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Old 07-10-2010, 11:31 AM
 
260 posts, read 1,875,837 times
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Can anyone comment on the difference between wood and bark mulch. Our landscaper showed up today with a sample of wood mulch, but I am leaning toward bark mulch. My understanding is that wood mulch can be any sort of wood scraps that are chopped up and stained. Bark mulch is scrapings of actual tree bark, larger pieces, and tends to hold it's color more. The wood mulch the house developer used out front is 6 months old and looks faded already. It's my understanding the bark mulch will cost more, but not sure how much. Any insights?
thanks
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Old 07-11-2010, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
5,409 posts, read 9,558,582 times
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I prefer wood mulch in an active bed because it breaks down and adds to the richness of the soil over time. The bark mulch is good for areas where there won't be a lot of plants growing. For example, I use bark mulch on a path in my yard - in that case it holds up much better than wood mulch.
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Old 07-12-2010, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
147 posts, read 540,140 times
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If you have alkaline soil and use a hardwood mulch it can make the soil more alkaline. I prefer the bark mulch, and it breaks down eventually.
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Old 07-15-2010, 05:38 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,259 posts, read 79,447,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnny999 View Post
If you have alkaline soil and use a hardwood mulch it can make the soil more alkaline. I prefer the bark mulch, and it breaks down eventually.
I mentioned somewhere else, there was an article in our local, weekly paper about some lady here, in our town, that actually grows her garden in hay (not just as a ground cover) I don't think we would even consider that, but I am going to do the hay thing as a ground cover next season.

Nita
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Old 07-15-2010, 08:55 AM
 
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I've read about growing stuff in hay in Mother Earth News, but even if you don't do that, a thick mulch of hay is great for a mulch in a vegetable garden.

I told my neighbor about using a hay mulch for veggie gardening....actually I was telling her about the "lasagna gardening" method, where you just layer stuff on the ground (no tilling) and then plant in it.....she got some old hay from someone, spread it out really thickly (probably a foot) over the grass, then dug holes and planted. She didn't even put any other organic matter under or in or on top of it. Best garden she ever had, she said.

Sorry, guess this is OT.
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Old 07-15-2010, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,259 posts, read 79,447,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luvvarkansas View Post
I've read about growing stuff in hay in Mother Earth News, but even if you don't do that, a thick mulch of hay is great for a mulch in a vegetable garden.

I told my neighbor about using a hay mulch for veggie gardening....actually I was telling her about the "lasagna gardening" method, where you just layer stuff on the ground (no tilling) and then plant in it.....she got some old hay from someone, spread it out really thickly (probably a foot) over the grass, then dug holes and planted. She didn't even put any other organic matter under or in or on top of it. Best garden she ever had, she said.

Sorry, guess this is OT.
thanks, I may not go quite that far, but I think I will try something similar next season. I am having a great garden this year except for my squash, but I also have too many weeds. They may not be hurting the garden, still they are hurting me, by driving me nuts.

Nita
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Old 07-15-2010, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
147 posts, read 540,140 times
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I've grown potatoes in hay. I broke up the ground with a tiller, spread some
0-20-20 fertilizer, laid the seed potatoes on the ground and covered them with about a foot of hay, not densely packed. Easiest potatoes to dig there ever was.
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Old 07-16-2010, 06:33 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,259 posts, read 79,447,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnny999 View Post
I've grown potatoes in hay. I broke up the ground with a tiller, spread some
0-20-20 fertilizer, laid the seed potatoes on the ground and covered them with about a foot of hay, not densely packed. Easiest potatoes to dig there ever was.
now I am getting excited about next years garden and I have barely started picking this years..
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Old 02-13-2011, 01:28 PM
 
Location: West Coast
82 posts, read 272,784 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luvvarkansas View Post
I've read about growing stuff in hay in Mother Earth News, but even if you don't do that, a thick mulch of hay is great for a mulch in a vegetable garden.

I told my neighbor about using a hay mulch for veggie gardening....actually I was telling her about the "lasagna gardening" method, where you just layer stuff on the ground (no tilling) and then plant in it.....she got some old hay from someone, spread it out really thickly (probably a foot) over the grass, then dug holes and planted. She didn't even put any other organic matter under or in or on top of it. Best garden she ever had, she said.

Sorry, guess this is OT.
There's this other thread still going on the lasagna gardening thing.

One Extra Aspect about Lasagna Gardening

About the paper aspect that is. Not so much the whole process.
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Old 02-13-2011, 02:59 PM
 
32,538 posts, read 29,319,241 times
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Have you got termites in your area? Do not use wood or bark mulch if you have termites! It's like giving them an appetizer and your house will be the main course.

(Explained to me by the Orkin man who made a pile of money off my stupidity and seconded by all the neighbors who told me not to use bark/wood mulch in the first place. Did I listen? Nooooo.....)
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