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Old 11-05-2009, 10:29 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
29,741 posts, read 47,547,485 times
Reputation: 17600

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Quote:
Originally Posted by plaidmom View Post
We either need to move to a smaller town or ..... wait.
As a part of my pension package we have Tricare. Which requires no enrollment fees, no monthly fees.

We decided to move to an area which had been economically depressed for many decades [many failed industries], largely because my small pension would 'look' bigger in an area where nobody else is paid higher than minimum wage.

I had heard many times of medical offices that would refuse Tricare as it is known for paying less than other plans pay for things.

When we got to the state, I checked the Tricare office and was told about a local healthcare company that Tricare underwrites. And that many medical offices accept it, so I enrolled. I began paying my annual fees and my co-pays.

Now after being here, we have spoken with some of the medical offices, and learned that in this area 'all' medical offices accept Tricare. For the reasons stated previously. So enrolling in this other company was useless. Paying this other companies fees is useless.

But now that we are here, and we have PCPs, my Dw wants to keep this coverage plan. So we pay for it.

Had I known what I know now, I would have never asked the Tricare office about my options.



As for smallness of towns our township has 250 people. We drive into the nearest city which is only 20 miles away, they have 2 hospitals and multiple doctor's offices around.
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Old 11-06-2009, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,420 posts, read 42,789,579 times
Reputation: 11519
As to a privately owned car being a money pit, well, yes, it can be. If you live in the Salt Belt, well, yes you will have to replace your cars fairly frequently and these rust-buckets can be a PITA to work on. So you guys are, IMHO, screwed on this point. Not much I can suggest except leave that area. Life is too short...but I digress.

Anyway, me, in the PNW where we don't have much rusting issues, I run my old '82 Scirocco for about 10 cents per mile, most of this is fuel. No interest, no depreciation, DIY maintenance, cheap and easily available parts, extensive local and bigger enthusiast groups. The Aircooled VW Bug, Bus, and Ghia are one other frugal car choice, as are older Toyota, Honda, Nissan, etc. It's not impossible to do this stunt even if you don't bend your own wrenches, but it's do-able if you can find the right shop that knows these older cars. VW for some reason tends to have more good shops available. Do I have to say the dealer for these cars is worthless? Well actually the VW dealer is not entirely worthless, they do have parts for older cars, but most of them are all about late models...you spending big money on late models, to be specific...

Or, drive old American Iron, from the era when Detroit built cars people actually wanted - basically before 1973. Depending on what you get, it will probably be thirstier than the abovementioned imports, but they are very simple to maintain and repair, parts are uber-cheap, decently maintained they will go up in value.

For the ultimate in cheap motoring, convert an older VW Diesel to 100% Bio-Diesel, aka "Grease Car" and get the fuel for next to nothing. This, of course, involves skilled work, you have to know what you are doing, but most of the per-mile (as opposed to annualized expenses like insurance, tags, etc.) cost of running a paid-for car is fuel.

I think there are a few people on here who are running grease cars.
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Old 11-06-2009, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,447 posts, read 24,241,058 times
Reputation: 24784
Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
As to a privately owned car being a money pit, well, yes, it can be. If you live in the Salt Belt, well, yes you will have to replace your cars fairly frequently and these rust-buckets can be a PITA to work on. So you guys are, IMHO, screwed on this point. Not much I can suggest except leave that area. Life is too short...but I digress.

Anyway, me, in the PNW where we don't have much rusting issues, I run my old '82 Scirocco for about 10 cents per mile, most of this is fuel. No interest, no depreciation, DIY maintenance, cheap and easily available parts, extensive local and bigger enthusiast groups. The Aircooled VW Bug, Bus, and Ghia are one other frugal car choice, as are older Toyota, Honda, Nissan, etc. It's not impossible to do this stunt even if you don't bend your own wrenches, but it's do-able if you can find the right shop that knows these older cars. VW for some reason tends to have more good shops available. Do I have to say the dealer for these cars is worthless? Well actually the VW dealer is not entirely worthless, they do have parts for older cars, but most of them are all about late models...you spending big money on late models, to be specific...

Or, drive old American Iron, from the era when Detroit built cars people actually wanted - basically before 1973. Depending on what you get, it will probably be thirstier than the abovementioned imports, but they are very simple to maintain and repair, parts are uber-cheap, decently maintained they will go up in value.

For the ultimate in cheap motoring, convert an older VW Diesel to 100% Bio-Diesel, aka "Grease Car" and get the fuel for next to nothing. This, of course, involves skilled work, you have to know what you are doing, but most of the per-mile (as opposed to annualized expenses like insurance, tags, etc.) cost of running a paid-for car is fuel.

I think there are a few people on here who are running grease cars.
I drive a modded VW TDI Beetle(diesel). I get 55mpg at average freeway speeds and if I want, I can cruise at 120mph. It's a poor man's sports car!
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Old 11-07-2009, 12:29 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
20,836 posts, read 37,528,120 times
Reputation: 20899
Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
..., in the PNW where we don't have much rusting issues, I run my old '82 Scirocco for about 10 cents per mile, most of this is fuel. No interest, no depreciation, DIY maintenance, cheap and easily available parts, extensive local and bigger enthusiast groups. ... VW for some reason tends to have more good shops available. ...Actually I think dealers ARE worthless I keep a commercial acct at a VW parts place, and find other parts in my back yard stash (28 Diesel VW's , I have a friend in south central WA with over 100!!, we keep them in a 'corral')

For the ultimate in cheap motoring, convert an older VW Diesel to 100% Bio-Diesel, aka "Grease Car" and get the fuel for next to nothing. This, of course, involves skilled work, you have to know what you are doing, but most of the per-mile (as opposed to annualized expenses like insurance, tags, etc.) cost of running a paid-for car is fuel.

I think there are a few people on here who are running grease cars.
Yes, another requirement for a frugal destination Free, Clean, Grease

Folks have many different reasons and priorities for frugal living, so will different for all.

I like close proximity to plentiful fresh fruit and produce. (it is beneficial to live near a farm production area that has an active gleaner network.)

I find farm families often very good at sharing help and extra produce. Plus good bartering potential (food for work, trades for repairs, lots of community support)

The idea about proximity to an international airport hub is important to me. I like to escape frequently.

A Good library that mails books is handy too.

Living in a state with no income tax, on the border of a state w/ no sales tax has benefit.

AS ALWAYS review the tax assessment issues with the county staff!
Tax districts vary greatly within neighborhoods / towns / rural districts.

Places under 50,000 get USDA economic development benefits for businesses and commerce.

Depressed counties get benefits for new economic growth (can be in the form of 'credits' to job producers'.)

Farm assets (including house!!!) don't count for 'Expected Family Contribution' on your FAFSA !! (Financial aid for college). That is being frugal by potentially getting good aid support for you or your kids.

I think being within commute distance of a strong, diversified employment base is critical for my style of frugality. It allows me adequate shopping resources for bargains + potential 'renters' for income properties, AND a ready market in case I decide to sell primary residence and take increased equity tax free every 2 yrs.

Moderate climate is important to me, as I don't do HOT / Muggy, and would like enough solar gain for free passive heat (without firewood). I have cut that for 40 yrs. and I might be getting too old, tho 30 yrs younger than my neighbor who I was cutting wood with today.
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