I used the machine about once a month at first, then a couple times a year. After it sat unused for year or two, I finally got rid of it. (I had it about 6 years total)

My MIL showed me how to use the dough hook on my Kitchenaid mixer (something I never had tried before)...it's even easier now to make bread from scratch, and cheaper too.
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Old 07-22-2009, 09:25 AM
 
Location: friendswood texas
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I have stopped buying bread from the store entirely now. Unfortunately my bread machine just quit, so now I am making bread by hand. Ugh. (I didn't bake in the machine, just used it to rise my dough)

We were going through at least 6 loaves of store bought bread a week. That's almost 50 dollars a month on bread alone.

Bread flour runs anywhere from 2 to 5 dollars a five pound bag. They do sell it in bulk for 7 to 9 dollars for a 25 pd bag.

Making your own bread is definitely better for you and cheaper. At least for me.
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Old 07-22-2009, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
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I have a Zojirushi, don't remember the model, but it's lasted about 7 years now, still works great. I don't make bread as often as in the past, especially now that many stores carry their own brand of whole grain breads. Once my kids grow up and eat more, then I'll have to start again.
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