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Old 12-02-2009, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Illinois
3,168 posts, read 4,158,185 times
Reputation: 5580

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Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
Try some of your local Latin/Hispanic markets. I shopped Liborio in Vegas today. Here are some of my best finds:

boneless chicken thighs .87/lb
pork roast .77/lb
yams 7lbs $1
broccoli 3lbs $1
white onions 7lbs $1
bananas 4lbs $1
potatoes 10lbs .79
carrots 4lbs $1
celery .79

I shop and cook once every 2 weeks. Today was shopping and I will be cooking tomorrow. Then I portion everything and freeze. I only dirty up the kitchen once.
I also shop at an international market, mostly catering to Hispanics. I agree, it's usually dirt cheap. Prices are also kept down because the products are shipped from just a short distance away, from farms in WI.

I cook most meals at home. I enjoy cooking so many times when I eat out, I go home and try to recreate the meal. I'm usually close enough that others think it's great.

I've been doing my own hair, nails, and facials since college. I look just as cute as people who spend top dollars for these services.

I almost never buy coffee. We have a community pot here at work. It isn't so bad. I mostly bring lunch from home but every now and then, I'll buy something just to treat myself.

I wash with cold water. Instead of setting my drawer to run a full cycle, I set it just before the air dry setting. I usually get dry clothes, especially since I tend to do laundry on one day each week. The constantly hot dryer helps my clothes to dry faster.

Investing in a deep freezer is a very good way to save money. Just shop the sales!
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Old 12-06-2009, 05:41 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 12,911,908 times
Reputation: 8127
Pay attention to the price per unit when comparing brands and types of groceries.

I've done this all my life, but it sure is easier now that unit prices are posted in grocery stores.

I have always known that larger containers does not always equal better deal/lower unit price.

This was true years back when you had yo do your own math comparing and still true today.
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Old 12-06-2009, 10:25 PM
 
3,460 posts, read 4,793,985 times
Reputation: 6677
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Keegan View Post
I'd love to hear you explain this to us. The Ford Escape gets an EPA estimated 28 mpg in the 2010 model. Even the 4cyl Hybrid version tops out at a combined 30 mpg. And we all know that those EPA estimates are best case scenario that most people never acheive. So what is it you did or do, to that vehicle to increase it's efficiency so much that you actually BEAT the EPA estimates?
Beating EPA estimates isn't hard if you don't do things that waste fuel.

Maintain your vehicle, check the air in the tires, no jackrabbit starts, let off the gas and coast when you see a red light ahead, leave the AC off when possible, combine all your trips when possible so you don't waste fuel warming up the engine, and drive at the speed the engine is most efficient (below the peak of the torque curve). My vehicle, for instance, gets 25% better mileage at 65 than it does at 75 because that's where the engine is happiest. The EPA doesn't take those sort of factors into account when they're determining mileage.

You can also save quite a bit by using your tires a little bit longer because worn tires give better mileage than new ones. Ribbed tires give better mileage than lug patterns. Hard tires give better mileage than soft rubber, etc.

If you do your homework, you can also tailor the vehicle you buy to your driving habits. Standard transmissions usually give better mileage than automatics. If you drive on the highways at faster speeds, it's a good idea to discuss the option of ordering a vehicle with taller gears. If you're mostly in stop and go traffic, you may want to sacrifice highway efficiency for stop and go efficiency with shorter gears.
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Old 12-07-2009, 10:38 PM
 
13,714 posts, read 22,848,304 times
Reputation: 18526
Quote:
Originally Posted by sterlinggirl View Post
You can also save quite a bit by using your tires a little bit longer because worn tires give better mileage than new ones. Ribbed tires give better mileage than lug patterns. Hard tires give better mileage than soft rubber, etc. .
And the $100-200 you save by stretching out tires an additional year is easily lost when you lose traction in the snow, spin out and cause a collision.

I have a friend who is always telling me how he can get 100k miles on OEM tires ... and has his car pulled out of a ditch each of the last three winters.
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Old 12-07-2009, 11:05 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,095 posts, read 12,750,527 times
Reputation: 14837
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
I thought this frugal forum would be interested in the result of this Harris Poll on what people are cutting back on to save money.
I see this as some people finally doing what a lot of us have been doing for years.

Dress in layers, keep the thermostat down
Don't buy junk food, and make your own lunch
Bulk food buying and store in a freezer
Do your shopping on the way home from work
Don't get pushed into buying the latest and greatest
Make your own coffee
Pay yourself first
Use it up, wear it out, make it do!
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Old 12-09-2009, 01:21 AM
 
11,433 posts, read 19,456,640 times
Reputation: 18140
All good ideas -- and my own biggie...

I use a cap style high lighting kit on my hair myself. Using a cap is really foolproof. At the salon I go to, having them highlight would be around 200 bucks.

And highlights grow out and need to be redone. The kits cost around 10 bucks a pop and I have to do it about 3-4 times a year, depending on my haircuts -- which I get about every three months.

I figure I don't spend 570 bucks a year on highlights.
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Old 12-12-2009, 09:31 PM
 
3,936 posts, read 5,450,243 times
Reputation: 4156
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallysmom View Post
All good ideas -- and my own biggie...

I use a cap style high lighting kit on my hair myself. Using a cap is really foolproof. At the salon I go to, having them highlight would be around 200 bucks.

And highlights grow out and need to be redone. The kits cost around 10 bucks a pop and I have to do it about 3-4 times a year, depending on my haircuts -- which I get about every three months.

I figure I don't spend 570 bucks a year on highlights.
Everyone I know goes to the salon to get their hair colored, at over $100.00! I've had it done a couple of times to see if it looked better, or lasted longer, and neither was the case. It wore off just as quick as coloring it at home, which isn't long at all. They go every month for a trim and color!
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Old 12-13-2009, 01:42 AM
 
Location: Saint Louis, MO
1,877 posts, read 3,860,942 times
Reputation: 857
On the topic of highlights/hair coloring...I actually go to a beauty school to get mine done. They charge $37 for full foil at the one near me, and it has always looked excellent. Great tip for anyone who stinks at doing it themselves like I do, haha.
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Old 12-13-2009, 11:24 AM
 
4,711 posts, read 10,528,250 times
Reputation: 3745
Quote:
Originally Posted by sterlinggirl View Post
....leave the AC off when possible...

And run the defroster only when necessary....the AC compressor also engages in the defrost mode....
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Old 12-16-2009, 11:56 PM
 
24 posts, read 100,547 times
Reputation: 36
Back in '07 i sold my gas guzzling Chevy Tahoe and on that same note got rid of my $500 a month car note. With the money that i made from that sale i bought me a 1999 accord with no car note. I'm still able to save the $500 a month that would've be going towards the car note.

My husband has a 1993 nissan truck that has almost 250K on it and it is still kickin'.. He WANTS and new truck but he knows that he dont NEED it. His truck is doing fine and gets him to where he needs to go with no problems.(he knows how to fix and maintain both cars so that helps). People laugh at him cause his truck is just plain UGLY.. but he don't care.. he just laughs at them cause his car is paid for and theirs isn't ...lol.

Other things we do to try and save money is we carpool to work, take home lunch, don't go out to eat, do alot of window shopping...Just don't buy unnecessary things. We don't try to keep up with the JONES'. It comes down to NEEDS and WANTS.
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