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Old 10-02-2009, 12:34 PM
 
Location: I think my user name clarifies that.
8,293 posts, read 22,482,541 times
Reputation: 3869

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahkate_m View Post
It's really wierd that the regular windows all have double panes, while the ceiling in the top floor appears to be totally uninsulated. And the sound proofing between the units is amazingly wonderful.

I'm not sure if the high windows are double paned. I'll get the caulking your talking about & also use plastic to cover them - this weekend. Other than the ceiling, the upper tier windows are certainly a heat loss conduit.

When I started reading your post, I was hoping you were going to say you knew of a material I could apply to the ceiling *l*. Maybe I should just tack up plastic, but that would be so much hard work: it's like 20 feet up there, I'm guessing.

I'll see about putting plastic on the regular windows... The slider door for the balcony is also a bit of heat loss feature. On my side, I have insulated curtains for the slider. On my boyfriend's side, oddly enough there is a venetian blind. That makes zero sense, but that's how it is. I guess we can put plastic over at least 1/2 of that... Or put plastic on the outside on 1/2.

I know I have to put pictures of my breaker box on the house forum as suggested, to get ideas of what to say to the maintenance guy, etc.

As for fires: My boyfriend has renter's insurance. I should too.

Keeping my utilities as down as possible is my goal. I can definitely do the caulking & plasticizing the upper windows.

Thanks for the advice & concern,

Kate
In an earlier post you described the "ceiling" in the upper level as basically the roof boards with gaps showing the shingles. This means that it is a completely and totally uninsulated roof. And that alone will essentially cause you to lose all your heat. Short of a huge space heater, you won't be able to keep the place warm.

The best solution to that is insulation that fits between the 2x6s. But that's going to be expensive, and is going to be a bit difficult to install.
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Old 10-02-2009, 12:56 PM
 
Location: where the moss is taking over the villages
2,178 posts, read 4,715,255 times
Reputation: 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimhcom View Post
I agree that you should hold the landlords feet to the fire about this issue, in the interim you can purchase foil backed bubble wrap that has a good insulating value and staple it on the ceiling and where ever else you need it.
I looked it up & I'm starting here to research it: http://www.radiantguard.com/bubble-insulation.html

Also found this: http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/...THDStoreFinder

I wanted to compare HD to Lowes & found a thread on CD about this product at Lowes: http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread.php?t=140388 -- post #7...

Another CD thread: Radiant Barrier

MAYBE I'll make a drop down curtain with the radiant barrier to keep heat from escaping into the top level...*smiley's thinkin' now*

Thanks, Omaha, for the input.

Kate

Last edited by sarahkate_m; 10-02-2009 at 02:00 PM..
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Old 10-02-2009, 06:35 PM
 
Location: I think my user name clarifies that.
8,293 posts, read 22,482,541 times
Reputation: 3869
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahkate_m View Post
I looked it up & I'm starting here to research it: Easy-to-install and versatile foil bubble wrap insulation

Also found this: Thermwell 12 In. x 15 Ft. x 1/8 In. Self-adhesive Foil/foam Duct Insulation - FV516 at The Home Depot

I wanted to compare HD to Lowes & found a thread on CD about this product at Lowes: Radiant barrier from Lowes - HVAC-Talk: Heating, Air & Refrigeration Discussion -- post #7...

Another CD thread: Radiant Barrier

MAYBE I'll make a drop down curtain with the radiant barrier to keep heat from escaping into the top level...*smiley's thinkin' now*

Thanks, Omaha, for the input.

Kate
Radiant Barrier or Foam-Foil Insulation is a specialty application product.

It is good for things like insulating ductwork in unheated crawl-spaces. However, it's not cost-effective for general insulating purposes.


What you're after is "R-Value". You want the highest R-Value, covering the largest square-footage of space, for the least amount of money. And that requires purchasing the right kind of insulation.


Are you familiar with Craigslist? If you have a local "chapter" get on their and look in the "materials for sale" section. Sometimes you'll find some amazing deals on things like insulation, etc.
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Old 10-02-2009, 07:00 PM
 
Location: where the moss is taking over the villages
2,178 posts, read 4,715,255 times
Reputation: 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Omaha Rocks View Post
Radiant Barrier or Foam-Foil Insulation is a specialty application product.

It is good for things like insulating ductwork in unheated crawl-spaces. However, it's not cost-effective for general insulating purposes.


What you're after is "R-Value". You want the highest R-Value, covering the largest square-footage of space, for the least amount of money. And that requires purchasing the right kind of insulation.


Are you familiar with Craigslist? If you have a local "chapter" get on their and look in the "materials for sale" section. Sometimes you'll find some amazing deals on things like insulation, etc.

Far OUT. Will do: CL. Thanks for straightening me out, too.
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Old 10-27-2009, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Mountains of Oregon
15,072 posts, read 17,055,431 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahkate_m View Post
Far OUT. Will do: CL. Thanks for straightening me out, too.


When i've spent a few winters on the desert in AZ/NV with my Pace Arrow motorhome, i use Reflectix insulation from Home Depot.

http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/...ctId=100020855

I've used it on the inside of the windshield, some other windows, skylight, vents. It keeps the Heat in. Can also be used for walls (between studs), attic, etc.
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Old 10-27-2009, 04:12 PM
 
3,460 posts, read 4,795,886 times
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If there's a door or hallway leading into the uninsulated attic, you might want to consider sealing it off with plastic to keep the warm air downstairs.

The heat shrink stuff for windows really isn't very expensive, and it's crystal clear as long as you're careful installing it. All you have to do is to put some double sided tape around the window, press the plastic onto the tape, and then use a hair dryer to get rid of the wrinkles. Sealing off windows makes a huge difference!
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Old 10-27-2009, 04:20 PM
 
Location: where the moss is taking over the villages
2,178 posts, read 4,715,255 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hawk J View Post
When i've spent a few winters on the desert in AZ/NV with my Pace Arrow motorhome, i use Reflectix insulation from Home Depot.

Reflectix 24 In. x 25 Ft. Staple Tab Insulation - ST24025 at The Home Depot

I've used it on the inside of the windshield, some other windows, skylight, vents. It keeps the Heat in. Can also be used for walls (between studs), attic, etc.
You're a gem! A link for this lifesaver! Okay: will get. It's a deal at $21 for 25 feet.

Kate
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Old 10-27-2009, 04:22 PM
 
Location: where the moss is taking over the villages
2,178 posts, read 4,715,255 times
Reputation: 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by sterlinggirl View Post
If there's a door or hallway leading into the uninsulated attic, you might want to consider sealing it off with plastic to keep the warm air downstairs.

The heat shrink stuff for windows really isn't very expensive, and it's crystal clear as long as you're careful installing it. All you have to do is to put some double sided tape around the window, press the plastic onto the tape, and then use a hair dryer to get rid of the wrinkles. Sealing off windows makes a huge difference!
I'm a little worried about how removable the double sided tape is since this is a rental: can you tell me how good it comes off? I've seen the kits at HomeDepot.

I have some of my own plastic which is probably just a shrinkable... but double sided tape?

Kate
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Old 10-27-2009, 04:45 PM
 
3,460 posts, read 4,795,886 times
Reputation: 6677
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahkate_m View Post
I'm a little worried about how removable the double sided tape is since this is a rental: can you tell me how good it comes off? I've seen the kits at HomeDepot.

I have some of my own plastic which is probably just a shrinkable... but double sided tape?

Kate
It comes off really easily, and most of the kits give you a few alcohol pads to take care of any little spots of residue. I've never needed to use them.

I know you probably don't want to spend the money to buy the kits, but I'd encourage you to at least buy one to do the windows in the room that you use the most. The extra light that the good plastic will let in can make a huge difference in how much you need to use lamps and will help to reduce seasonal affective disorder if you tend to get depressed during the winter months.
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Old 10-27-2009, 04:59 PM
 
Location: where the moss is taking over the villages
2,178 posts, read 4,715,255 times
Reputation: 1229
Quote:
Originally Posted by sterlinggirl View Post
It comes off really easily, and most of the kits give you a few alcohol pads to take care of any little spots of residue. I've never needed to use them.

I know you probably don't want to spend the money to buy the kits, but I'd encourage you to at least buy one to do the windows in the room that you use the most. The extra light that the good plastic will let in can make a huge difference in how much you need to use lamps and will help to reduce seasonal affective disorder if you tend to get depressed during the winter months.

Thanks for the heads up, Sterling! I'll experiment... to see if I can shrink the plastic I have first, then I'll get at least one kit if it doesn't.

So far, it's been warmer than I expected so we've been able to keep it above 60 degrees upstairs most of the time by using the fire place (first time we've used it for heating).

We're trying to learn to burn the wood as slowly as possible...It's free but it takes nearly 3 hours to get one carload from one place to another & store it as well, so slow is good for usage.
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