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Old 04-17-2010, 06:13 PM
 
16,301 posts, read 24,240,875 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plaidmom View Post
You live in ASHEville NC and you've never seen a BOB trailer:

bob trailer - Google Search

????

Seriously?

I have a hard time swallowing that.
Seen them all the time, but never with anything that would be more than a day's groceries, the most uneconomical way to shop. Certainly nothing like a 40 lb bag of dog food, or a 40 lb bucket of cat litter.

It ain't as flat here as it is in Indiana where you are, big difference if you a load in your cute little trailer.

 
Old 04-17-2010, 06:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sponger42 View Post
I often carry a 115lb passenger without issues. Buying a well-built rack is key as cheap ones will buckle if you hit a big bump.
It ain't about the ability of the bike to support the weight or not, it is about the ability of the rider to peddle up long steep climbs with the extra weight aboard. My house for example is approximately 400 feet higher than the closest grocery store, but it is only 2.2 miles away. Most of the climb is done in about a half mile section of road.
 
Old 04-17-2010, 06:59 PM
 
5,019 posts, read 12,473,110 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asheville Native View Post
Seen them all the time, but never with anything that would be more than a day's groceries, the most uneconomical way to shop. Certainly nothing like a 40 lb bag of dog food, or a 40 lb bucket of cat litter.

It ain't as flat here as it is in Indiana where you are, big difference if you a load in your cute little trailer.
Obviously, you've never been to Brown County , IN. As a non-native, I must say I was surprised myself.

Also, You don't know my cycling friends.
And yes, some of them live in your neck of the woods.

It's all about strength vs. weight.

If YOU can't pedal 40 lbs of dogfood up a 15% grade I understand (it's not easy!!!) but to say that NO one can is also ridiculous.

This is why we keep the van. Once a month or so we do "big shopping" using the car. Otherwise we LIKE the one-to-three times per week model because we LIKE fresh fruits and veggies. It's not frugal in the sense of "Walmart Cheap" but it's frugal for US in the sense of healthfulness and well-being. Each person must find his or her own tipping point.

Good luck and best wishes!
 
Old 04-17-2010, 07:36 PM
 
16,301 posts, read 24,240,875 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by plaidmom View Post
If YOU can't pedal 40 lbs of dogfood up a 15% grade I understand (it's not easy!!!) but to say that NO one can is also ridiculous.
Never said no one could but based on the very few I do see going up the road to my neighborhood, and none with a load or trailer, it feel it is safe to say 90 - 95% can't.

Nor do I even want to
 
Old 04-17-2010, 07:36 PM
Status: "Make America the Great Joke Again" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Denver
9,061 posts, read 15,475,124 times
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Where I live in the Bay, many grocery stores deliver for free. Tip the dude 10 bucks and you are done for 2 weeks.
 
Old 04-17-2010, 08:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Asheville Native View Post
Nor do I even want to
That says it all!

The rest of what you're using are excuses for your choice to live a car dependent lifestyle. You live on a big hill, and that was your choice. You don't live near a store, and that's another choice. You haul home bottled water instead of filtering tap water and that's another choice.

Car free living can be a great life, and considerably cheaper than driving everywhere. If you occasionally need to take a cab to haul a big load of groceries home, that cost is easily offset from the savings of not paying for interest, depreciation, registration, maintenance, insurance, fuel, oil changes, tires, etc.

I still have several cars, but they're used less and less every year as I work to simplify my life. It's cheaper for me to walk to the corner gas station and pay $4 for a gallon for milk than to spend $3 on a round trip to Wal-mart to buy it for $3.25. They have ice cream there too...
 
Old 04-17-2010, 08:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sterlinggirl View Post
. They have ice cream there too...
Plus, when you RIDE to get your ice cream you get to burn off some of the calories "pre factum". haha.
 
Old 04-18-2010, 07:44 AM
 
3,647 posts, read 9,313,632 times
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I'd like to see these cyclists after riding their bikes 12 miles to an office environment in 117 degree heat - BEFORE you throw in 90% humidity. Yikes! Very few offices have showers.

We have only one car for our family - it's not always convenient, but it works for us. We are self employed. I came to the realization that dh & I are always together (or almost). When it becomes necessary, we could rent a car for a few days. In the past 7 1/2 months we've been a one car family, I've rented a car ONCE. I needed it for one day, but because of a weekend special, I had it for 3. $75 in 7 months. It sat in the driveway most of the time. The folks working there laughed at me when they saw the mileage on it when I returned it - 38 miles total. The rental place is 5 miles from my house.
 
Old 04-18-2010, 09:02 AM
 
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Why all the defensiveness? I think we all understand that giving up a car on a whim isn't possible for most folks, and once you're locked into an exurban house on the side of a mountain or the middle of a desert, who can blame you for not getting all excited about dropping the car? But, please recognize that those choices drive the necessity for automotive transport. You don't have to live on the side of a mountain, in the middle of a desert, or 30 miles from your workplace.

My spouse and I gave up the big house in the exurbs because we wanted to live a car-lite lifestyle. People were shocked when we moved into an older, smaller, and more expensive house closer to the city, donated the second car and essentially parked the remaining one. They couldn't believe that this would would lead to a better, cheaper lifestyle over the long run. But, the fact is that people and society in general vastly underestimate how much money they spend on cars and the infrastructure that supports them.

Our new house costs about $50k more than the big house we had in the rural area outside the city. It seems like a lot of money, but that's quite a bit less than a couple of new cars, plus the insurance, maintenance, registration, and fuel to keep them running. (Over the past year, our neighbors have bought nearly $80k of luxury vehicles. Good for them, but, whoa, that's a lot of money for two rapidly depreciating assets no matter how fun to drive.) Add in the cost of health care to treat diseases from living a sedentary life behind the wheel or the cost of emergency care following the accident that would have happened eventually, and I truly believe that giving up the highway commute was the best thing we ever did for ourselves.

It wasn't easy to do in a culture and state that values wide open spaces and personal freedom. Giving up the car required changing job focus and advocating for clients closer to the office on public transportation. It means sometimes walking or riding in inclement weather or having to wait for the Call-n-Ride, which fortunately stops right in front of our house. It means dealing with the inconvenience of not being able to rush right out and get something. It means living without pets that require 40-lb. bags of food unless we choose to have it delivered and filling our glasses straight from the tap rather than buying cases of bottled water. It means always having to plan ahead and possibly needing to rely on neighbors in an emergency. It means sometimes having to say no to our children's requests and dealing with the occasional criticism from ignorant people.

But, here's the good stuff. It means no car payment, no insurance payment, no traffic jams, no road rage, no fast food runs, and no waiting in line at the DMV. It means no Saturday mornings wasted washing and vacuuming the car. It means a healthier, physically active lifestyle and a minimized risk of traumatic injury. It means getting to know my community better because I'm frequenting walkable, local businesses. It means fewer opportunities to buy crap we don't need. It means having a great reason not to over schedule our family. It means living a more intentional, more fulfilling life.

I'm confident that we've made a good decision and one that will have tremendous benefits for our planet and ourselves. Your mileage may vary, but please stop the thoughtless criticism. Life without driving is a valid and wonderful way to go for those who desire it.

Last edited by formercalifornian; 04-18-2010 at 10:27 AM..
 
Old 04-18-2010, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Planet Eaarth
8,957 posts, read 17,013,046 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike from back east View Post
I agree. Funny, the "independence" of a car quickly breeds a DEPENDENCE on them which notoriously resembles addiction.
Interesting. Now I understand why the the topic of bicycles as personal transportation draw such asinine responses.....It's the car ADDICT in denial of the facts. All addicts behave in this fashion....why shouldn't car addicts?
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