U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Frugal Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-05-2010, 07:06 AM
 
3,060 posts, read 6,862,050 times
Reputation: 3249

Advertisements

My OH and I love soybeans, chickpeas and other beans and pulses. Pulses cook quickly and use little energy, but I am a bit freaked out by the amount of cooking time that chickpeas require! I love the cost saving of buying the dried chickpeas, (and they turn out better than what I can buy here canned) but the amount of energy for stated cooking time is formidible. Has anyone perfected a way to cook beans (chickpeas in particular) in a fashion that is significantly energy saving? PS. I just got a second-hand pressure cooker from my mother-in-law but haven't ventured to use it yet Help!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-05-2010, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
16,594 posts, read 50,355,083 times
Reputation: 26834
My little brothers are a tough bunch, eh? You could get 'em nice and riled up, them stuff them in a soup thermos for a few hours, or use a crock pot, or build a stand for a small pot above a candle or paraffin lamp, or make a solar box cooker, or use the pressure cooker, or any of a number of other ideas. If you consider long cooking times, 99% of the energy waste is because of lack of insulation. It used to be common for some of these foods to be brought to a boil in a cast iron pot, and then stuff the pot and food into a box filled with straw.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2010, 10:43 AM
 
4,101 posts, read 5,806,708 times
Reputation: 5637
A pressure cooker really cuts the time down, but be very careful with beans or any lentils. Read the directions for your cooker, all lentis have the habit of producing foam, if the foam plugs up the vent, your cooker become a bomb. Usually when it explodes it's the top that hits your ceiling (along with the beans), but it could injure or burn you if you're close by. This happening makes a huge mess in your kitchen.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2010, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
8,957 posts, read 16,746,135 times
Reputation: 7193
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunshineleith View Post
My OH and I love soybeans, chickpeas and other beans and pulses. Pulses cook quickly and use little energy, but I am a bit freaked out by the amount of cooking time that chickpeas require! I love the cost saving of buying the dried chickpeas, (and they turn out better than what I can buy here canned) but the amount of energy for stated cooking time is formidible. Has anyone perfected a way to cook beans (chickpeas in particular) in a fashion that is significantly energy saving? PS. I just got a second-hand pressure cooker from my mother-in-law but haven't ventured to use it yet Help!
The Pressure Cooker is the key to much good food cooked very quickly using very little energy. Beans and other legumes are a #1 food to cook in a pressure cooker.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2010, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
8,957 posts, read 16,746,135 times
Reputation: 7193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nite Ryder View Post
A pressure cooker really cuts the time down, but be very careful with beans or any lentils. Read the directions for your cooker, all lentis have the habit of producing foam, if the foam plugs up the vent, your cooker become a bomb. Usually when it explodes it's the top that hits your ceiling (along with the beans), but it could injure or burn you if you're close by. This happening makes a huge mess in your kitchen.
This "foam" problem can be handled quite well by washing your beans in clear cold water before you do anything else with them.

But yes there are some things to know before you use a pressure cooker but not to worry they are all simple and easy to learn. Just don't let all this new learning scare you off since a pressure cooker is a wonderful kitchen cooking tool.

http://www.gopresto.com/recipes/ppc/howtouse.php

http://missvickie.com/

http://missvickie.com/library/benefits.html

http://missvickie.com/workshop/safety.html

http://missvickie.com/workshop/safety2.html

http://www.fabulousfoods.com/usa/article/222/19975

http://www.ehow.com/how_2092662_use-...re-cooker.html

Last edited by Grandpa Pipes; 03-05-2010 at 10:56 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-05-2010, 12:29 PM
 
29 posts, read 84,659 times
Reputation: 29
Soak the dry beans/chickpeas in water for 8 to 10 hrs and then pressures cook them. If in a hurry soak time can be reduced by soaking them in hot water in an insulated(thermos type) dish for an hr or so.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-06-2010, 11:42 AM
 
3,060 posts, read 6,862,050 times
Reputation: 3249
Thanks very much everyone!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2010, 08:55 AM
 
Location: NoVa
2,004 posts, read 2,732,243 times
Reputation: 2691
Make sure you have enough water in the cooker or the beans will get burned. I use 1:4 ratio to make dhal - an indian version of lentils soup (1 part lentils and 4 parts water).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2010, 01:51 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
1,360 posts, read 3,808,297 times
Reputation: 794
I use a crock pot so I can just set it and forget it. Get a nicely insulated on helps, though it's not as fast or efficient as the pressure cooker.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-09-2010, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,120 posts, read 41,961,990 times
Reputation: 10944
FWIW you can slow-cook on the top of your woodstove, if you use one. You can wrap potatoes, sweet potatos, etc. in foil and throw them into a low fire as well.

If you heat with and cook with the same energy source, the heat loss from your stove to the room is a "wash" with electric (unless you have a heat pump) or gas (the stove is a bit more efficient as it's unvented).

If optimizing your energy use for cooking is your biggest opportunity to economize, you are the King of Frugality...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Frugal Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top