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Old 07-22-2009, 06:28 PM
 
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Ok, don't jump on the title of this post.

I'm just wondering what percent of net income people think is appropriate for spending on clothes (this includes underwear, socks, tops, etc.. basically anything that you can wear)

I've been on a shopping binge the last few months and have spent more than my average. I'm on a 5% pace this year.
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Old 07-22-2009, 06:40 PM
 
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I think it depends on what your income is.

Five years ago I was making double what I am now and we were spending 10% of our combined income on clothes for the two of us. But I hated my job and left for a job that pays half as much. That required making sacrifices, and one of the first things to get cut was the clothing budget. We still have a good income, but these days I'd say I spend closer to 2% a year on clothes for my husband and myself.
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Old 07-24-2009, 05:00 PM
 
Location: Denver
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I think it also may depend on your job. My dad is a contractor who builds houses all day long. He buys five t-shirts, five flannel shirts and five pairs of jeans and he's good for three years or so. I work in an office building and would probably get lots of dirty looks if I wore worn-out clothes to work every day.

Name brand or designer clothing, though, is never necessary. If someone looks down on you because you're not wearing clothes hot off the runway, then that person is stupid. And I'll never understand why some people spend hundreds of dollars on a single bag or single pair of shoes.
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Old 07-25-2009, 08:53 AM
 
Location: North Adams, MA
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I think that it depends on whether you are buying for a family, or one person, and where you work and what the expectations are. I like the idea - for men mostly though I suppose a woman could get away with it - of more or less the same outfit every day with minor variations.

One would have to have a certain amount of resolve and confidence to pull this off in a society which places more value on style than substance.
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Old 07-25-2009, 01:03 PM
 
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That is true, my husband and I at the time were both working at jobs at a major Fortune 100 corporation that required business attire, and yes, there is a difference between a cheap suit from Target and a well tailored suit from Brooks Brothers, and yes, part of your growth in the organization was based on how you dressed the part.

Now he wears business casual and I wear business casual or jeans depending on my mood and what's clean, so the clothing budget was able to be slashed. But after I changed jobs even if we were still both wearing business attire, we'd be spending less on it.
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Old 07-25-2009, 08:38 PM
 
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Many Fortune 500 firms are switching away from the suit and tie routine throughout the organization, even some of the most traditional companies. At times, it is more difficult to determine what is appropriate "business casual" and what is not.

In the "formal environment" where everyone wears the $100 100% cotton shirts, by noon most days, half od the guys looked like they have slept in the shirts despite having them professionally laundered.
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Old 07-26-2009, 07:18 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
Many Fortune 500 firms are switching away from the suit and tie routine throughout the organization, even some of the most traditional companies. At times, it is more difficult to determine what is appropriate "business casual" and what is not.

In the "formal environment" where everyone wears the $100 100% cotton shirts, by noon most days, half od the guys looked like they have slept in the shirts despite having them professionally laundered.
We both worked for extremely conservative, traditional companies. He's still there, and business casual had to be spelled out in a memo because some people were really abusing it. For men it's chino's or dress slacks with a collared polo or buttondown shirt. In the winter a turtleneck can be substituted for a collared shirt. A sport jacket is optional, and shoes must be closed toe.

For women, chinos, casual slacks, or a casual (non-denim) skirt or dress. No tank tops, no halters, no cami tops. (I would imagine that if you wore a tank/cami with a bra under it and a jacket over it, no one would care.) No capris. Dressy sandals or open toed shoes are OK, no flip flops.

For all, no sneakers, no jeans, no t-shirts, and they prefer no "logo'ed" clothing. (The Tommy flag or Ralph polo pony is fine, they mean they would prefer people not wear clothing with logo's of their country club, bowling league, vacation resort, etc.)

My husband knows of two people who were sent home to change for violating the dress code, so they mean business.
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Old 07-26-2009, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Denver
682 posts, read 1,828,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annerk View Post
We both worked for extremely conservative, traditional companies. He's still there, and business casual had to be spelled out in a memo because some people were really abusing it. For men it's chino's or dress slacks with a collared polo or buttondown shirt. In the winter a turtleneck can be substituted for a collared shirt. A sport jacket is optional, and shoes must be closed toe.

For women, chinos, casual slacks, or a casual (non-denim) skirt or dress. No tank tops, no halters, no cami tops. (I would imagine that if you wore a tank/cami with a bra under it and a jacket over it, no one would care.) No capris. Dressy sandals or open toed shoes are OK, no flip flops.

For all, no sneakers, no jeans, no t-shirts, and they prefer no "logo'ed" clothing. (The Tommy flag or Ralph polo pony is fine, they mean they would prefer people not wear clothing with logo's of their country club, bowling league, vacation resort, etc.)

My husband knows of two people who were sent home to change for violating the dress code, so they mean business.
HR just recently sent out the dress code memo at my work. Then, we got a follow-up email from the CEO two days later. When I saw the part that said "no tank tops", I felt bad. But then I figured I was okay, because I don't wear them by themselves, just under a normal, non-risque shirt. So, I doubt anyone even notices whether they have sleeves or not. And, yeah, I always wear a bra. Do some people actually think bras are optional at work? Or anywhere public, for that matter? Yuck.

I'm convinced that the memo was addressed to the people wearing flip-flops, t-shirts, tight pants, jean jackets/skirts and maybe even the girls who put their cleavage on display. Eek...where do these people come from?
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Old 07-26-2009, 10:05 PM
 
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I look forward to hearing how much people budget for clothes, thanks for starting this thread! Since January, we have budgeted $20/month total for clothing (to clothe a family of two adults and two toddlers). It worked fine until the kids started growing out of their shoes this month, and I decided that $20 a month to clothe all of us is unrealistic when shoes are involved. With $20 a month we were keeping clothes on the kids, but nothing much for ourselves. DH and my clothes aren't as big of a deal to us as we don't grow out of them and they last years and years. I'm going to start upping the budget to $40 a month and see how that works out.
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Old 07-31-2009, 04:52 AM
 
Location: Conejo Valley, CA
12,476 posts, read 16,976,529 times
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I spend around $250/year on clothes.
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