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Old 10-27-2009, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
33,949 posts, read 32,397,399 times
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I thought this frugal forum would be interested in the result of this Harris Poll on what people are cutting back on to save money. Scroll down the article as the poll results differ by age.

"A new Harris Poll finds that more than half of all adults are saving money by purchasing more generic brands, while over 40 % are brown bagging more often and cutting back on visits to hairdressers and barbers. Over 30% have switched to tap water and cancelled one or more magazine subscriptions."

The Many Different Things People Are Doing To Save Money | Reuters
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Old 10-27-2009, 01:53 PM
 
5,273 posts, read 11,916,106 times
Reputation: 5750
We dropped cable and I watch the same stuff on the internet. I then hook my computer up to the TV and it's all good.

A couple of years ago we changed the heating in our house and dropped our electric bill 40%. We bought those euro convection heaters made for small rooms and thus far they work great.

We have also changed to buying most of our food in bulk and it saves a ton of money. We also plan our meals for the week and only buy what we need to cook them. For the two of us, we spend about $160 per month on groceries.
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Old 10-27-2009, 02:27 PM
 
26 posts, read 75,208 times
Reputation: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLAZER PROPHET View Post
For the two of us, we spend about $160 per month on groceries.
Very interesting, Blazer Prophet! Thanks for the info!

Got time to post more?

$160 a month?
What? Where? How?

What do you buy?
Where do you buy it?
How do you cook it?

From a single male who knows how to fix computers but is a failure cooking and choosing the right place to shop! Not trying to be a Chef, just looking for what and where to buy basic and bulk foods! Any tips would be appreciated!

Jimm in California
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Old 10-27-2009, 02:39 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,527 posts, read 29,252,557 times
Reputation: 21264
Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraC View Post
I thought this frugal forum would be interested in the result of this Harris Poll on what people are cutting back on to save money. Scroll down the article as the poll results differ by age.

"A new Harris Poll finds that more than half of all adults are saving money by purchasing more generic brands, while over 40 % are brown bagging more often and cutting back on visits to hairdressers and barbers. Over 30% have switched to tap water and cancelled one or more magazine subscriptions."

The Many Different Things People Are Doing To Save Money | Reuters
I know that I have said it before, but I encourage people to NOT, under any circumstances cut down on the QUALITY of the food that they eat. Substituting good, wholesome food for inferior products will only lead to weakening of the immune system, and other possible medical problems down the line. Eating the very best food that you can afford is the MOST IMPORTANT thing you can do for yourself and your family.

There are tons of other ways to cut down. Myself, I just stay off of eBay and Craigslist. LOL But seriously, cutting back on cell phone usage (or completely, if possible), and other electronic "toys" (including television), is the first, best choice.

Also, eating out, going to movies, spending time at the mall (SHOPPING!!!!), buying impulse items, magazines, etc. Buying JUNK FOOD! These are all areas where most people can cut back and save some money.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 10-27-2009, 02:57 PM
 
5,273 posts, read 11,916,106 times
Reputation: 5750
Quote:
Originally Posted by PS Cobalt Blue View Post
Very interesting, Blazer Prophet! Thanks for the info!

Got time to post more?

$160 a month?
What? Where? How?

What do you buy?
Where do you buy it?
How do you cook it?

From a single male who knows how to fix computers but is a failure cooking and choosing the right place to shop! Not trying to be a Chef, just looking for what and where to buy basic and bulk foods! Any tips would be appreciated!

Jimm in California

We shop at WINCO. They have markets located in WA, ID, NV, CA & OR- hence the name WINCO.

They have a great bulk section with spices, cereals, rice, flour, pasta, cocoa.... hundreds of items. We do not over buy and only buy what we need.

WINCO also sells some meats in an unbutchered pack. For example, a section of rib eye steak is $2.98/lb at the one we shop at. St Louis style ribs are about $7 for an entire rack... We cut it up and freeze it.

As to hamburger, we buy that at a local meat packaging plant. So fresh it hasn't even been frozen yet. It comes in 1/3 pound patties, angus beef... We put two to a freezer bag and pull out what we need to make tacos, sloppy joes... and it's all perfectly pre measured.

We make our own spaghetti sauce and freeze it as well in small packages so it'as just enough to add to pastas of various kinds.

But we do all kinds of things- used clothes, estate sales when we need furniture, we use a outdoor clothes line in the warmer months and run the dryer thru a trap during the colder months to heat the house...

As to driving, we drive slowly. Here's a true example. One of our vehicles is a shameless SUV- Ford Escape. In cruise control, I get 34 MPG at 55 MPH. That's not bad. If I drive 65, it drops to about 28 MPG.
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Old 10-27-2009, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
8,957 posts, read 17,013,046 times
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If you are under 50 yrs old then a study of how people lived during the Great Depression will teach you much on how to live life without "throwing money at it" as is so common today.

People during that time lived fairly with little and still were somewhat happy because life was not all about money and consumerism.
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Old 10-27-2009, 06:27 PM
 
12,671 posts, read 20,499,825 times
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Buy stuff you need and not want. Coupons, etc. Negotiate, research for deals.
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Old 10-27-2009, 07:43 PM
 
26 posts, read 75,208 times
Reputation: 36
Thanks, Blazer. Exactly the kind of tips I was looking for!

Jimm in California
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Old 10-28-2009, 10:13 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,436 posts, read 24,222,225 times
Reputation: 24749
Quote:
Originally Posted by PS Cobalt Blue View Post
Very interesting, Blazer Prophet! Thanks for the info!

Got time to post more?

$160 a month?
What? Where? How?

What do you buy?
Where do you buy it?
How do you cook it?

From a single male who knows how to fix computers but is a failure cooking and choosing the right place to shop! Not trying to be a Chef, just looking for what and where to buy basic and bulk foods! Any tips would be appreciated!

Jimm in California
Try some of your local Latin/Hispanic markets. I shopped Liborio in Vegas today. Here are some of my best finds:

boneless chicken thighs .87/lb
pork roast .77/lb
yams 7lbs $1
broccoli 3lbs $1
white onions 7lbs $1
bananas 4lbs $1
potatoes 10lbs .79
carrots 4lbs $1
celery .79

I shop and cook once every 2 weeks. Today was shopping and I will be cooking tomorrow. Then I portion everything and freeze. I only dirty up the kitchen once.
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Old 10-29-2009, 02:07 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
4,085 posts, read 7,450,988 times
Reputation: 2641
Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
Try some of your local Latin/Hispanic markets. I shopped Liborio in Vegas today. Here are some of my best finds:

boneless chicken thighs .87/lb
pork roast .77/lb
yams 7lbs $1
broccoli 3lbs $1
white onions 7lbs $1
bananas 4lbs $1
potatoes 10lbs .79
carrots 4lbs $1
celery .79

I shop and cook once every 2 weeks. Today was shopping and I will be cooking tomorrow. Then I portion everything and freeze. I only dirty up the kitchen once.
Try other ethnic grocers, also.

I shop at an Arabic food store for my middle eastern food ingredients; things like olives, dates, bulghur wheat, certain cheeses, spices, etc. are better, fresher, and cheaper than any grocery store. Jimm in California - depending on where you are, a similar thing would be an Armenian or Persian food store. (I'm Armenian - I visited a lot of great Armenian food stores in L.A., so if you're there you have this option.)

I also live near an Asian area in NJ, so I go to their food stores also. There is a big Japanese grocery/supermarket. I love Asian food, especially sushi, but it's expensive. By buying my own ingredients I can make sushi for a fraction of what I used to pay in a restaurant or for take-out.

For produce, find farm stands, farmer markets, or produce specialty stores. I have one near the Arabic food store, but I also have a farm market a few minutes from my house.

Shop wisely - stock up on sale items you know you will need.

Best bit of advice - LEARN HOW TO COOK. I know you're not looking to be a Chef and I'm not saying you should be one, but you should learn how to cook somewhat. The good news is that it has never been easier to learn how to cook, thanks to the internet. You can find any recipe you want online.

Since you're a single male (so am I), I would bet that you eat out somewhat frequently (like I once did). I know when I did that, it was because so much of what I loved seemed like such a mystery to make myself (and do a good job), or I felt it was too hard to make some things. But I found a lot of "clone recipes" of the things I liked. I used to love chili from Chili's, but now I can make it at home and have 10 bowls for the price of one there. I love fish tacos, and figured out how to make them at home.

When you learn to cook, you will find yourself buying more staple items, which are very cheap when you buy them in bulk or stock up on them when they're on sale. I buy lots of flour, sugar, butter, legumes like beans and split peas, rice, pasta, canned tomato puree, spices, and meat, amongst other things. When I buy meat, it's on sale and usually in a big package, so I get it home, I cut it up and portion it out, and I freeze most of it, leaving only what I will use in the next couple days in the fridge. When I use that last piece of chicken or hamburger or whatever, I take two more portions out and put them in the fridge; by the next evening, they're ready to use.

Produce has to be bought fresh, and I don't stock up much on produce. I do, however, by what's in season and fresh, as much as possible. If it's not in season then it's overpriced and not very good, so I consider going for frozen or canned instead of fresh. For example, right now tomatoes are not in season, and the ones I find everywhere don't look good plus they're overpriced. I use them by dicing them for certain meals, so instead of buying fresh, I am buying canned diced tomatoes. Next tomato season I'll go back to fresh ones.

Take some time in the next few weeks to research and find the best places for the things you need and you will soon see what's worthwhile to do or not. After a while, you will get to know what prices are best where, and how to go about shopping wisely, and in a short time (a few months) it will be second nature to find the best items for the best prices in the most efficient manner for your life. It just takes some initial effort, but it pays off in the long run.
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