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Old 04-14-2010, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
8,957 posts, read 17,005,188 times
Reputation: 7193

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Quote:
Originally Posted by las vegas drunk View Post
Wait a second. I work approximately 5-6 miles away. It takes me 12 minutes at most to get there. I would love to see you do that on a bicycle.
I've ridden the 7 miles to the nearest town to shop or do other business many times in the past. The trip took at most 25 min at a reasonable pace so I know that anything under 15 miles is a doable distance for most people on a bike.

Trip cost was ZERO!

 
Old 04-14-2010, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
8,957 posts, read 17,005,188 times
Reputation: 7193
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
Yours is the ideal situation, Tightwad. And in fact, since 93 percent of the population of this country lives in towns with a population of 50,000 or greater, it is infinitely doable for the majority.

Sadly, however, for the remaining 7 percent of us who live in a rural environment, not having a car at our disposal would be folly at best. I live 17 miles from the nearest grocery store and there is nothing resembling public transit available to me. I wish that it were different, but until our country decides that caring for the wellbeing of its citizens is more important than blowing up people from other countries in the name of "freedom", we are stuck with the system we have, unfortunately.

20yrsinBranson
"I" never said that I rode to work on a bicycle nor could I in my area. I drove like others or car pooled if I could since I , too, live in a rural area. That said, I NEVER drive in town during warmer times of year. During the winter months I stock up so my trips using a car are limited to work travel. Now that I'm retired my vehicles sit unused most of the year.

So cycling can be done in rural areas if one plans just a bit.
 
Old 04-14-2010, 04:30 PM
 
Location: San Diego
2,858 posts, read 6,202,862 times
Reputation: 1962
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tightwad View Post
In reality the time to travel 2 miles , or 5 miles, on a bike is very short compared to walking. At times a bike is FASTER than a car over the same distance.

Not in SoCal my friend. I really don't feel like riding my bike where I would get dropped off as well, not exactly the nicest area. Plus, I'm in business attire so I can't go to work smelling like ass. I'm pretty sure my lunch for the day would go bad or just get beat the hell up. Most of the streets in SoCal are not bike friendly. Getting to the train stop from my house wouldn't take too long...maybe ten minutes but ride from the stop to work would take at least 30 minutes. I'm a pretty fit dude but there are alot of traffic lights. All in all, my commute would double and I already take about an hour to get to work. Do that 5 times a week? No way in hell. What about on the weekend? None of my friends live 10 miles from me. Its SoCal, everyone lives far from everyone.
 
Old 04-14-2010, 04:39 PM
 
5,748 posts, read 10,504,424 times
Reputation: 4494
A very interesting read on the subject...

Carjacked: The Culture of the Automobile and Its Effect on Our Lives
 
Old 04-14-2010, 04:52 PM
 
5,019 posts, read 12,469,856 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tightwad View Post
Don't settle for wishing. Figure ways to DO IT!
Like you, and formercalifornian, we've engineered our lives to be car-lite.

We still keep a van, but it often sits unused for weeks at a time.

It is about making choices. Where to work, where, and how to live. For us it's a slightly smaller house in-town and in a smallish town.

It also means dropping some cash up front (for most people) for a good solid reliable bicycle and the accessories (lights, tools, trailers or panniers etc).

I must say, one of the intangible uspsides is the feeling of general contentment and well-being. Less stress and also better health. For us it's win-win-win.
 
Old 04-14-2010, 05:21 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
20,794 posts, read 37,464,612 times
Reputation: 20849
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tightwad View Post
I've ridden the 7 miles to the nearest town to shop or do other business many times in the past. ... so I know that anything under 15 miles is a doable distance for most people on a bike.

Trip cost was ZERO!
But not always a real cheap way to commute..., tho I'm and avid biker, I have had 3 friends killed doing so, (one recently), and almost everyone I know who bikes A LOT has been put in the Hospital due to either being hit, or crashing.

Now that I have to be "self-insured" for healthcare, I hope my number comes as a fatality, as at least I still can afford life insurance. As previously mentioned, 2010 is a great yr to die!!! (tax reasons). I think I'll oil up the bike and hit the road! My family will enjoy a much more pleasant retirement.
 
Old 04-14-2010, 07:33 PM
 
5,748 posts, read 10,504,424 times
Reputation: 4494
Quote:
Originally Posted by plaidmom View Post
Like you, and formercalifornian, we've engineered our lives to be car-lite.

We still keep a van, but it often sits unused for weeks at a time.

It is about making choices. Where to work, where, and how to live. For us it's a slightly smaller house in-town and in a smallish town.

It also means dropping some cash up front (for most people) for a good solid reliable bicycle and the accessories (lights, tools, trailers or panniers etc).

I must say, one of the intangible uspsides is the feeling of general contentment and well-being. Less stress and also better health. For us it's win-win-win.
I think sometimes people forget that a house in the exurbs, thirty or more miles from work, isn't the only way for a family to live. There is a significant downside to a car-dependent lifestyle. Sadly, though, in many regions there are few viable alternatives.
 
Old 04-16-2010, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,392 posts, read 42,724,996 times
Reputation: 11475
If one knows what he's doing, it's quite possible to own and drive several cars for way less than the average Joe pays for a car.

Now a nitwit who insists on something as new or newer than the one in the next McMansion's driveway next door, can't troubleshoot his way out of a urine-soaked paper bag, and wouldn't be caught changing his own oil, is going to pay. And to this guy, I say "Stupid hurts, and it should hurt!"

By far my largest expense per mile is fuel. And most of my "regular daily driver" cars get 33-35 MPG, so that's not exactly killing me.
 
Old 04-16-2010, 11:11 PM
 
Location: Tucson, AZ
2,161 posts, read 7,485,831 times
Reputation: 2890
I live in a bicycle friendly "almost paradise" in Orange County, with a vast network of bike lanes running along the shoulder of almost every cross town street in the area. Maybe several thousand miles of bike lanes in my area. I have not driven to work at all in the past 3 years. In the past 10 year, bike commuting has been my most common mode of transportation. As a back up, I can take a bus to work. There is a bus stop less than 1 block from where I live, and it goes every half hour and gets me within 2 blocks of my office. Sure I have a car, but it rarely gets used Monday thru Friday. Weekends the car gets used for an occasional trip out of the megalopolis, or perhaps a shopping trip. But most things I need are within a mile of home so walking or a short ride on an errand bike does the job just fine.

Car-lite living is a viable, reasonable option in many suburbs and medium sized cities, even if public transit is not available. I enjoy the freedom of knowing that I can get around without a car for days or weeks. Heck, I even have a "beater bike" that I can pedal 6 miles to the Amtrak station and lock it up with a big fat U lock. I can leave it there all day or many days and it will still be there so I can pedal it home after a train trip. It's not about the money, it's about the freedom to know that I don't need to send my cash to a far away oil soaked dictator just to get around town.
 
Old 04-16-2010, 11:41 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
4,486 posts, read 14,922,691 times
Reputation: 3919
Am I the only person who enjoys having a vehicle?

I'm not against bicycling but it's quite difficult to commute to work on a bike where I live! I enjoy having cars, they've always been a hobby of mine. Nothing like driving on the freeway in my Corvette convertible on a nice spring day !
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