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Old 11-23-2009, 04:51 PM
 
Location: southwestern PA
20,426 posts, read 35,707,564 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GloryB View Post
It is amazing all the crap they teach in HS while totally neglecting to teach a kid how to balance their checkbook or the importance of maintaining a good credit score.
Some schools teach money management... ours do!
And I don't think my kids got "crap" while in high school.

Sad that yours does....
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Old 11-24-2009, 07:40 AM
 
Location: Valley City, ND
625 posts, read 1,606,726 times
Reputation: 527
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas User View Post
........Its all about business.

Parents should teach their children money.

How can the parents teach when they themselves don't have a clue and are up to their eyeballs in debt trying to 'keep up with the Jones'?
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Old 11-26-2009, 10:26 PM
 
12,671 posts, read 20,489,997 times
Reputation: 2618
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
His "getting out of debt" lectures are a lot better than his investment advice. Some of his investment advice is just not very good - especially his insistence that the market averages a 10-12-14% return on average. I could live with the 10% but over the years, Dave's numbers keep rising.
Those returns are correct. Its an estimate.
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Old 11-26-2009, 10:27 PM
 
12,671 posts, read 20,489,997 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pitt Chick View Post
Some schools teach money management... ours do!
And I don't think my kids got "crap" while in high school.

Sad that yours does....
Like what?

We are not talking about Finance classes right? What is the name of the course?
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Old 11-26-2009, 10:28 PM
 
12,671 posts, read 20,489,997 times
Reputation: 2618
Quote:
Originally Posted by 3-Oaks View Post
How can the parents teach when they themselves don't have a clue and are up to their eyeballs in debt trying to 'keep up with the Jones'?
Then they should not have had a kid in first place. You have to manage youirself first before having a kid and adding more debt.
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Old 11-27-2009, 08:46 AM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,095 posts, read 12,740,520 times
Reputation: 14832
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pitt Chick View Post
Some schools teach money management... ours do! And I don't think my kids got "crap" while in high school. Sad that yours does....
Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas User View Post
Like what? We are not talking about Finance classes right? What is the name of the course?
Tennessee public high schools - high school students must take (and pass) a class in personal finance, a crash-course that will address four primary topics including income standards, money management, spending and credit systems, and savings and investment.

The state of Ohio - as of 2010, personal finance courses will be mandatory for all public high school students.

The above 2 examples were found in less than 2 minutes of Googling.

My local community college (California) offers money management classes - budgeting, writing checks, understanding credit, obtaining mortgages and financing, opening banking accounts, monitoring a credit score, other loans, the basics in investing like stocks and bonds, budgeting, preventing credit theft, and teaching on making plans for retirement. Students from the local high schools attend these classes, along with other ages.

Sometimes parents are more insistent that their kids take calculus, rather than taking a simple bookkeeping course that will teach what people need in life.

How does your local school board think? Some school boards reason against money management classes - concerned that adding these types of life courses could be too much for already overwhelmed students. Schools also dispute that high school is preparation for college not for life.
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Old 11-27-2009, 08:49 PM
 
13,710 posts, read 22,826,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gandalara View Post
Sometimes parents are more insistent that their kids take calculus, rather than taking a simple bookkeeping course that will teach what people need in life.

How does your local school board think? Some school boards reason against money management classes - concerned that adding these types of life courses could be too much for already overwhelmed students. Schools also dispute that high school is preparation for college not for life.
You are making the assumption that calculus is not a "need." Many of the kids taking calculus are heading toward engineering and other fields where such math is required.

While I believe that money management is a need, I would not have my children sign up for such a course without reviewing what they are actually being taught. I was one of the reviewers of the AICPA's Feed the Pig curriculum, I had some serious concerns with some of the messages that it was promoting, especially in the area of taking on debt.
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Old 11-27-2009, 09:25 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,095 posts, read 12,740,520 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
You are making the assumption that calculus is not a "need." Many of the kids taking calculus are heading toward engineering and other fields where such math is required.
No, I wasn't assuming. A money management course could be taken as a requirement for graduation, without interfering with their projected course in life. Make it a requirement for their freshman year! But if all they get are brain-smart classes and no common-life-sense classes ... Sheesh. I know 2 women who work at a college, both in their late 30's - and they have never balanced their checkbooks. They 'trust' the bank.

I was talking about the parents who say, "Money management is just a dumb person's math class. You need algebra, you need trig, you need calculus." I'm in and out of the enrollment office - and I hear this at least once a week.
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Old 11-27-2009, 09:59 PM
 
13,710 posts, read 22,826,319 times
Reputation: 18521
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gandalara View Post
No, I wasn't assuming. A money management course could be taken as a requirement for graduation, without interfering with their projected course in life. Make it a requirement for their freshman year! But if all they get are brain-smart classes and no common-life-sense classes ... Sheesh. I know 2 women who work at a college, both in their late 30's - and they have never balanced their checkbooks. They 'trust' the bank.
Like a freshman year course is going to influence people to balance their checkbook?

I have seen business clients not balance their cash and bank accounts on a monthly basis ... and wonder why the trusted Ap clerk made off with $25k or more. And they had a lot more education.

In this country, we painfully few people who can understand advanced mathematical principles and that is why we are lagging so far behind and IMPORT thousands of engineers.
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Old 11-27-2009, 10:58 PM
 
Location: SoCal desert
8,095 posts, read 12,740,520 times
Reputation: 14832
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawrence01 View Post
Like a freshman year course is going to influence people to balance their checkbook?
Maybe not influence, but hopefully they'd at least know how.

You and I have very different thoughts on what is needed. So I'll just stop now
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