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Old 09-29-2009, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Warwick, RI
2,546 posts, read 3,857,073 times
Reputation: 4038

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Quote:
I have a B.S. in history, by the way, have lived in multiple countries, and have visited and studied dozens.

Attack me if you want, but the point is simple: in comparison, we don't pay much in taxes.
That's right, compared to socialistic Europe, we don't. AND WE WANT TO KEEP IT THAT WAY.
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Old 09-29-2009, 05:13 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
746 posts, read 1,246,866 times
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Quote:
pack your lunch and dont eat out save money and lose 20 lbs.
Amen, Brother.... I actually pack 2 PBJs most days for work.

a) Save $10-$12 for whatever garbage I would have purchased otherwise
b) Avoids buying huge, sloppy, terrible lunch that puts on the pounds
c) Most days I do NOT crave a particular lunch.... so it is a huge plus to have something... lets face it... going out to grab lunch is often a HUGE pain in the neck.
d) PBJ is easy. No need to refrigerate, etc...
e) PBJ is somewhat healthy if you use 100% WW bread, organic PB and go light on the jelly (or use some natural kind).

I do occasionally get made fun of for such a childish lunch.... but WHO CARES?
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Old 09-29-2009, 06:10 PM
 
Location: southern california
55,237 posts, read 72,402,860 times
Reputation: 47450
Quote:
Originally Posted by emilybh View Post
Right and grow your own produce with non hybrid seeds or seedlings.
tomatoes and figs yum yum.
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Old 10-02-2009, 05:50 AM
 
Location: North Texas
23,599 posts, read 31,143,716 times
Reputation: 26661
Appliances on standby is a big one. I do not want to pay for those little red lights or clocks to be on constantly so I got a surge protector that has an "always on" option for 2 plugs and the others can be clicked off with a remote control. My DVR is on all day but the TV, receiver, and DVD players receive no power when I'm sleeping or at work. I also unplug the coffee maker because I do not want to pay for the clock to be on all the time. I already have a clock in my kitchen!

As for washing dishes by hand...eh...it can be a money-saver, but if you have an efficient dishwasher then it will actually beat you in terms of water usage. A lot of times these days it's a wash (no pun intended).

Hanging clothes to dry is a good one. I hang some of my clothes to dry.

Another money gobbler is tire pressure. If you do not keep your tires properly inflated then your gas mileage will suffer and you'll waste money. Same with driving habits; if you jackrabbit off from a red light and rev the engine, you'll waste gas.

I am the type who will buy a bottle of water and refill that bottle until it cracks, and I pack a breakfast and lunch most days. I rarely eat out at work because it is terrible both for your wallet and your waistline.

For me a big money gobbler is doing my shopping all at the same store. I will clip coupons and check the weekly ads to see what is on special where, and make my list and plan my shopping trip according to that. I start at the furthest store and work my way back to the house and save quite a bit. Or I combine a trip to store A with an errand to Bank B that is nearby, so not all of my shopping is done at once. For example if apples are on sale at Sprouts and I am at the bank across the street, I will walk over and get my apples at Sprouts while I am near it.
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Old 10-02-2009, 07:21 AM
 
Location: I think my user name clarifies that.
8,293 posts, read 22,457,074 times
Reputation: 3868
I'd bet that a LOT of people would be surprised by how much money they spend each month "eating out."

My wife has a 1/2 hour lunch break. Since my schedule is usually pretty flexible, it was very handy for me to stop by her office, pick her up and we'd go through a McDs or BK drive-thru, sit in the car and eat & talk.

Because we're tightwads anyway, we'd usually get 1 Value Meal, and an extra sandwich. But even that ran us $6 - $8 per meal. So you multiply that by 5, then multiply that sum by 4.25, and you're looking at close to $150 per month.


A long time ago, I head somebody say, "If you pay close attention to your pennies, your dollars will take care of themselves." It's true. Unfortunately, most people don't.
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Old 10-02-2009, 07:28 AM
 
Location: I think my user name clarifies that.
8,293 posts, read 22,457,074 times
Reputation: 3868
Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleDolphin View Post
Insurance premiums of all types seem to be gobbling up our budget. We sure pay a bunch for 'peace of mind.' Or are we cowed into thinking we need home and health insurance? The car is mandated, but the other coverages? Not so sure...just got the run-down on long-term care insurance...now that's depressing!
Insurance companies exist to make money. Period. They do not exist to save you money.

Do you need Homeowners' Insurance? Unless you own your house outright, yes, the bank will require you to carry that insurance. But you can tweak your Homeowners' Insurance by raising your deductible, etc. *Remember that any claim is going to raise your premiums, so you might as well pay the small claims rather than huge premiums for the next 5 years.

Do you need Automobile Insurance? Yes. Every state requires you to have it. But if your car is paid for, you can drop down to Liability Only insurance, and save at least half. You can also lower your liability limits (your insurance agent will ALWAYS tell you NOT to do that - and for obvious reasons), but you can do it.

*Keep in mind that if you own both cars and a house, you'll get a substantial deduction if you insure them all with the same company. Also, shop around for insurance. YOU are the consumer! You're not obligated to use one particular brand.
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Old 10-02-2009, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Deep in the heart of Texas
1,917 posts, read 6,304,019 times
Reputation: 1957
Children and school are my money gobblers, they need money for field trips, teacher appreciation, fund raisers, etc, etc. Sometimes I think that homeschooling them may save me money. Heck I save a TON during the summer break!
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Old 10-02-2009, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Where the real happy cows reside!
4,281 posts, read 9,277,556 times
Reputation: 10414
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTR36 View Post
Children and school are my money gobblers, they need money for field trips, teacher appreciation, fund raisers, etc, etc. Sometimes I think that homeschooling them may save me money. Heck I save a TON during the summer break!
Last year we got bombarded by my son's school for stuff and that was just in the first few months. I learned to say "No" without the guilt. This year I think they have eased up a little.
I never understood the school photos in Fall and then again in Spring. The kids don't change that much in just a few months! Well, this year they are only doing the Fall photo. I don't buy them anyway since I'm not keen on the studio shots. I like photos that have a memory attached to them.

For those of you who like gardening, install rain barrels and dripper systems. Also, cut back on the amount grass space. Less grass equals less watering and mowing. Hopefully in the next few years we will have more beds dug which will be full of trees and bushes. Not only wonderful to look at, but will provide more shade and act as a wind barrier for our home. This will reduce the cooling and heating of the home. Great on the pocket book and the enviroment.
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Old 10-02-2009, 08:44 AM
 
Location: Southeastern North Carolina
1,607 posts, read 3,112,182 times
Reputation: 2802
Quote:
Originally Posted by LittleDolphin View Post
Insurance premiums of all types seem to be gobbling up our budget. We sure pay a bunch for 'peace of mind.' Or are we cowed into thinking we need home and health insurance? The car is mandated, but the other coverages? Not so sure...just got the run-down on long-term care insurance...now that's depressing!
Yes, insurance premiums are a black hole that I've thrown tens of thousands of dollars into over the years and have gotten little or nothing back.

Currently, the only insurance I have is what I'm required by law to have (car). I suppose soon we'll all be required to pay for health insurance, too. Happy days for the insurance companies--46 million new customers.

Right now, my biggest money gobbler is the grocery bill, esp. pet food. I'm free of all debt and live modestly, so I don't have any other big expenses.
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Old 10-02-2009, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
9,316 posts, read 17,951,460 times
Reputation: 7980
I am seriously amazed that nobody has clued in that HEALTH INSURANCE is NOT HEALTH CARE. The government is just going to make some insurance companies seriously rich at our expense.

Anyway, our biggest money saver is to be a producer whenever possible instead of a consumer. About three quarters of our food is either grown or hunted. We don't feed the hens in the backyard more than kitchen scraps and they get the bugs out of the yard AND give us eggs. We give them fertile eggs to set when one goes broody (we don't keep a rooster) and they even hatch out more chickens. Half of them will be roosters, but they taste just like chicken. We get some vegetables and things from our local farmer's market.

We get the majority of our "stuff" from yard and garage sales which are a year round thing in our area. Last week the project was building a picnic table from a pile of lumber and screws we'd found at a yard sale. This week I'm building a new screen door for the front of the house. I will probably have to buy some new screen to finish it off with, but that's cheaper than a whole new screen door. Although there will be garage sales tomorrow, perhaps there will be a roll of screen.

The other thing with garage sales is you get used to the idea that a quarter has a value all by itself. A book for a quarter, a dish towel for a dime, a coffee cup for a quarter, etc. All of a sudden, that pocketful of change has a value again so who wants to waste two or three dollars worth of it on one cup of coffee?

Oh, on the food thing, for the past several years we have been eating as low on the food chain as possible. The more industrialized and processed the food is, the less likely we are to buy it. The further away from us it was produced, the less likely we are to buy it. We generally drink tap water, it tastes good in our area and we know where it comes from and how it is handled before it gets to our house. We had some friends visiting who bought us a bottle of imported Italian water. It didn't taste as good as the water from the tap and the appalling waste of shipping a bottle of water from one side of the planet to the other just didn't seem to bother them.

I want to know where my food comes from. Even down to who grew it if possible. By eating very locally, we know these things and the money I spend on food stays in my neighborhood instead of going off to some sort of corporate office somewhere else.
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