U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Frugal Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-30-2009, 07:33 AM
 
Location: In America's Heartland
929 posts, read 1,823,735 times
Reputation: 1173

Advertisements

It's all about what it is worth to you. I have a price in my mind of what an item is worth to me. If they won't meet that price, I'll live without it. I agree with fashion clothes, not even sure what is in fashion, but I can tell you I would not pay the price.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-30-2009, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Marietta, GA
7,844 posts, read 14,516,197 times
Reputation: 3484
Quote:
Originally Posted by debtmonger View Post
It's all about what it is worth to you. I have a price in my mind of what an item is worth to me.
It's also about your financial circumstances and your quality of life. Not wasting money and being "frugal" is one thing, and I have always lived my life in that way. However, I don't believe that acting like you're poor and depriving yourself of comfort and quality of life is healthy, just so you can say you're "frugal."

One case in point comes from my childhood. I was born in 1965 and my parents were children of the depression. My parents knew some people whose children were my peers, and they lived as if they were poor. Hand-me-down clothes were the rule for them, their house looked like a Salvation Army store, and they acted and lived as if the depression was still underway. Many years later, I found out that when these people died, they had saved or invested hundreds of thousands of dollars (if I remember it was close to a million) over the many years.

Now I'm all for savings, and have 2 years of expenses on hand in cash with retirement funds, but I also don't neglect the life I'm now living. I just cannot understand people who live the one and only life they have as if they're a pauper and die with a ton of cash in the bank and in investments.

Have some fun...splurge once in a while. Buy yourself and your kids nice things and enjoy them. Just because some people go overboard and spend recklessly doesn't mean it's any more correct to hoard your money and act as if you're one step from poverty. Just my $0.02.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-30-2009, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Ocean Shores, WA
5,082 posts, read 12,579,535 times
Reputation: 10543
Quote:
Originally Posted by RHB View Post

...When I can get white bread for $1 a loaf but the grain breads are $2.50 a loaf...well that's spending big...
Well, then I guess I have always been a big spender.
My wife must be a gigantic spender, she will spend five dollars for a loaf of French or Sourdough.

The last time I ate white bread was when I took jelly sandwiches to school.
It was called "Wonder Bread" and the package had red, yellow, and blue balloons on it.
It was supposed to make kids strong and healthy.
The sandwiches always tasted like waxed paper because zip lock baggies hadn't been invented.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-30-2009, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
7,091 posts, read 10,487,344 times
Reputation: 4104
I can never understanding eating those little white breads, they taste like dried library paste...and often end up doing the same when I eat it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-30-2009, 05:37 PM
RHB
 
1,096 posts, read 1,830,969 times
Reputation: 945
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fat Freddy View Post
The last time I ate white bread was when I took jelly sandwiches to school.
It was called "Wonder Bread" and the package had red, yellow, and blue balloons on it.
It was supposed to make kids strong and healthy.
The sandwiches always tasted like waxed paper because zip lock baggies hadn't been invented.

I remember those days
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-31-2009, 05:09 AM
 
Location: NY,NY
2,899 posts, read 8,304,910 times
Reputation: 2021
Wow, not sure how I stumbled into this thread, but its interesting.

Quite apparent that most, if not all of you, are not from New York or its environs.

The OP appears to be from the Philippines, which I find makes her question curious, given that people are living on the streets and even starving in her country.

Anyway, if we're talking the grocery store, then I guess my GF and I spend big. For the most part we buy organic save a few things we choose not to give up; and we shop at Whole Foods, often referred to as "Whole Paycheck". We find the quality of the foods to be worth the cost, and once you go organic you can never go back!! We try to buy non-food items elsewhere more cheaply. Eventually though, I suspect, we'll become a totally organic and environment friendly household. Already about 70-75% there.

We started out just buying mostly meats, then gradually into everything else. Recently, we finally moved to organic toilet paper.

In my experience, people often think they're being frugal when they are not. Quality and value s/b one's guiding principal when spending one's greenbacks. Quality costs, but quality lasts, and it is the "over time" thing where the value lies.

Food is the only thing where quality counts, but doesn't last!
Then again, its your well-being which lasts.

BTW, just because something is cheap, doesn't mean its a better deal (or is good for you). $1 for a loaf of bread vs. $2 and change, may appear like an obvious frugality, but---what are you getting for that dollar and what for $2 plus?

That $1 loaf is most likely, chock full of all sorts of chemicals to make its cost cheap and most profitable to the baking company. While the $2 plus bread should be made with few if any chemicals, and higher quality ingredients overall. It may certainly be a case of you get what you pay for. I'd also make a good bet that the $2 plus bread has a greater nutritional value (not from added chemicals or vitamins).

So, really, where is the value, if eating for nutrition and health---which is the purpose of food to begin with.

Of course, in trying to feed a family on a limited budget, one does what one can, perfectly understandable.

Unfortunately, the trend, in America, particularly in the urban centers, food is becoming a matter of class. With the higher socio-economic classes affording and eating more healthy foods, while the lower socio-economic classes eating less healthy foods, because its more affordable. Food is fast becoming a matter of income and education. Not good!

Oh, and I think spending "big" on cooking utensils is a must. Generally, if you spend correctly, you spend once in a lifetime. For example, your pots, pans, knives, mixer, should all last a lifetime. Over that period, the cost is cheaper than every couple of years buying a new set. Also, you'll get to pass the expensive old sets down to your children, family, and friends.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-31-2009, 05:12 AM
 
Location: NY,NY
2,899 posts, read 8,304,910 times
Reputation: 2021
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlsmoore View Post
When I buy my dream car in a few years I'm gonna drop quite a bit (at least $30,000) but I'm a car enthausist and this is really the only item I want period. I'm paying cash of course and the value will increase as long as I take proper care of the thinig.
I'm a car enthusiast too.

What car do you plan on purchasing for $30K, that will appreciate its value over time? I'd like to know.

I presume you're talking about a used car? In that price range, off the top of my head, are you speaking of a Nissan 300zx or, maybe a Porsche 928?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-31-2009, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Ocean Shores, WA
5,082 posts, read 12,579,535 times
Reputation: 10543
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcoltrane View Post

...we finally moved to organic toilet paper....
Good move.

Our rectums deserve to be treated better.

They get no respect at all.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-01-2009, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Up in the air
19,126 posts, read 25,789,079 times
Reputation: 16226
We get our bread from a local bakery (whole ingredients) and it's $4 a loaf, but well worth it. It's hand made daily and has nothing artificial in it

As for grocery items... we get all our fruits and vegetables from a number of local organic farms and usually it's cheaper than purchasing from the grocery store, organic or not. We use sham-wows (love those things!) instead of paper towels for 99% of spills so that saves a bit of money and waste there.

We spend good money on base ingredients (flour, sugar, salt, spices etc.) which makes our meals tastier.
I think it's a good idea to spend big on things that you know you will use. Me and my boyfriend spent quite a bit of money on a new flatscreen tv last year because we really enjoy watching movies and documentaries. It was well worth the price, imo.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-01-2009, 11:39 AM
 
Location: southwestern PA
20,426 posts, read 35,707,564 times
Reputation: 38829
It's alright to 'spend big' for whatever is of value to you.

We all have things that others would consider splurges. I am frugal so that I CAN spend money on things I deem worthy.

As long as you can afford it, it's okay!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Frugal Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top