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Old 12-31-2009, 10:27 PM
 
3,007 posts, read 3,253,795 times
Reputation: 2001

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I used to spend a fair amount of money on clothes from Nordstrom's and Macy's. I haven't shopped at Nordstrom's for years now and I stopped shopping at Macy's this year, because the quality of the clothing is CRAP in addition to being ugly and exorbitantly expensive. I've done a couple of things to deal with my clothing needs. One -- I've basically developed a "uniform" of either a tailored or a denim skirt and jersey (winter) or cotton (summer) tops. I have only a couple of pairs of shoes and two pairs of boots. I have one coat. Two -- I now shop at Goodwill or other thrift shops, where I've found clothes that are a few years old but much better quality than the new stuff out there nowadays. There is a certain ick factor to used clothing so one has to consider one's comfort level with this. Basically I look for tailored skirts and blazers, since these are expensive items to purchase new. I will take it to be dry cleaned once or if machine washable, I wash it well a couple of times. Then I'm comfortable with it. It does take some time to peruse through thrift shops, which can be hard for people who have to work full time. But, I will say that I have found items of clothing that were never worn and still have the original tags on them, and I've found designer clothing I could never afford new and which is in very good condition. I found two designer blazers on sale for $4! I go to outlet stores for socks, underwear, and coats.

I can sew a little bit so I "remake" old clothes and do mending and other alterations myself.

I make double portions of entrees when I cook and freeze one. I freeze soups all the time.

We don't go out, but socialize with friends in each other's homes.

I started coloring my own hair and so far, so good. In some ways I'm more careful even than my hairdresser was, in terms of getting all my grey hairs covered!

No junk food or processed foods, and we don't eat meat, so most of our food comes from the bulk food section and the produce section.

No designer coffees.

We use the library instead of buying books.

Work that needs to be done around the house and yard, we do ourselves.

I had a crockpot and a breadmaker already, but didn't use them much before. Now I use them a lot by making soups and stews and fresh bread. Served with a salad, it makes a full meal and it's really cheap.

When we need furniture or an appliance or tv, we do a lot of comparison shopping before purchasing, go to bargain type stores, or search on craigslist for used stuff.

Not every tip will be useful for every situation obviously. For example, when I was working, it was more economical to just pick up an extra shift for more money and hire someone to refinish my hardwood floors than it would have been for me to try to do it myself during my days off. Now that I'm unemployed, it's clearly smarter to try to do home remodel jobs myself, even if there's a learning curve there.
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Old 01-01-2010, 08:52 AM
 
1,474 posts, read 2,016,184 times
Reputation: 457
Pay off my house in 2010, take the tax bite from early withdrawal and save the long term interest..............Thats my plan anyway unless my tax consultant tells me I am a blithering idiot.
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Old 01-04-2010, 12:26 PM
 
6,400 posts, read 6,499,594 times
Reputation: 9803
Let's see ...

We bought a professional quality clipper set a couple of years ago; I've been cutting my husband's hair twice a month ever since. at $14 plus tip per cut, that clipper has more than paid for itself, and keeps saving us money!

I've always colored my own hair; recently, I started cutting it, too.

I buy clearance or sale (with coupons, whenever possible). I'll buy markdown meats and either cook them that night, or freeze.

Whole chickens on sale are great money stretchers - I get 3 meals or more out the the chicken, and then make soup from the bones. Same with turkeys. I bought extra at the Thanksgiving sales.

Forage: we live in the desert southwest, and there's a fair amount of food to be found here. Right now, I have a pot on the stove that will be a treat for us - orange-lemon marmalade! We picked lemons this week, and I'll be freezing the zest and the juice for later use. Prickly pear fruit, mesquite beans, citrus fruits, olives - these are things we can use.

Bought a bread machine for $10 from Craigslist, barely used. I make our own bread, mostly whole grain, and don't waste all the money on store bought or the energy on heating up the oven.

We make our own laundry detergent, at a cost of about $.01-.015 per load. We use white vinegar as fabric softener for many items; those that need it get dryer sheets (when they run out, I'll make our own).
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Old 01-04-2010, 01:40 PM
 
454 posts, read 1,204,252 times
Reputation: 294
90% of EVERYTHING inside of our house (from computers to furniture to eggs) is bought from Costco. literally!
this saves us so much money.
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Old 01-13-2010, 07:42 AM
 
302 posts, read 520,503 times
Reputation: 193
"Recycle, reuse & refurbish....."

This was this year's Christmas exchange swap theme...
What an excellent idea It was a HUGE success!!!

How often do you receive something that perhaps you couldn't use, don't like, etc?

Also, for those they may not know...check out:
The Freecycle Network
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Old 01-14-2010, 03:06 PM
Status: "Summer, please don't leave!" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Asheville, NC
11,467 posts, read 25,695,605 times
Reputation: 4201
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emeraldmaiden View Post
Let's see ...

We bought a professional quality clipper set a couple of years ago; I've been cutting my husband's hair twice a month ever since. at $14 plus tip per cut, that clipper has more than paid for itself, and keeps saving us money!

I've always colored my own hair; recently, I started cutting it, too.

I buy clearance or sale (with coupons, whenever possible). I'll buy markdown meats and either cook them that night, or freeze.

Whole chickens on sale are great money stretchers - I get 3 meals or more out the the chicken, and then make soup from the bones. Same with turkeys. I bought extra at the Thanksgiving sales.

Forage: we live in the desert southwest, and there's a fair amount of food to be found here. Right now, I have a pot on the stove that will be a treat for us - orange-lemon marmalade! We picked lemons this week, and I'll be freezing the zest and the juice for later use. Prickly pear fruit, mesquite beans, citrus fruits, olives - these are things we can use.

Bought a bread machine for $10 from Craigslist, barely used. I make our own bread, mostly whole grain, and don't waste all the money on store bought or the energy on heating up the oven.

We make our own laundry detergent, at a cost of about $.01-.015 per load. We use white vinegar as fabric softener for many items; those that need it get dryer sheets (when they run out, I'll make our own).
How do you make your own laundry detergent?
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Old 01-15-2010, 08:59 PM
 
Location: NJ
2,111 posts, read 7,123,453 times
Reputation: 989
I make my own bread, pizza dough and started making rolls. I buy flour, yeast etc in bulk at Costco. I mostly use the no knead method but on a fly, use the bread machine to mix and knead. I basically do it to keep busy, being retired, but found it's economical too.

I bought onion rolls last week at $.59 each, time to make my own and I freeze them and use as needed.
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Old 01-26-2010, 04:57 PM
 
Location: St. Louis
9,457 posts, read 16,408,211 times
Reputation: 13154
* I buy almost all of my clothes at thrift stores and garage sales--I got a great leather coat at Goodwill for $30 last week and it's still in style!

* I don't own a dryer--I hang clothes around the basement to dry. The towels are a little stiff at first but I don't get bothered by that.

* Crockpots are great for beans and stuff and a chicken can be used twice--once for the chicken and another time for the broth--there are lots of minerals in the bones that are good for you.

* I combine errands so I'm not always driving.

* My favorite hobby is reading, which is cheap when you use the library. It would be cheaper if I could turn them back in on time.

* My other favorite hobby is traveling and I camp when I go somewhere expensive, or else I go somewhere not expensive. In certain places like Halong Bay in Vietnam, it is much cheaper to arrange the trip after you get there, than it is to arrange it from home. I'm thinking about Peru this summer, so will arrange for Machu Piccu in Lima instead of from home. I will save hundreds of $ that way. If you travel for cheap, you can get away with spending less money than you would at home. Oh, and I volunteer sometimes when I travel, in x-change for room and board.

* I didn't join a health club for years b/c I told myself that I could walk for free, but then I didn't walk, and wasn't getting exercise, so I decided maybe that was a false economy and I joined the city one for $27/month/family and go regularly so it's actually paying off. If it keeps me healthier, it's a budget item and it's 1/3 cost of the YMCA and just as nice.
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Old 01-26-2010, 06:05 PM
 
Location: In America's Heartland
929 posts, read 1,823,735 times
Reputation: 1173
Default I just saved $100...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jess5 View Post
Everyone I know goes to the salon to get their hair colored, at over $100.00! I've had it done a couple of times to see if it looked better, or lasted longer, and neither was the case. It wore off just as quick as coloring it at home, which isn't long at all. They go every month for a trim and color!

People pay over $100 to get their hair colored?

That's freakin unbelievable!!
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Old 01-27-2010, 07:59 PM
 
11,427 posts, read 19,438,504 times
Reputation: 18124
Quote:
Originally Posted by debtmonger View Post
People pay over $100 to get their hair colored?

That's freakin unbelievable!!
I go to a nice salon and pay 65 bucks for a haircut, but the cuts are the best..... I do my own highlights.... I can stretch a cut for 3 months, and my hair grows like a bad weed.

My stylist charges $150 for color -- more if your hair is long.

This isn't a high end salon, either.
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