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Old 11-30-2017, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,738 posts, read 21,787,854 times
Reputation: 27806

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kophi View Post

I was happy to find that my car started right up and ran just fine in spite of
having sat unused for awhile (another thing that concerned me about hanging
onto it if I'm not using it regularly enough).

-
If you live in an area that's cold in the winter and your battery is old, you should start and drive it regularly. Colder and older means more starts and trips, but you don't have to go far. Drive around the block 10 times if you don't have anywhere to go. Don't let the gas get too low. Even if you decide to sell in a few months, it's got to start and run.

 
Old 12-02-2017, 02:50 AM
 
75 posts, read 29,601 times
Reputation: 72
i love cars so its been hard for me but the wife and i share one small efficient car and when its paid for we will keep it and drive it till it can't anymore. we have had to carefully plan work schedules carpool sometimes uber or bike but the money and time we save on a second vehicle is nice. oh and rent a truck when needed or get delivery
 
Old 12-02-2017, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,738 posts, read 21,787,854 times
Reputation: 27806
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdoll88 View Post
i love cars so its been hard for me but the wife and i share one small efficient car and when its paid for we will keep it and drive it till it can't anymore. we have had to carefully plan work schedules carpool sometimes uber or bike but the money and time we save on a second vehicle is nice. oh and rent a truck when needed or get delivery
I've suffered one car in a semi-rural area. You do what you have to do. I've shopped for groceries and gotten my hair cut in the evening. Better than weekends.
 
Old 12-03-2017, 07:28 PM
 
84 posts, read 88,457 times
Reputation: 69
My family and I live in a rural area. So a vehicle out here is a necessity. We have two vehicles. Our car is paid off and the truck is a company vehicle. So it’s nice to have that going for us.
 
Old 12-03-2017, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
2,276 posts, read 930,377 times
Reputation: 4974
I've known some people who have moved to large cities and have gone car-free. It seems to have worked out okay for them and when they need to travel long-distance they simply rent a car.

I personally couldn't do this for both practical reasons and desires. I work 40 miles away and there is certainly no transportation to and from there other than the car I'm the only one crazy enough to live that far away from work in this snowbelt city. I really have no desire to live in the city I work in though, since my current location is right off a major interstate thruway and the city I work in is pretty far removed from ANYWHERE.

I also just love to drive and take road trips; it's one of my hobbies. I couldn't see not having a car and personally wonder how people who live car-free do it. I do enjoy walking around cities but still like to be able to hop in a car and go if I choose.

We have 2 cars and unfortunately 2 car payments. We had 2 cars that were paid for but you already know that the minute you pay off the last car...something happens and you end up having to get new cars
 
Old 12-03-2017, 07:42 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
3,666 posts, read 1,775,662 times
Reputation: 2210
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetgraphics View Post
THROTTLED TROLLEY
The destruction of privately owned electric traction rail transport (urban and interurban) was deliberate.

Between 1890 - 1920, 90% of all urban travel was by rail.

But public subsidy of the competition, conspiracy by the auto / oil / pavement hegemony, animosity of the mainline steam railroads, taxation of the urban rail companies, compounded by income taxes that drained revenue - while imposing fare caps - spelled the death knell of America's once foremost rail system.

Unlike other taxed companies that could shift their taxes into their retail prices, fare caps insured that the rail companies were throttled to death by declining revenues, while suffering ever greater burdens.

(To be fair, there were also other factors that aided in the destruction of urban rail - pandemics and subsequent quarantines emptied cars for months at a time - union strikes reduced workmen passengers - and hostile takeovers by financial powers only interested in gutting the valuable assets.)
= = = =
Most of the other factors you mention played a bigger role in killing off urban electric rail transport than the GM/Firestone Tire/Mack Truck/SOCal conspiracy did. (In fact, many NCL cities kept streetcars around after the non-NCL properties had sent their last streetcars to Trolley Valhalla. In Philadelphia's case, they survived all the way into the public authority era, and the public authority went about cutting the ones that remained a little faster than the NCL management did.)

Another law that helped speed their demise was something called the Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935. Its target was Chicago utility and traction magnate Samuel Insull, but it claimed many utility-owned transit systems as collateral damage.

Those fare caps were often imposed by local politicians who heeded popular pressure against the "greedy" traction barons.

And many of those traction companies were undercapitalized and funded with watered stock.
 
Old 12-08-2017, 11:50 PM
 
Location: Prepperland
13,123 posts, read 9,212,549 times
Reputation: 8988
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarketStEl View Post
Most of the other factors you mention played a bigger role in killing off urban electric rail transport than the GM/Firestone Tire/Mack Truck/SOCal conspiracy did. (In fact, many NCL cities kept streetcars around after the non-NCL properties had sent their last streetcars to Trolley Valhalla. In Philadelphia's case, they survived all the way into the public authority era, and the public authority went about cutting the ones that remained a little faster than the NCL management did.) [A single defeat of NCL is not proof it did not destroy the remainder of the electric traction urban lines]

Another law that helped speed their demise was something called the Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935. Its target was Chicago utility and traction magnate Samuel Insull, but it claimed many utility-owned transit systems as collateral damage.

Those fare caps were often imposed by local politicians who heeded popular pressure against the "greedy" traction barons.

And many of those traction companies were undercapitalized and funded with watered stock.
So when a company cannot pass increased tax and overhead costs to its customer, due to government meddling, it's not a "conspiracy" when it goes bust?

OKAY.
 
Old 12-09-2017, 04:56 AM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
3,666 posts, read 1,775,662 times
Reputation: 2210
Quote:
Originally Posted by jetgraphics View Post
So when a company cannot pass increased tax and overhead costs to its customer, due to government meddling, it's not a "conspiracy" when it goes bust?

OKAY.
Not as traditionally defined, for the public officials who maintained the fare caps were responding to public clamor in favor of their retention. This proved particularly harmful to the two private companies that ran New York's extensive subway system. A conspiracy usually requires private or public actors working without public knowledge of their actions. The fare caps were matters of public record.

By the way, why the bold red italics? That usually indicates moderator action on CD forums.

My point about NCL was that most cities where NCL never owned trolleys got rid of them sooner than the NCL properties did. Kansas City Public Service's streetcars took their last trip to the carbarn in 1957; the NCL-owned St. Louis system kept them in service until 1963.

Twin Cities Rapid Transit got rid of theirs in the 1950s, and Chicago Surface Lines shut down a far more extensive system on the eve of the creation of the Chicago Transit Authority ca. 1950. (That latter act is why the first fleet of rapid transit cars the CTA received was built from PCC car platforms and bodies.) Los Angeles City Lines ran them until 1961. By contrast, the Southern Pacific Railroad, which controlled the Pacific Electric Railway, was petitioning for the abandonment of most of its network near the end of World War II and agreed to keep all of the system running past the end of 1944 because the city of Los Angeles asked it to wait until a referendum on a rapid transit system that would have used PE rights-of-way (and its downtown subway tunnel) had taken place. (Despite the support of the Los Angeles Times, the referendum failed.)

Not only Philadelphia but El Paso also ran streetcars into the era of public control. El Paso's might still be running today had the Mexican government not built a customs station atop the southbound track of that city's international streetcar line in the early 1970s.

I could go on in this vein for a while. The conspiracy the NCL partners were convicted of was that of cornering the market for buses, bus parts and supplies.
 
Old 12-09-2017, 02:24 PM
 
11,714 posts, read 16,468,880 times
Reputation: 16436
Well, whatever happened in Chicago or El Paso 100 or 50 years ago is history.

When we lived in DC I tried to public transportation thing. Hair, makeup, hose, heels - 100F and two busses and one subway. Fare was not much cheaper than parking garage.

Have you ever gotten on a bus with a rifle case and a bag with ammo?
 
Old 12-09-2017, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Germantown, Philadelphia
3,666 posts, read 1,775,662 times
Reputation: 2210
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threestep View Post
Have you ever gotten on a bus with a rifle case and a bag with ammo?
Can't say as I have, and I'm sure that I'd get looks at the very least if I did.

But I do know that there are some things public transportation simply is not suited for. Hauling large cargoes like a week's worth of groceries is one. Carrying large musical instruments is another; I have seen people carry guitars, woodwinds and horns on the subway, but I have yet to see anyone bring a cello down.
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